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#1 Sat 30 Dec 06 4:10am

Anna

Forum champ
From Switzerland
Member since Fri 15 Apr 05

The Times/Prue Leith

Just spotted this in the paper and thought it might be of interest.

http://women.timesonline.co.uk/article/ … 47,00.html

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#2 Sun 31 Dec 06 4:10am

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: The Times/Prue Leith

Hmm - probably a good choice - we shall have to see.

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#3 Sun 31 Dec 06 7:23am

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: The Times/Prue Leith

I agree with Pru, I think that cookery lessons should be compulsary in schools, but good basic cookery skills not using tinned/jars of ingredients.
I think a lot of people are worried about cooking from fresh on a daily basis which is ,after all what our parents and grandparents used to do!

She did not seem impressed with the £15 thousand /year salery though.

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#4 Sat 20 Jan 07 8:54pm

Arthur

Member
From Hampshire
Member since Thu 09 Jun 05

Re: The Times/Prue Leith

Interesting that the School Food Trust has done little other than come up with the idea of training conferences for already trained cooks (other than those who work for schools running their own school meal services), press for cookery lessons as part of the school curriculum and promote packed lunches from home.

The school food trust is a strategic organisation set up to improve and enhance all school meals. So its priorties should be:

1. Pushing the Government to legally ban all packed lunches from home
2. Pushing Government to make itb illegal to degrade existing school meal
    provision and that  all schools must provide a hot meal provision
3. Make sure that all providers train their cooks to the required standard
    by an inspection regime and inforamtion collection
4. Advertise school meals on the television to compete with the food
    companies advertising the unhealthy snacks
5. Push the Government for free school meals for all children attending 
   school
6.  Push the Government to enforce all foods sold or supplied to the general population meets minimum nutritional standards
7 Push for and devise an national school meal menu with recipes and cooking procedures
8. I agree with Cookery Classes as part of the curriculum using school kitchens and school cooks to help deliver
9. Push for  more sporting and exercise regimes as the school curriculum
10. Push for setting up national supply of food produce incorporating regional contracts for local produce from local and regional growers
11 Push for basic nutrition as part of the school curriculum.
12. And set up Role Models to get children and their parents to eat more healthily.

I am sure some of you may think that this too nanny and against your human rights- I do not- you children are your future. Thye will pay for your pension, they will make elect Governments, etc, to make new laws that will affect you in your old age. As farther keeps reminding me his father pad the taxes to ensure his health and wellbeing were assured and that what he done and what he expects me to do for my children. Ironic the people in power now seem to what to take that away from our children and you are allowing them.

As parents push harder a nd get the School Food Trust to concrete on the list I have written- this is better for the children, better for the local producers, better for the future health of the nation and our future prosperity.

Cheers

Arthur

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#5 Sat 20 Jan 07 8:59pm

oliviascotland

Forum champ
From Scotland
Member since Wed 06 Apr 05

Re: The Times/Prue Leith

One thing you missed out, Arthur, is to make the Government force schools to cater for ALL allergies of children in the respective schools.  Currently this is optional for schools and education authorities, so many children have to take packed lunches to school or, literally, risk their lives.

Otherwise, I think your list is good.

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#6 Sun 21 Jan 07 12:38am

Arthur

Member
From Hampshire
Member since Thu 09 Jun 05

Re: The Times/Prue Leith

Not a problem- all LEAs produce meals that facilitate for most allegeries- as long as there is medical evidence to support that the child has this or that allegery.

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#7 Sun 21 Jan 07 1:55pm

oliviascotland

Forum champ
From Scotland
Member since Wed 06 Apr 05

Re: The Times/Prue Leith

Wish you'd tell that to my daughter's education authority, then - as they will not provide food for her even though she has medically proven, life threatening allergies .... Nor will they provide for any of the other children with allergies.  We, as parents, are told that we must provide all food our children eat at school, including lunch, break, drinks etc.  So packed lunches are the only option, otherwise our children would have nothing to eat at all.

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#8 Thu 01 Mar 07 1:09pm

Arthur

Member
From Hampshire
Member since Thu 09 Jun 05

Re: The Times/Prue Leith

For all of those interested in improving your children's education and behaviour- the Miracle of School Meals. Her is the Evidence and now it is time for The School Food Trust to put pressure on Government to provide free healthy school meals for all.        



"Study proves school meals help learning

Anushka Asthana
Sunday January 21, 2007
The Observer
Children who ate healthy school meals instead of packed lunches scored higher marks in tests, were less disruptive and concentrated longer in the classroom.
A study involving thousands of pupils and hundreds of parents and schoolteachers has confirmed the theory that transforming a child's diet improves how they learn and behave.
Two years after Hull City Council offered free, nutritionally balanced lunches to all young children in primary and special schools, the city is experiencing calmer classrooms, where children are more enthusiastic and more confident socially.
Of the 24,000 pupils eligible, 15,600 opted for the healthy meals, while 8,400 went on with packed lunches. Those who chose school dinners performed better in tests, taken four times over the school day. Hull has one of the worst records in the country for obesity and poor health.
'There has been a significant impact in all areas of children's schooling: from behaviour, social relationships, health and learning,' said Professor Derek Colquhoun, director of the Institute for Learning at Hull University, who will reveal the findings this week at a national conference. The study also revealed better punctuality and attendance. 'Children were more relaxed, more alert, more calm and less irritable.'

09.11.2006: Prue Leith to head healthy school meals campaign

Jamie Oliver's campaign
08.09.2006: Jamie Oliver returns to the TV fray over school dinners
17.05.2006: School dinner firms feel the cost of parental backlash
14.07.2006: Primary schools 'failing to meet healthy food standards'
29.08.2006: Pupils picking up junk food habit on way to school"





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#9 Thu 01 Mar 07 1:44pm

Arthur

Member
From Hampshire
Member since Thu 09 Jun 05

Re: The Times/Prue Leith

Here is another reason why school dinners schould be free at school. Children with packed lunches from home contain more slat than they need.

"Salty bread 'is putting 7,000 lives a year at risk'


High levels of salt in supermarket bread are putting up to 7,000 lives a year at risk, claims a damning study by health campaigners.
Bread is the largest source of salt in the British diet and excessive consumption can lead to increased blood pressure and a greater risk of heart attack.
The pressure group behind the study, Consensus Action on Salt and Health, yesterday called on shoppers to boycott breads with the highest levels of salt.
Researchers from the group surveyed 138 widely available loaves. They found that more than one in three contained salt levels above the Government's target of 1.1g per 100g.
The highest level was found in Morrison's The Best Farmhouse Malted Bread, which had a level of 1.5g per 100g or 0.7g per slice.
Just over four slices would put a child of six over the maximum daily recommended salt intake of 3g. Nine slices would take someone over the adult threshold of 6g.
The second highest salt reading was found in several Asda loaves, which had a level of 0.6g per slice. Eating just five of these would put a child over the recommended limit.
A total of 15 out of 18 Warburton products had a salt content higher than the Government's target, while all of the Sainsbury's and Waitrose breads surveyed were below.
Professor Graham MacGregor, chairman of Cash and an expert on medicine, said: 'Research has shown that a population cut of 1g of salt per day would equate to 7,000 lives saved each year from strokes and heart attacks, due to the drop in blood pressure that would occur.'
He called on the public to boycott bread which has more than 1.1g of salt per 100g.
A spokesman for the British Heart Foundation, Ruairi O'Connor, said: 'This research shows that despite some progress in reducing salt levels in bread, there remain wide variations in how much is contained across similar products.
'The BHF would like all breads to contain as little salt as possible, in order to reduce the nation's salt intake.
'People who are at risk of heart disease caused by high blood pressure need to reduce salt in their diets, and need to be able to quickly and accurately choose lower salt options when shopping.'
The charity is calling for the industry to adopt the traffic light labelling system developed by the Food Standards Agency. This uses red, amber and green logos to tell shoppers whether products are high, medium or low in salt, sugar and fat.
The Federation of Bakers said its members have made huge strides in reducing salt levels since 2005.
Its director, Gordon Polson, said the industry has agreed that bakers have until 2010 to reach the target of
1.1g of salt per 100g. He added: 'There has already been a ten per cent reduction in the two years to the end of 2005, and further reductions will be made to meet the 2010 target.' "

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