Squash laksa cups

Malaysian Laksa Soup

Serves 10

  • 600-700 g butternut or onion squash, halved, peeled and deseeded

  • 3 freeze-dried lime leaves, optional

  • 4 red chillies, deseeded and finely sliced

  • 2 cloves garlic, finely sliced

  • 2 thumb-sized pieces fresh ginger, roughly chopped

  • 2 sticks lemongrass, outer leaves discarded, roughly chopped

  • 1 small bunch fresh coriander, leaves picked and stalks chopped

  • 1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice

  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

  • 1 onion, finely sliced

  • 600 ml organic vegetable or chicken stock, hot

  • 200 g basmati rice

  • 2 x 400 ml coconut milk

  • juice of to taste 1-2 limes

  • fresh coconut shavings, to serve, optional

Roughly chop the squash into big chunks, then set aside. Whiz the lime leaves, if using, 3 of the chillies, the garlic, ginger, lemongrass, coriander stalks, Chinese five spice and cumin to a dryish paste in a food processor. Discard the stringy bits, if any.



Heat the oil in a deep saucepan over a medium-low heat. Add the spice paste and onion and cook gently for about 10 minutes, stirring to release the flavours. Add the squash and stock, and stir around, scraping all the goodness off the bottom of the pan. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, with the lid on, for about 15 minutes, until the squash is soft and cooked.



Pour in the rice and give it a really good stir – the squash might begin to break up, but it doesn't matter. Continue to simmer, covered, for 12 minutes, until the rice is just cooked.



Add the coconut milk, stir again, taste and season carefully. Bring back to a simmer, then add the lime juice, to taste. Spoon into tea or coffee cups and decorate with the fresh coriander leaves, the remaining sliced chilli and some shaved fresh coconut, if using.

Nutritional Information

Squash laksa cups

A spicy, Malaysian-inspired soup

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I've given this butternut squash soup a distinctly Asian twist with spices, lime and coconut milk
Serves 10
50m
Super easy
Method

A lovely, warming winter soup that's easy to make. It looks wicked in little tea cups with chilli, coriander and fresh coconut sprinkled on the top.

Roughly chop the squash into big chunks, then set aside. Whiz the lime leaves, if using, 3 of the chillies, the garlic, ginger, lemongrass, coriander stalks, Chinese five spice and cumin to a dryish paste in a food processor. Discard the stringy bits, if any.

Heat the oil in a deep saucepan over a medium-low heat. Add the spice paste and onion and cook gently for about 10 minutes, stirring to release the flavours. Add the squash and stock, and stir around, scraping all the goodness off the bottom of the pan. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, with the lid on, for about 15 minutes, until the squash is soft and cooked.

Pour in the rice and give it a really good stir – the squash might begin to break up, but it doesn't matter. Continue to simmer, covered, for 12 minutes, until the rice is just cooked.

Add the coconut milk, stir again, taste and season carefully. Bring back to a simmer, then add the lime juice, to taste. Spoon into tea or coffee cups and decorate with the fresh coriander leaves, the remaining sliced chilli and some shaved fresh coconut, if using.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 105 5%
  • Carbs 11.2g 5%
  • Sugar 6.0g 7%
  • Fat 4.8g 7%
  • Saturates 0.8g 4%
  • Protein 3.3g 7%
Of an adult's reference intake

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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