1. Artichoke
  2. Asparagus
  3. Aubergine
  4. Avocado
  5. Beansprouts
  6. Beetroot
  7. Broad beans
  8. Broccoli
  9. Brussels sprouts
  10. Butternut squash
  11. Cabbage
  12. Carrots
  13. Cauliflower
  14. Cavolo Nero
  15. Celeriac
  16. Celery
  17. Chard
  18. Chicory
  19. Chillies
  20. Climbing Beans
  21. Courgettes
  22. Cucumber
  23. Fennel
  24. Garlic
  25. Ginger
  26. Green beans
  27. Horseradish
  28. Jerusalem Artichoke
  29. Kale
  30. Kohlrabi
  31. Leeks
  32. Lettuce
  33. Mushrooms
  34. Okra
  35. Onions
  36. Pak Choi
  37. Parsnips
  38. Peas
  39. Peppers
  40. Plantain
  41. Potatoes
  42. Radicchio
  43. Radishes
  44. Rhubarb
  45. Rocket
  46. Spinach
  47. Spring Onions
  48. Sugar Snap Peas
  49. Swede
  50. Sweet potatoes
  51. Sweetcorn
  52. Tomatoes
  53. Turnips
  54. Wasabi
  55. Watercress
  56. Yam
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. F
  5. G
  6. H
  7. J
  8. K
  9. L
  10. M
  11. O
  12. P
  13. R
  14. S
  15. T
  16. W
  17. Y

How to cook Plantain

When plantains are green and hard you can boil them and eat them like potatoes. However, they are best when ripe and softer – bake them whole or slice them and shallow fry them to get all the delicious sweet flavours.

WATCH: How to fry plantain

READ: Costa Rica: crispy plantain chips & dips

 

WHAT ARE PLANTAINS?

Although plantains are fruits, they’re classified as ‘starchy carbs’, alongside potatoes. Plantains are also known as ‘cooking bananas’. They can be eaten at any stage of ripening.

 

WHEN ARE PLANTAINS IN SEASON?

Plantains are available all year round.

 

HOW TO STORE PLANTAIN

Plantain should be left to ripen at room temperature, but then moved to the fridge once fully ripe. They can also be frozen.


What are the health benefits?

Plantains are a source of potassium, vitamin B6 and vitamin C. They don't count towards one of our 5-a-day though, as they are classified in the starchy carb food group.