Pot-roasted shoulder of lamb with roasted butternut squash & sweet red onions

pot-roasted shoulder of lamb with roasted butternut squash and sweet red onions.

Serves 6-8

  • 1 quality shoulder of lamb, deboned and untied

  • 1 dessertspoon coriander seeds

  • 1 small handful fresh rosemary, leaves picked

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • extra virgin olive oil

  • 3 red onions, peeled and quartered

  • 565 ml cranberry juice

  • 2 butternut squash, quartered

  • 1 small handful fresh coriander, leaves picked

  • 4 spring onions, trimmed and finely sliced

  • juice of 1 lemon

  • 8 tablespoons fat-free natural yoghurt

Preheat the oven to 190ºC/375ºF/gas 5.



Lay out your shoulder of lamb. What you want to do is delicately flavour the meat, so pound up the coriander seeds with the rosemary and a pinch of salt in a pestle and mortar (or use a metal bowl and a rolling pin) until nice and fine. Take half this mixture and rub it over the inside of the lamb. Season it well with salt and pepper, then roll up the lamb and secure it with 4 or 5 pieces of string. The reason for doing this is to make the meat a consistent thickness – don't worry about doing it neatly, as long as it holds together it's fine.



Put a high-sided roasting tray on the hob and brown the lamb on all sides in a little olive oil. Remove from the heat, allow the lamb to cool a little, then add the red onions to the tray. Lift up the lamb, stir the onions around to cover them in all the flavoursome juices, then sit the lamb back on top and cook in the preheated oven for around 2 hours, adding the cranberry juice after the first half an hour and turning the heat down to 170ºC/325ºF/gas 3.



Turn the meat in its cooking juices when you can. By the end of the 2 hours you want the meat to be nice and crisp on the outside but really melt-in-your-mouth and tender. Sometimes the lamb may need a little longer, depending on the age of the animal. You'll also want enough juice left in the bottom of the tray to give everyone a nice spoonful – if it looks as if the liquid is going to cook away too quickly, add a little water and place a cartouche on top. Skim off any fat that cooks out of the meat.



While the lamb is cooking, rub the butternut squash with the rest of the spice mix and a drizzle of olive oil. Lay it in another roasting tray, season well and put it in the oven when the lamb's been cooking for just over an hour. Cook for around 45 minutes, until sweet and tender.



When the lamb's cooked, let it rest for 10 minutes, then remove the string. In a bowl mix together the coriander leaves, spring onions, lemon juice, 4 tablespoons of olive oil and seasoning. Toss together.



To serve, divide the squash between your plates, cut up the lamb into irregular sized slices, spoon over some tray juices, and sprinkle on the herb salad. A dollop of yoghurt on top is lovely.

Nutritional Information

Pot-roasted shoulder of lamb with roasted butternut squash & sweet red onions

With a coriander and rosemary rub

More Sunday lunch recipes >
0 foodies cooked this
The rub really gets into the lamb with this one, and it's fantastic with the spicy, sweet squash
Serves 6-8
2h 20m
Not too tricky
Method

This is a recipe inspired by my having a shoulder of lamb, butternut squash and some red onions all waiting to be used! No quaint story to tell but it did taste bloomin' lovely.

Preheat the oven to 190ºC/375ºF/gas 5.

Lay out your shoulder of lamb. What you want to do is delicately flavour the meat, so pound up the coriander seeds with the rosemary and a pinch of salt in a pestle and mortar (or use a metal bowl and a rolling pin) until nice and fine. Take half this mixture and rub it over the inside of the lamb. Season it well with salt and pepper, then roll up the lamb and secure it with 4 or 5 pieces of string. The reason for doing this is to make the meat a consistent thickness – don't worry about doing it neatly, as long as it holds together it's fine.

Put a high-sided roasting tray on the hob and brown the lamb on all sides in a little olive oil. Remove from the heat, allow the lamb to cool a little, then add the red onions to the tray. Lift up the lamb, stir the onions around to cover them in all the flavoursome juices, then sit the lamb back on top and cook in the preheated oven for around 2 hours, adding the cranberry juice after the first half an hour and turning the heat down to 170ºC/325ºF/gas 3.

Turn the meat in its cooking juices when you can. By the end of the 2 hours you want the meat to be nice and crisp on the outside but really melt-in-your-mouth and tender. Sometimes the lamb may need a little longer, depending on the age of the animal. You'll also want enough juice left in the bottom of the tray to give everyone a nice spoonful – if it looks as if the liquid is going to cook away too quickly, add a little water and place a cartouche on top. Skim off any fat that cooks out of the meat.

While the lamb is cooking, rub the butternut squash with the rest of the spice mix and a drizzle of olive oil. Lay it in another roasting tray, season well and put it in the oven when the lamb's been cooking for just over an hour. Cook for around 45 minutes, until sweet and tender.

When the lamb's cooked, let it rest for 10 minutes, then remove the string. In a bowl mix together the coriander leaves, spring onions, lemon juice, 4 tablespoons of olive oil and seasoning. Toss together.

To serve, divide the squash between your plates, cut up the lamb into irregular sized slices, spoon over some tray juices, and sprinkle on the herb salad. A dollop of yoghurt on top is lovely.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 530 27%
  • Carbs 32.9g 14%
  • Sugar 13.3g 15%
  • Fat 30.3g 43%
  • Saturates 12.8g 64%
  • Protein 28.9g 64%
Of an adult's reference intake

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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