Carrots

Carrots

Serves 4

  • 500 g carrots

  • salt

  • 1 tablespoon sugar

  • 1 knob butter, plus a little extra

  • 1 small handful of fresh herbs

  • 1 orange

  • a few whole cloves garlic

  • 1 pinch cumin

  • salt

  • pepper

carrots boiled with orange, garlic and herbs:



Boil the carrots in salted boiling water with a tablespoon of sugar, a knob of butter and a little handful of fragrant herbs, tied up. Parsley, rosemary, thyme, bay – use just one or a mixture. Cut an orange into eighths and add them to the water, along with a few whole garlic cloves in their skins. If you really want to be a little tiger, add a pinch of cumin as well (seeds or ground) – it subtly cuts through with the most wonderful flavour. As soon as the carrots are cooked, drain them, discard the herbs and all but one of the orange pieces, squeeze the garlic out of its skin, chop the remaining orange piece finely and toss with the carrots, some seasoning and a little more butter. The flavour will be incredible.



Another idea is to fry the chopped-up orange in a good tablespoon of sugar, so it almost jammifies, and serve this on top of the carrots. These two flavours together are one of the coolest things.



roasted carrots with orange, garlic and thyme:



Or – just as easy – as soon as you drain the carrots you can throw them into a baking tray with the chopped-up orange and the garlic cloves and roast them at 200°C/400°F/gas 6 for 10 minutes – this will give you a slightly meatier flavour.



mashed carrots:



Or simply mash the carrots up with the orange and garlic, so you have some coarse and some smooth. Lovely.

Carrots

Easy ways to transform the humble carrot

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Boiled, mashed, roasted or fried to perfection – these easy-peasy carrot recipes work wonders
Serves 4
20m
Super easy
Method

Carrots are brilliant – full of vitamins and extremely good for you. In the last year or so, we've been lucky enough to have seen lots of different varieties of carrots available in the shops – long, round, peculiar-shaped, and even some purple ones. My favourite ways of cooking carrots all serve 4 people – for each recipe you will need 500g of carrots, either left whole if they are baby ones, or sliced into small erratic pieces – nothing too perfect.

carrots boiled with orange, garlic and herbs:

Boil the carrots in salted boiling water with a tablespoon of sugar, a knob of butter and a little handful of fragrant herbs, tied up. Parsley, rosemary, thyme, bay – use just one or a mixture. Cut an orange into eighths and add them to the water, along with a few whole garlic cloves in their skins. If you really want to be a little tiger, add a pinch of cumin as well (seeds or ground) – it subtly cuts through with the most wonderful flavour. As soon as the carrots are cooked, drain them, discard the herbs and all but one of the orange pieces, squeeze the garlic out of its skin, chop the remaining orange piece finely and toss with the carrots, some seasoning and a little more butter. The flavour will be incredible.

Another idea is to fry the chopped-up orange in a good tablespoon of sugar, so it almost jammifies, and serve this on top of the carrots. These two flavours together are one of the coolest things.

roasted carrots with orange, garlic and thyme:

Or – just as easy – as soon as you drain the carrots you can throw them into a baking tray with the chopped-up orange and the garlic cloves and roast them at 200°C/400°F/gas 6 for 10 minutes – this will give you a slightly meatier flavour.

mashed carrots:

Or simply mash the carrots up with the orange and garlic, so you have some coarse and some smooth. Lovely.

Related recipes:

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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