Everyday green chopped salad

Chopped Green Salad

Serves 4

  • 4 scallions

  • ½ cucumber

  • 1 handful fresh basil leaves

  • ½ head Boston lettuce, or small red leaf lettuce

  • ½ heart romaine

  • ½ cup sprouted cress or alfafa

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

  • ½ teaspoon Dijon or English mustard

  • ⅛ teaspoon sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • ½ cup chopped toasted walnuts, or your favourite nuts

Get yourself a big chopping board and a large sharp knife. It's best to start by chopping the harder, crunchier veggies first, so trim and chop your scallions and slice your cucumber. Slice your basil. Bring it all into the centre of the board, and continue chopping and mixing together.



Add the lettuce leaves, and cress or alfalfa to the board. When everything is well chopped, you'll have a big mound of salad on the board.



Make a well in the middle and drizzle in the extra virgin olive oil and red wine vinegar. Add the mustard and the salt and pepper. Sprinkle with nuts. Mix up so everything gets well coated and serve on the board or in a bowl.



Serving suggestions:

This makes a nice addition to any main dish such as Barbecued chicken, Spaghetti and meatballs or Old-school pork chops with apples.



Jamie's tips:



- What I want to show you here is that the sky's the limit when it comes to the different ingredients you can add to a chopped salad – you can use whatever's available.

- The only rule I would give you is to always include a couple of handfuls of crunchy lettuce to give your salad a really good texture. Try out different things, and don't feel obliged to use the same old stuff all the time. Bell peppers, tomatoes, herb sprigs, a peeled and pitted avocado . . . you can get any or all of these into a chopped salad.

- Basil works well in this salad, but so do lots of other soft fresh herbs, such as chives, chervil, or mint.

- For a bit of extra crunch, simply toast some nuts in a warm pan, but watch them as once they start to go brown they can burn very quickly.

Nutritional Information

Everyday green chopped salad

With easy homemade dressing and nuts

More Vegetables recipes ->
0 foodies cooked this
This just goes to show that even the simplest green salad can pack a real flavour punch
Serves 4
10m
Super easy
Print this recipe
Method

Chopped salads are incredibly simple to make, you have to give them a go. If nothing else, they can offer you some chopping practice, so why not make something tasty while you're practicing your knife skills? Anyone can make these salads, just make sure you use a good, sharp chef's knife and your biggest chopping board – and watch your fingers!

Get yourself a big chopping board and a large sharp knife. It's best to start by chopping the harder, crunchier veggies first, so trim and chop your scallions and slice your cucumber. Slice your basil. Bring it all into the centre of the board, and continue chopping and mixing together.

Add the lettuce leaves, and cress or alfalfa to the board. When everything is well chopped, you'll have a big mound of salad on the board.

Make a well in the middle and drizzle in the extra virgin olive oil and red wine vinegar. Add the mustard and the salt and pepper. Sprinkle with nuts. Mix up so everything gets well coated and serve on the board or in a bowl.

Serving suggestions:
This makes a nice addition to any main dish such as Barbecued chicken, Spaghetti and meatballs or Old-school pork chops with apples.

Jamie's tips:

- What I want to show you here is that the sky's the limit when it comes to the different ingredients you can add to a chopped salad – you can use whatever's available.
- The only rule I would give you is to always include a couple of handfuls of crunchy lettuce to give your salad a really good texture. Try out different things, and don't feel obliged to use the same old stuff all the time. Bell peppers, tomatoes, herb sprigs, a peeled and pitted avocado . . . you can get any or all of these into a chopped salad.
- Basil works well in this salad, but so do lots of other soft fresh herbs, such as chives, chervil, or mint.
- For a bit of extra crunch, simply toast some nuts in a warm pan, but watch them as once they start to go brown they can burn very quickly.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:

Calories

Calories are just a unit of energy. If you eat more than you use you can gain weight, or lose it if you don't eat enough. How much you need depends on your weight, gender and how active you are, but it's around 2,000 a day.

Carbs

Carbs are a great source of energy and, excluding foods such as potatoes, are made from grains - like bread, pasta and cereal. We all need carbs, but try to make them all wholegrain by sticking to brown bread, rice and pasta - they are much more nutritious.

Sugar

We all deserve a treat sometimes, but try to limit your sugar intake. Most of your sugar should come from raw fruit and milk, because they give us lots of nutrients too. Always check food labels so you know how much sugar you're eating.

Fat

We all need to eat a small amount of fat because it protects our organs and helps us grow. But we need to be careful about how much fat we eat and what kinds of fat, because in higher levels it's associated with weight gain, diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

Saturates

Saturated or "bad fats" are in beef, pork, chicken skin, butter, cream and cheese. Too much can be bad for our heart and cholesterol levels, but unsaturated or "good fats" in fish, nuts, avocados and some oils can help keep our hearts healthy if eaten in moderation.

Protein

Protein helps our muscles to grow and repair, as well as providing you with essential amino acids. When it comes to protein, try to eat leaner sources such as chicken and fish or non-meat sources such as eggs, dairy, beans, nuts, seeds, tofu and pulses.
  • Calories 94
    5%
  • Carbs 2.7g
    1%
  • Sugar 2.1g 2%
  • Fat 7.9g 11%
  • Saturates 1.1g 6%
  • Protein 1.8g 4%
Of an adult's reference intake

Related recipes:

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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  • 4 scallions

  • ½ cucumber

  • 1 handful fresh basil leaves

  • ½ head Boston lettuce, or small red leaf lettuce

  • ½ heart romaine

  • ½ cup sprouted cress or alfafa

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

  • ½ teaspoon Dijon or English mustard

  • ⅛ teaspoon sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • ½ cup chopped toasted walnuts, or your favourite nuts