Slow-cooked shoulder of lamb with roasted vegetables

slow-cooked shoulder of lamb with roasted vegetables

Serves 10

  • 2.25 kg quality shoulder of lamb, bone in

  • olive oil

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 whole bulb garlic, broken into cloves

  • 1 handful fresh rosemary sprigs

  • 2 red onions, peeled and quartered

  • 3 carrots, peeled and roughly chopped

  • 2 sticks celery, cut into pieces

  • 1 large leek, or 2-3 baby leeks, trimmed and cut into pieces

  • 1 handful ripe tomatoes, halved

  • 2 fresh bay leaves

  • 1 handful fresh thyme sprigs

  • 2 x 400 g tinned plum tomatoes

  • 1 bottle red wine

Preheat your oven to 200ºC/400ºF/gas 6. Rub the lamb with oil, sea salt and freshly ground black pepper and put it into a roasting tray. Using a sharp knife, make small incisions all over the lamb and poke rosemary leaves and some quartered cloves of garlic into each one. This will give great flavour to the meat. Add the rest of the garlic cloves, the onions, carrots, celery, leeks and fresh tomatoes to the tray, then tuck the remaining herbs under the meat.



Pour the tinned tomatoes over the top, followed by the wine. Cover the tray tightly with a double layer of foil and put it into the oven. Turn down the oven temperature to 170ºC/325ºF/gas 3 and cook for 3½ to 4 hours, or until the lamb is soft, melting and sticky and you can pull it apart with a fork. Gently break up the meat, pull out the bones, and extract any herb stalks. Squeeze the garlic out of the skins and mush it in. Shred the lamb, check the seasoning and serve with some crispy roast potatoes.

Nutritional Information

Slow-cooked shoulder of lamb with roasted vegetables

Bags of lovely Mediterranean flavour

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Serves 10
4h 20m
Super easy
Method

This is a recipe that I first made as an alternative to roasting a leg of lamb. I wanted to save time and make my own gravy, so I turned it into a pot roast by adding vegetables and wine. I think shoulder of lamb is one of the best cuts by far – it's tastier than leg and much more economical.

Preheat your oven to 200ºC/400ºF/gas 6. Rub the lamb with oil, sea salt and freshly ground black pepper and put it into a roasting tray. Using a sharp knife, make small incisions all over the lamb and poke rosemary leaves and some quartered cloves of garlic into each one. This will give great flavour to the meat. Add the rest of the garlic cloves, the onions, carrots, celery, leeks and fresh tomatoes to the tray, then tuck the remaining herbs under the meat.

Pour the tinned tomatoes over the top, followed by the wine. Cover the tray tightly with a double layer of foil and put it into the oven. Turn down the oven temperature to 170ºC/325ºF/gas 3 and cook for 3½ to 4 hours, or until the lamb is soft, melting and sticky and you can pull it apart with a fork. Gently break up the meat, pull out the bones, and extract any herb stalks. Squeeze the garlic out of the skins and mush it in. Shred the lamb, check the seasoning and serve with some crispy roast potatoes.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 1156 58%
  • Carbs 9.3g 4%
  • Sugar 7.7g 9%
  • Fat 37.0g 53%
  • Saturates 13.8g 69%
  • Protein 70.5g 156%
Of an adult woman's guideline daily amount

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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