perfect pancakes - stack of pancakes with butter and syrup

On a recent shopping trip, my son was taken aback by the boxes of pancake mix on the store shelf. “Why would anyone need a mix for pancakes?” he asked me. “They’re so easy.”

He’s not wrong. Recipes like Jamie’s brilliant One-cup pancakes are easy enough to mean this beloved breakfast dish can be quickly made from scratch. In fact, my six-year-old prepped the very pancakes in these photographs, which we cooked and ate together.

Over the years I’ve taught my children the art of the pancake, so they are well versed in their preparation. As with many simple dishes, there are subtle tweaks you can make that will make them extra-special and I’m sharing my best with you today.

Haul out your cast iron pan and dig out your measuring spoons, because it’s time to cook a stack of pancakes.

Mixing

Skip the white flour and feature whole grain ingredients instead. Try spelt, oat, or whole-wheat flour. We love my recipe for fluffy Buttermilk buckwheat pancakes so much that they made the cover of my new cookbook.

Both butter and buttermilk also contribute significantly to the flavour of pancakes. In my opinion, they are both a necessity. Buttermilk contributes a subtle tang and butter adds sweetness.

Use a light hand and don’t overbeat the batter. As much as I love to involve my children in making pancakes, I like to take over when it is time to combine the wet and the dry ingredients. It only takes a few gentle folds – and don’t worry about the lumps.

Frying

Fry the pancakes immediately after mixing. The buttermilk will react with the baking soda, giving you pancakes that puff nicely when they hit the pan. The longer the batter sits around, the less height you will get.

perfect pancakes

A cast iron pan over steady, medium-low heat is the best choice of pan for frying perfect pancakes. Cast iron distributes heat very well, which allows for even cooking on the pancake surface.

I use basic cooking oil for frying pancakes. Butter gets added at the table, but it makes the pan smoke if used for cooking. A silicone brush is handy for applying a thin coating of oil to the pan.

To make sure the pan is hot enough, drop a dab of batter into the pan. It should make a satisfying sizzle.

Flip when you see the bubbles pop on the top of the pancake. Don’t press down on the pancake or flip repeatedly, or they will be dense.

Storing

To keep pancakes hot, preheat an oven to 80°C/170°F and place a baking sheet on the rack. As the pancakes come out of the frying pan, transfer them to the baking sheet in the oven and cover them with a clean tea towel to keep them from drying out.

About 15 minutes is an ideal holding time for pancakes – then serve them with a good drizzle of your favourite homemade syrup.

Freezing

We’re seldom without a stack of cooked pancakes in the freezer, ready and waiting for a quick snack or breakfast on the go. They actually freeze and reheat very well.

Cool the pancakes on a wire rack. Line a baking sheet with a sheet of parchment paper. Place a layer of pancakes on the baking sheet, leaving a little space in between each. Cover pancakes with another sheet of parchment and place a second layer, if needed. Place in the freezer.

Freeze for at least 6 hours, or until solid, before removing from the freezer. Working quickly, transfer the pancakes to freezer-quality resealable bags.

Label the bags with the date, then place the pancakes in the freezer and store for up to three months.

Re-heating

Pop pancakes in a toaster until warm and a little crispy around the edges (my preferred quick method for 1-2 pancakes).

Alternately, preheat an oven to 180°C/350°F. Place pancakes on a wire rack and bake for 7-10 minutes, or until they are hot and a little crispy at the edges. Serve at once.

For more ideas, have a look at Jamie’s Pancake Day recipes, or even try out these incredible pancake toppings.


About the author

Aimée Wimbush-Bourque

Aimée Wimbush-Bourque is a former chef, food writer and Montreal urban homesteader. She writes the award-winning food blog Simple Bites, named “Best Kids’ Cooking Blog” by Saveur Magazine, where she chronicles her kitchen adventures with simple recipes, savvy cooking tips, vibrant photography and lively stories. She is also the author of the new cookbook "Brown Eggs and Jam Jars: Family recipes from the kitchen of Simple Bites" (Penguin, 2015). Aimée is wife to Danny, mama to Noah, Mateo & Clara, boss of two cats, and farmer of six brown hens. For more whole foods inspiration and everyday delicious chit-chat, follow Aimée on Twitter and Instagram.

Aimée Wimbush-Bourque