Sweet cherry tomato & sausage bake

Sausage Bake

Serves 6

  • 2 kg lovely ripe cherry tomatoes, mixed colours if you can find them

  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme

  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary

  • 2 sprigs fresh bay

  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano

  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped

  • 12 higher-welfare Cumberland or coarse Italian pork sausages

  • extra virgin olive oil

  • balsamic vinegar

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/gas 5. Get yourself an appropriately sized roasting tray, large enough to take the tomatoes in one snug-fitting layer. Put in all your tomatoes, the herb sprigs, oregano, garlic and sausages. Drizzle well with extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar and season with salt and pepper. Toss together, then make sure the sausages are on top and pop the tray into the oven for half an hour. After this time, give it a shake and turn the sausages over. Put back into the oven for 15 to 30 minutes, depending on how golden and sticky you like your sausages.



Once it's cooked, you'll have an intense, tomatoey sauce. If it's a little too thin, lift out the sausages and place the tray on the hob to cook it down to the consistency you like – I tend to make mine quick thick – then put the sausages back in. Check the seasoning and serve either with a good-quality loaf of bread warmed through in a low oven for 10 minutes (great for mopping up the sauce!) or with mashed potato, rice or polenta, a green salad and a nice glass of wine.

Nutritional Information

Sweet cherry tomato & sausage bake

Ultimate one-tray comfort food

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0 foodies cooked this
Bold use of herbs and an intense tomato sauce really make the flavours in this sausage bake sing
Serves 6
35m
Super easy
Method

There are so many things I love about this dish: it's all cooked in one tray; we're using more robust herbs like thyme, rosemary and bay with the tomatoes, which work really well; the half-roasted, half-stewed fresh tomatoes turn into a lovely rich and chunky sauce which is miles better than anything you can get if using tinned tomatoes; and we're roasting the sausages, which I think is far better than frying or grilling them. Try to buy the best fresh coarsely ground sausages you can. PS Any leftovers can be chopped up and made into a wonderful chunky pasta dish, using penne or rigatoni, the next day.

Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/gas 5. Get yourself an appropriately sized roasting tray, large enough to take the tomatoes in one snug-fitting layer. Put in all your tomatoes, the herb sprigs, oregano, garlic and sausages. Drizzle well with extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar and season with salt and pepper. Toss together, then make sure the sausages are on top and pop the tray into the oven for half an hour. After this time, give it a shake and turn the sausages over. Put back into the oven for 15 to 30 minutes, depending on how golden and sticky you like your sausages.

Once it's cooked, you'll have an intense, tomatoey sauce. If it's a little too thin, lift out the sausages and place the tray on the hob to cook it down to the consistency you like – I tend to make mine quick thick – then put the sausages back in. Check the seasoning and serve either with a good-quality loaf of bread warmed through in a low oven for 10 minutes (great for mopping up the sauce!) or with mashed potato, rice or polenta, a green salad and a nice glass of wine.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 391 20%
  • Carbs 13.1g 6%
  • Sugar 11g 12%
  • Fat 27.1g 39%
  • Saturates 10.2g 51%
  • Protein 21.8g 48%
Of an adult's reference intake

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

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http://www.fishonline.org

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