Roasted carrots & beets with the juiciest pork chops

Juicy pork chops

Serves 4

  • 750 g carrots, mixed colours if available, peeled

  • 750 g beets, different sizes and colours if available

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 bulb garlic, broken apart, half the cloves smashed, half left whole

  • extra virgin olive oil

  • juice of 1 orange

  • a few sprigs of fresh thyme, leaves picked

  • a few sprigs of fresh rosemary, leaves picked

  • 5 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

  • 4 thick higher-welfare pork loin chops, skin on

  • 8 fresh sage leaves

  • 1 lemon

Preheat the oven to 220°C/425°F/gas 7. Put your carrots into a large pot and your beets into another, and add enough water to cover them. Season with salt and bring to the boil. Cook for 15 to 20 minutes until just tender, then drain and place in separate bowls. Peel your beets, and cut any larger carrots and beets in half or into quarters. Smaller ones can stay whole.



Now add your flavourings while the veg are still hot. Toss the carrots with half the smashed garlic and a lug of olive oil, then lightly season. Add the orange juice and the thyme leaves and toss again. Mix the beets with the rest of the garlic, the rosemary, balsamic vinegar and salt and pepper. You can now put the veg either into separate ovenproof dishes, or together on a large roasting tray with the carrots in one half of the tray and the beets in the other. Place in middle of the preheated oven and roast for around half an hour or until golden.



While the carrots and beets are cooking, lay the pork chops on a board and score through the skin and the streaky-looking part of the meat. This will give you lovely crackling. Look at the picture – you'll see what I mean. Firmly press a sage leaf on to the eye meat on both sides of each chop. Season with salt and pepper.



When the vegetables start to colour, heat a large ovenproof frying pan or small roasting tray on the hob, add a good lug of olive oil and put in the chops. As soon as you've got nice colour on one side, turn the chops over and place the tray in the oven for 10 minutes, or until the chops are crisp on the outside and just cooked through and juicy in the middle. Remove the chops to a warmed plate. Pour most of the fat away from the tray and add a squeeze of lemon juice to it. Stir and scrape the lovely sticky bits off the bottom and drizzle all over the chops. Remove the carrots and beets from the oven – they should be nice and sticky by now. Serve them with the chops and a glass of wine.

Nutritional Information

Roasted carrots & beets with the juiciest pork chops

Easy ways to transform the humble carrot

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Boiled, mashed, roasted or fried to perfection – these easy-peasy carrot recipes work wonders
Serves 4
1h 20m
Super easy
Method

Carrots and beets are particularly good when roasted as it brings out their natural sugars. The best advice I can give you is about flavouring them. A few smashed garlic cloves, a woody herb like rosemary, thyme, sage or bay, and a splash of vinegar, or squeezed lemon or orange juice, can accentuate their natural flavour.

Preheat the oven to 220°C/425°F/gas 7. Put your carrots into a large pot and your beets into another, and add enough water to cover them. Season with salt and bring to the boil. Cook for 15 to 20 minutes until just tender, then drain and place in separate bowls. Peel your beets, and cut any larger carrots and beets in half or into quarters. Smaller ones can stay whole.

Now add your flavourings while the veg are still hot. Toss the carrots with half the smashed garlic and a lug of olive oil, then lightly season. Add the orange juice and the thyme leaves and toss again. Mix the beets with the rest of the garlic, the rosemary, balsamic vinegar and salt and pepper. You can now put the veg either into separate ovenproof dishes, or together on a large roasting tray with the carrots in one half of the tray and the beets in the other. Place in middle of the preheated oven and roast for around half an hour or until golden.

While the carrots and beets are cooking, lay the pork chops on a board and score through the skin and the streaky-looking part of the meat. This will give you lovely crackling. Look at the picture – you'll see what I mean. Firmly press a sage leaf on to the eye meat on both sides of each chop. Season with salt and pepper.

When the vegetables start to colour, heat a large ovenproof frying pan or small roasting tray on the hob, add a good lug of olive oil and put in the chops. As soon as you've got nice colour on one side, turn the chops over and place the tray in the oven for 10 minutes, or until the chops are crisp on the outside and just cooked through and juicy in the middle. Remove the chops to a warmed plate. Pour most of the fat away from the tray and add a squeeze of lemon juice to it. Stir and scrape the lovely sticky bits off the bottom and drizzle all over the chops. Remove the carrots and beets from the oven – they should be nice and sticky by now. Serve them with the chops and a glass of wine.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 586 29%
  • Carbs 28.9g 13%
  • Sugar 25.0g 28%
  • Fat 33.9g 48%
  • Saturates 12.3g 62%
  • Protein 33.8g 75%
Of an adult woman's guideline daily amount

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BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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