Potato, celeriac & truffle oil soup

Celeriac Soup & Truffle Oil

Serves 6

  • 1 white onion, peeled and roughly chopped

  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

  • 1 bunch fresh thyme

  • 500 g celeriac, peeled and roughly diced

  • 500 g floury potatoes, peeled and roughly diced

  • 1.1 litres organic chicken stock

  • 100 ml single cream

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • 3-4 tablespoons truffle oil

In an appropriately sized pot, slowly fry the onion in the olive oil for about 5 minutes until translucent and soft but not coloured at all. Get your bunch of thyme, tie it up with a little string and add to the pot with the celeriac, potatoes and stock. Bring to the boil and simmer for 40 minutes until the vegetables are tender. Add the cream, bring back to the boil, then remove the thyme and purée the mixture in a liquidizer or food processor. Season carefully to taste, adding the truffle oil tablespoon by tablespoon – the oil can vary in strength depending on the brand. Divide between your serving bowls. Feel free to improvise by adding croûtons, a little extra cream or, if you're really lucky, some real black or white truffles shaved over the top.



Try this: If you want to give an edge to this comforting soup, try dressing some chopped parsley and celery leaves with a little olive oil and lemon juice. Sprinkle over the soup at the last minute before serving.

Nutritional Information

Potato, celeriac & truffle oil soup

Deliciously warming in winter

More Gorgeous Winter Soups recipes >
0 foodies cooked this
I love this comforting, creamy celeriac and potato soup as it comes but add the truffle oil and… wow
Serves 6
1h
Super easy
Method

The fact is, I know using truffles at home is a little pretentious and very decadent, but even my local supermarket now stocks truffle oil. Admittedly it's more than likely not the real McCoy, but it does have a flavour you can't put your finger on – a kind of fragrant, garlicky, encapsulating smell which when used with subtlety is great. Truffle oil can be used for so many things – with a simple risotto or tagliatelle it's amazing. Then, when you've got the bug, treat yourself to the real thing, be it black or the exceptional white truffle.

In an appropriately sized pot, slowly fry the onion in the olive oil for about 5 minutes until translucent and soft but not coloured at all. Get your bunch of thyme, tie it up with a little string and add to the pot with the celeriac, potatoes and stock. Bring to the boil and simmer for 40 minutes until the vegetables are tender. Add the cream, bring back to the boil, then remove the thyme and purée the mixture in a liquidizer or food processor. Season carefully to taste, adding the truffle oil tablespoon by tablespoon – the oil can vary in strength depending on the brand. Divide between your serving bowls. Feel free to improvise by adding croûtons, a little extra cream or, if you're really lucky, some real black or white truffles shaved over the top.

Try this: If you want to give an edge to this comforting soup, try dressing some chopped parsley and celery leaves with a little olive oil and lemon juice. Sprinkle over the soup at the last minute before serving.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 350 18%
  • Carbs 23.3g 10%
  • Sugar 6.1g 7%
  • Fat 24.4g 35%
  • Saturates 5.2g 26%
  • Protein 8.3g 18%
Of an adult's reference intake

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Marine Stewardship Council
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