1. Artichoke
  2. Asparagus
  3. Aubergine
  4. Avocado
  5. Beansprouts
  6. Beetroot
  7. Broad beans
  8. Broccoli
  9. Brussels sprouts
  10. Butternut squash
  11. Cabbage
  12. Carrots
  13. Cauliflower
  14. Cavolo Nero
  15. Celery
  16. Chard
  17. Chicory
  18. Chillies
  19. Climbing Beans
  20. Courgettes
  21. Cucumber
  22. Fennel
  23. Garlic
  24. Ginger
  25. Green beans
  26. Horseradish
  27. Jerusalem Artichoke
  28. Kale
  29. Leeks
  30. Lettuce
  31. Mushrooms
  32. Okra
  33. Onions
  34. Pak Choi
  35. Parsnips
  36. Peas
  37. Peppers
  38. Plantain
  39. Potatoes
  40. Radicchio
  41. Radishes
  42. Rhubarb
  43. Rocket
  44. Spinach
  45. Sugar Snap Peas
  46. Swede
  47. Sweet potatoes
  48. Sweetcorn
  49. Tomatoes
  50. Turnips
  51. Wasabi
  52. Watercress
  53. Yam
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. F
  5. G
  6. H
  7. J
  8. K
  9. L
  10. M
  11. O
  12. P
  13. R
  14. S
  15. T
  16. W
  17. Y

How to cook Ginger

Grate fresh ginger into marinades or dipping sauces, use in curries and stir-fries or blitz into smoothies for added zing and spice. Or slice it and brew in a mug of hot water for ginger-infused tea.

 

HOW TO PREPARE GINGER

READ: 6 reasons we love ginger

 

WHAT IS GINGER?

With its warm spice, ginger is used in a vast variety of cooking styles and is a key ingredient for both sweet and savoury dishes. Ginger is a flowering plant and is related to turmeric, cardamom and galangal.

 

WHEN IS GINGER IN SEASON?

Ginger is available all year round.

 

HOW TO STORE GINGER

Ginger can be stored at room temperature, unless it has been peeled or cut, in which case it should be refrigerated.


What are the health benefits?

Punchy and fragrant, warming and spicy, fresh ginger is a good source of potassium, so it's great for our nervous systems. It also helps to maintain normal blood pressure… Plus it's supposedly an aphrodisiac, too!