Zombie brain

zombie Brain Vegetables Recipes

Serves 6

  • 1 large celeriac

  • olive oil

  • 6 sprigs of fresh thyme

  • 7 fresh bay leaves

  • 6 cloves of garlic

  • 30 g unsalted butter

  • 200 g pearl barley

  • 1 small onion

  • 800 g mushrooms

  • ¼ of a cube of vegetable stock

  • 150 ml single cream

  • 1 heaped teaspoon English mustard

  • extra virgin olive oil

Mind-blowing flavours come from the slow-roasting of this whole celeriac. I'm fully aware that the general scenario and name might seem very weird, but vegetarian, meat-atarian, whoever you are, please open your mind and have a go at this bad boy – it's delicious, fulfilling, funny, and you'll get people talking.



Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/gas 5. Scrub the celeriac clean, using a brush to clean away any soil from the root. Tear off a double layer of wide tin foil and place the celeriac in the middle, root side up. Rub with olive oil, salt and pepper, sprinkle over the thyme sprigs and 6 bay leaves, then bash 4 whole cloves of garlic and scatter over. Pull the sides of the foil up really tightly around the celeriac and scrunch around its shape, leaving it open at the top. Place the butter on top of the celeriac so that it melts down and around it as it cooks, then fold the foil over really tightly to seal. Place in an ovenproof dish and roast for around 2 hours, or until tender.



Meanwhile, cook the pearl barley at the appropriate time according to packet instructions. Peel and finely slice the onion and remaining garlic, place in a large frying pan on a low heat with a lug of olive oil, and fry for around 10 minutes, or until softened, stirring occasionally. Finely slice the mushrooms and add (your pan will be very full, but trust me, they will cook down nicely). Cook for around 20 minutes, or until golden, continuing to stir occasionally. Crumble in the stock cube, add the remaining bay leaf and pour in 200ml of boiling water. Simmer and reduce until the liquid has nearly gone, then stir in the cream and mustard and simmer for a further 5 minutes. Season to perfection and keep warm until needed, being careful not to let it get too thick.



Around 10 minutes before the celeriac is ready, carefully open up the foil and start basting every couple of minutes with the melted butter for extra colour. Drain the pearl barley and dress it with salt, pepper and extra virgin olive oil. Place the celeriac on a board and carve thinly, like you would a joint of meat. Drizzle with any juices from the foil, then serve with the mushroom sauce, pearl barley and lots of beautiful seasonal greens.



Jamie's top tip: Contrary to perception, truffle oil in little bottles can be picked up in most supermarkets fairly cheaply, and half a teaspoon will very subtly transform this sauce to make it even more delicious, so add some, if you've got it.

Nutritional Information

Zombie brain

Magnificent whole-roasted celeriac, mushroom sauce & barley

Vegetarian, meat-arian… whoever you are, have a go at this bad boy! It’s delicious, fulfilling, funny, and you’ll get people talking
Serves 6
2h 15m
Not too tricky
Method

Mind-blowing flavours come from the slow-roasting of this whole celeriac. I'm fully aware that the general scenario and name might seem very weird, but vegetarian, meat-atarian, whoever you are, please open your mind and have a go at this bad boy – it's delicious, fulfilling, funny, and you'll get people talking.

Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/gas 5. Scrub the celeriac clean, using a brush to clean away any soil from the root. Tear off a double layer of wide tin foil and place the celeriac in the middle, root side up. Rub with olive oil, salt and pepper, sprinkle over the thyme sprigs and 6 bay leaves, then bash 4 whole cloves of garlic and scatter over. Pull the sides of the foil up really tightly around the celeriac and scrunch around its shape, leaving it open at the top. Place the butter on top of the celeriac so that it melts down and around it as it cooks, then fold the foil over really tightly to seal. Place in an ovenproof dish and roast for around 2 hours, or until tender.

Meanwhile, cook the pearl barley at the appropriate time according to packet instructions. Peel and finely slice the onion and remaining garlic, place in a large frying pan on a low heat with a lug of olive oil, and fry for around 10 minutes, or until softened, stirring occasionally. Finely slice the mushrooms and add (your pan will be very full, but trust me, they will cook down nicely). Cook for around 20 minutes, or until golden, continuing to stir occasionally. Crumble in the stock cube, add the remaining bay leaf and pour in 200ml of boiling water. Simmer and reduce until the liquid has nearly gone, then stir in the cream and mustard and simmer for a further 5 minutes. Season to perfection and keep warm until needed, being careful not to let it get too thick.

Around 10 minutes before the celeriac is ready, carefully open up the foil and start basting every couple of minutes with the melted butter for extra colour. Drain the pearl barley and dress it with salt, pepper and extra virgin olive oil. Place the celeriac on a board and carve thinly, like you would a joint of meat. Drizzle with any juices from the foil, then serve with the mushroom sauce, pearl barley and lots of beautiful seasonal greens.

Jamie's top tip: Contrary to perception, truffle oil in little bottles can be picked up in most supermarkets fairly cheaply, and half a teaspoon will very subtly transform this sauce to make it even more delicious, so add some, if you've got it.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 333 17%
  • Carbs 30.8g 12%
  • Sugar 6g 7%
  • Fat 15.2g 22%
  • Saturates 6.4g 32%
  • Protein 12.2g 27%
Of an adult's reference intake

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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