Chargrilled pork leg with asparagus

Pork leg with asparagus

Serves 4

  • 100 g goat's cheese

  • 8 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus a little extra

  • 1 clove garlic

  • 1 small bunch fresh lemon thyme, leaves picked

  • 4 x 175 g higher-welfare pork escalopes, about 1cm thick

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • 500 g asparagus, finely sliced lengthways

  • 250 g green and yellow courgettes, finely sliced lengthways

  • 4 tablespoons cider vinegar or white wine vinegar

  • 1 bunch of fresh mint, leaves picked

Rub the goat's cheese with a little olive oil and cook on a hot griddle on both sides until nicely coloured. Remove and put to one side. Bash up the garlic and lemon thyme in a pestle and mortar (or use a metal bowl and the end of a rolling pin). Add a couple of splashes of olive oil, stir, and rub the mixture all over the pork escalopes.



Season the pork then put the escalopes, one by one, between 2 large pieces of cling film and hit them with something heavy and flat until they're about 0.5cm thick. This will make them really tender. Do this to all 4 escalopes.



Check that your griddle pan is hot, and chargrill your asparagus, then your courgettes, on both sides. Mark them nicely to give a bit of flavour and character to them. Put them into a salad bowl with the vinegar, 8 tablespoons of olive oil and half the fresh mint. Using the griddle pan again, chargrill your pork escalopes on both sides until nicely marked – about 4 minutes.



Tear each escalope in half and scatter these into the salad bowl with the rest of the mint (for a lovely fresh burst of flavour) and the crumbled goat's cheese. Toss well, then place the bowl in the middle of the table and let everyone tuck in.

Nutritional Information

Chargrilled pork leg with asparagus

With colourful courgette ribbons and creamy goat's cheese

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Just a few simple ingredients transform pork leg escalopes into an impressive dinner
Serves 4
30m
Super easy
Method

This is a really good way to turn a cheap cut of meat into something special. In this recipe, we're going to get nice thin escalopes of pork from the leg, flavour them and prepare them so they cook quickly. You could also use chicken or even veal in the same way, if you fancy.

Rub the goat's cheese with a little olive oil and cook on a hot griddle on both sides until nicely coloured. Remove and put to one side. Bash up the garlic and lemon thyme in a pestle and mortar (or use a metal bowl and the end of a rolling pin). Add a couple of splashes of olive oil, stir, and rub the mixture all over the pork escalopes.

Season the pork then put the escalopes, one by one, between 2 large pieces of cling film and hit them with something heavy and flat until they're about 0.5cm thick. This will make them really tender. Do this to all 4 escalopes.

Check that your griddle pan is hot, and chargrill your asparagus, then your courgettes, on both sides. Mark them nicely to give a bit of flavour and character to them. Put them into a salad bowl with the vinegar, 8 tablespoons of olive oil and half the fresh mint. Using the griddle pan again, chargrill your pork escalopes on both sides until nicely marked – about 4 minutes.

Tear each escalope in half and scatter these into the salad bowl with the rest of the mint (for a lovely fresh burst of flavour) and the crumbled goat's cheese. Toss well, then place the bowl in the middle of the table and let everyone tuck in.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 779 39%
  • Carbs 4.8g 2%
  • Sugar 3.8g 4%
  • Fat 63.1g 90%
  • Saturates 18.9g 95%
  • Protein 45.1g 100%
Of an adult's reference intake

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BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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