Amazing Yorkies

Perfectly golden & crisp

Amazing Yorkies

Serves Makes 12
Time Cooks In30 minutes
DifficultyNot too tricky
Nutrition per serving Plus
  • Calories 73 4%
  • Fat 4.3g 6%
  • Saturates 0.8g 4%
  • Sugars 0.5g 1%
  • Salt 0.2g 3%
  • Protein 2.3g 5%
  • Carbs 6.9g 3%
  • Fibre 0.3g -
Of an adult's reference intake
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Ingredients

  • vegetable oil
  • 2 large free-range eggs
  • 100 g plain flour
  • 100 ml milk
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Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 225°C/425°F/gas 9.
  2. Get yourself a cupcake tin and add a tiny splash of vegetable oil into each of the 12 compartments.
  3. Pop into the oven for 10 to 15 minutes so the oil gets really hot.
  4. Meanwhile, beat the eggs, flour, milk and a pinch of salt and pepper together in a jug until light and smooth.
  5. Carefully remove the tray from the oven, then confidently pour the batter evenly into the compartments.
  6. Pop the tray back in the oven to cook for 12 to 15 minutes, or until risen and golden.

FAQs

Can I use self-raising flour instead of plain flour for Yorkshire puddings?

We wouldn’t recommend using self-raising flour, as, believe it or not, it can result in a flat Yorkshire pudding. Plain flour is best for well-risen, puffy Yorkies. It’s actually the combination of hot oil and the subsequent steam that makes them rise, which is why it’s important your oil is sizzling when you add the batter and you don’t open the door while they’re cooking.

Is vegetable oil the best for making Yorkshire puddings?

Yes, vegetable and sunflower oils work best, as they have a high smoke point, which means they will reach those high heats without burning and changing taste. Beef dripping, lard or goose fat are other flavourful options that can be used instead of oil that will add an extra dimension of taste.

Why don’t my Yorkshire puddings rise?

It’s a common problem, so rest assured you’re not alone. One of the main reasons why Yorkshires don’t rise is because the oil isn’t hot enough, so make sure it’s bubbling and sizzling as you pour your batter in. Make sure you aren’t over-filling the tin – fill each hole about a third or halfway up, any more and they may collapse through the weight of batter. And finally, no peeking! Once the batter is in the oven, set a timer and don’t open the oven door until the cooking time is up, as this might cause them to deflate.