Figs in honey

figs in honey

Serves 12

  • 24 figs, halved

  • 2 clementines

  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

  • 2 tablespoons caster sugar

  • 1 large jar runny honey

Preheat your oven to 110ºC/225ºF/gas ¼. Lay your figs, cut-side up, in a baking tray. Using a fine grater, zest your clementines over the figs then dust the figs with a sprinkling of cinnamon and a teaspoon of sugar.



Pop the figs in the oven to bake for 4 hours, checking on them every hour or so. When they come out of the oven you'll have semi-dehydrated figs, which will be a bit like wine gums.



A really nice way of using them at Christmas is to turn them into a bit of a gift by popping a stack of them in a sterilised jar, covering them completely with honey then sealing the jar with an airtight lid. They'll be beautiful as part of a cheese platter, baked in a tart, a sticky toffee pud, or even thrown into a roasting tray with some pork or other meat for a bit of added sweetness. Give them to your mates when you go round to theirs for dinner. They'll love getting something unique, especially when you explain all the different things they can do with them.

Nutritional Information

Figs in honey

Perfect for a simple winter gift

More Christmas recipes >
0 foodies cooked this
There's something so wonderful about the fig and honey combo – try it on a festive cheeseboard
Serves 12
4h 05m
Super easy
Method

You should have no problem getting nice figs round Christmas time and they're wonderful to make in so many ways, so when you see them, buy them up! Here's one really gorgeous way to have them. I promise you won't get bored of these; there are so many lovely ways of using them up.

Preheat your oven to 110ºC/225ºF/gas ¼. Lay your figs, cut-side up, in a baking tray. Using a fine grater, zest your clementines over the figs then dust the figs with a sprinkling of cinnamon and a teaspoon of sugar.

Pop the figs in the oven to bake for 4 hours, checking on them every hour or so. When they come out of the oven you'll have semi-dehydrated figs, which will be a bit like wine gums.

A really nice way of using them at Christmas is to turn them into a bit of a gift by popping a stack of them in a sterilised jar, covering them completely with honey then sealing the jar with an airtight lid. They'll be beautiful as part of a cheese platter, baked in a tart, a sticky toffee pud, or even thrown into a roasting tray with some pork or other meat for a bit of added sweetness. Give them to your mates when you go round to theirs for dinner. They'll love getting something unique, especially when you explain all the different things they can do with them.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 154 8%
  • Carbs 34.1g 13%
  • Sugar 34.0g 38%
  • Fat 0.3g 0%
  • Saturates 0.1g 1%
  • Protein 21.6g 48%
Of an adult's reference intake

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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