Vegan blueberry pancakes

vegan blueberry pancakes

Makes 4

  • 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed

  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil

  • 250 ml unsweetened soya milk, or almond milk

  • 1 teaspoon cider vinegar

  • 125 g wholemeal flour

  • 1 teaspoon golden caster sugar

  • 1 teaspoon baking powder

  • ¼ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

  • 1 pinch of sea salt

  • 50 g blueberries, plus extra to serve

  • vegetable oil

  • soya yoghurt, to serve

  • maple syrup, to serve

Whisk together the ground flaxseed and 2½ tablespoons of cold water, then set aside to thicken. Meanwhile, melt the coconut oil in a small pan over a medium heat, then leave to cool slightly.



Combine the soya or almond milk and cider vinegar. Add the melted coconut oil, then whisk in the flaxseed mixture.



Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt, then make a well in the middle. Gradually pour in the wet mixture, stirring continuously until combined – don't worry if there are still a few lumps. Fold in the blueberries, then set aside.



Preheat the oven to its lowest temperature. Heat a splash of vegetable oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat. Add a ladleful of the batter to the pan (one ladleful is enough for one pancake), then add more ladlefuls of the batter, ensuring they're nicely spaced out – you'll need to do this in batches.



Cook for around 2 minutes, or until golden underneath and little bubbles start to appear on the surface, then use a palette knife to flip them over. Cook for a further 2 minutes, or until golden. Place in the oven to keep warm while you make the remaining pancakes.



Serve with a dollop of soya yoghurt, a drizzle of maple syrup and extra blueberries, if you like.



Find more vegan recipes

Nutritional Information

Vegan blueberry pancakes

Light, fluffy and delicious

More Vegetarian recipes >
0 foodies cooked this
A great alternative to classic breakfast pancakes, these vegan versions are the ultimate way to kick off the weekend
30m
Super easy
Method

Whisk together the ground flaxseed and 2½ tablespoons of cold water, then set aside to thicken. Meanwhile, melt the coconut oil in a small pan over a medium heat, then leave to cool slightly.

Combine the soya or almond milk and cider vinegar. Add the melted coconut oil, then whisk in the flaxseed mixture.

Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt, then make a well in the middle. Gradually pour in the wet mixture, stirring continuously until combined – don't worry if there are still a few lumps. Fold in the blueberries, then set aside.

Preheat the oven to its lowest temperature. Heat a splash of vegetable oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat. Add a ladleful of the batter to the pan (one ladleful is enough for one pancake), then add more ladlefuls of the batter, ensuring they're nicely spaced out – you'll need to do this in batches.

Cook for around 2 minutes, or until golden underneath and little bubbles start to appear on the surface, then use a palette knife to flip them over. Cook for a further 2 minutes, or until golden. Place in the oven to keep warm while you make the remaining pancakes.

Serve with a dollop of soya yoghurt, a drizzle of maple syrup and extra blueberries, if you like.

Find more vegan recipes

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 178 9%
  • Carbs 25.3g 10%
  • Sugar 5.1g 6%
  • Fat 6.9g 10%
  • Saturates 3.6g 18%
  • Protein 4.8g 11%
Of an adult's reference intake

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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