1. Artichoke
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  4. Avocado
  5. Beansprouts
  6. Beetroot
  7. Broad beans
  8. Broccoli
  9. Brussels sprouts
  10. Butternut squash
  11. Cabbage
  12. Carrots
  13. Cauliflower
  14. Celery
  15. Chard
  16. Chicory
  17. Chillies
  18. Climbing Beans
  19. Courgettes
  20. Cucumber
  21. Fennel
  22. Garlic
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  24. Green beans
  25. Horseradish
  26. Jerusalem Artichoke
  27. Kale
  28. Leeks
  29. Lettuce
  30. Mushrooms
  31. Okra
  32. Onions
  33. Pak Choi
  34. Parsnips
  35. Peas
  36. Peppers
  37. Plantain
  38. Potatoes
  39. Radicchio
  40. Radishes
  41. Rhubarb
  42. Rocket
  43. Spinach
  44. Sugar Snap Peas
  45. Swede
  46. Sweet potatoes
  47. Sweetcorn
  48. Tomatoes
  49. Turnips
  50. Wasabi
  51. Watercress
  52. Yam
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How to cook Parsnips

Parsnips are often sliced into wedges then roasted, or boiled then mashed. You can add parsnip to stews, soups, curries and casseroles. Or slice thinly to make parsnip crisps. With larger parsnips, you may find it necessary to slice out the woody core of the root.

WATCH: Parsnip & pancetta tagliatelle

READ: Action stations: growing parsnips

DID YOU KNOW?

Parsnips are a root vegetable. They are part of a family of plants called Apiaceae, which includes carrots, parsley, coriander and celery.

Parsnips are said to have better flavour after they have experienced a winter frost.


What are the health benefits?

Parsnips are a source of folate. Folate helps to reduce tiredness and fatigue so we can stay alert and awake.