Stuffing

Pork Stuffing

Serves 10

  • 2 large onions, peeled and quartered

  • 50 g stale bread

  • 200 g vac-packed chestnuts

  • 1 kg higher-welfare shoulder of pork, trimmed and diced

  • 1 bunch fresh sage, leaves picked

  • 3 rashers smoked streaky bacon, roughly chopped

  • freshly ground white pepper

  • sea salt

  • 1 whole fresh nutmeg, for grating

  • 1 lemon

  • 1 orange or clementine

Preheat your oven to 190ºC/375ºF/gas 5. Blitz the onions in the food processor until finely chopped, then tip into a large bowl. Tear the stale bread into small chunks and whiz into breadcrumbs. Add these to the bowl, then crush and crumble your chestnuts in there too. Tip your diced pork into the food processor with the sage leaves, bacon, a level teaspoon of white pepper and a good pinch of salt. Finely grate in a quarter of the nutmeg, the zest of half a lemon and just 2 or 3 gratings of orange or clementine zest. Pulse until you've got some chunks and some mush, it won't even take a minute, then tip into the mixing bowl.



Because the pork is raw, you're committed to seasoning it well so add another pinch of salt and white pepper, then get your clean hands in there and scrunch it all up until well combined.



Take just under half of the stuffing out of the bowl to use for your turkey, then transfer the rest to a lovely earthenware-type dish that you can serve from. Use your hands to break it up and push it about, then flatten it all down. Pop it in the oven to cook for 50 minutes to 1 hour until bubbling and crispy. If you're doing it as part of your Christmas lunch, you want to get it on about the same time as your spuds.



When done, you can pour away any excess fat before serving if you want to. It will be soft, juicy and succulent on the inside, then gnarly, crispy and chewy on the outside. Delicious.

Nutritional Information

Stuffing

Pork, sage, onion and chestnuts – a great combo

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0 foodies cooked this
Freshly minced pork makes the best stuffing ever and really gives your roast dinner some oomph
Serves 10
1h 05m
Super easy
Method

Making your own minced pork like I've done here really turns your stuffing into something special. It will give you amazing flavour and texture, and it's wicked to be able to see everything you've got in there. Usually I'd sweat the onions off first, but this year I decided to keep it rough and ready, quick and easy. It's basically bish, bash, bosh but with a bit of love, care and intelligence.

Preheat your oven to 190ºC/375ºF/gas 5. Blitz the onions in the food processor until finely chopped, then tip into a large bowl. Tear the stale bread into small chunks and whiz into breadcrumbs. Add these to the bowl, then crush and crumble your chestnuts in there too. Tip your diced pork into the food processor with the sage leaves, bacon, a level teaspoon of white pepper and a good pinch of salt. Finely grate in a quarter of the nutmeg, the zest of half a lemon and just 2 or 3 gratings of orange or clementine zest. Pulse until you've got some chunks and some mush, it won't even take a minute, then tip into the mixing bowl.

Because the pork is raw, you're committed to seasoning it well so add another pinch of salt and white pepper, then get your clean hands in there and scrunch it all up until well combined.

Take just under half of the stuffing out of the bowl to use for your turkey, then transfer the rest to a lovely earthenware-type dish that you can serve from. Use your hands to break it up and push it about, then flatten it all down. Pop it in the oven to cook for 50 minutes to 1 hour until bubbling and crispy. If you're doing it as part of your Christmas lunch, you want to get it on about the same time as your spuds.

When done, you can pour away any excess fat before serving if you want to. It will be soft, juicy and succulent on the inside, then gnarly, crispy and chewy on the outside. Delicious.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 209 10%
  • Carbs 11.8g 5%
  • Sugar 3.1g 3%
  • Fat 8.1g 12%
  • Saturates 2.7g 14%
  • Protein 22.2g 49%
Of an adult's reference intake

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

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