Jamie Oliver

forum: Food & Drink

Subscribe to forums RSS

#1 Thu 01 Feb 07 3:55pm

robocap

Member
Member since Thu 01 Feb 07

use of creme fraiche

Hello people,

I just bought Jamies latest book cooking with Jamie (i'm dutch, so i bought the dutch translation).
By the recipes of dressings he describes creamy french dressing. He uses creme fraiche. My question is, is there an alternative for creme fraiche. In particular Huttenkasse. Is this product useable for mixing in dressings and sauces. wink

    Likes (0)

#2 Thu 01 Feb 07 8:34pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: use of creme fraiche

Huttenkasse - cottage cheese - is not like Creme Fraiche.

A possible substitute is natural yoghurt, or you can make creme fraiche as follows:-

Crème fraîche made with buttermilk

    * 1 tablespoon of buttermilk
    * 1 cup of heavy cream

Stir the buttermilk and cream together in a glass bowl. Cover it and allow it to sit out on the counter overnight to thicken.

Quick Method

    * 1 cup chilled sour cream
    * 1 cup chilled heavy cream

Whisk the sour cream and heavy cream together. You can use it immediately or allow it to sit out at room temperature for a few hours to thicken and sour a little more.

Another Method for crème fraîche

    * 2 tablespoons sour cream
    * 2 cups heavy cream

Combine the sour cream and heavy cream and mix together. Cover with a kitchen or paper towel and allow to sit out at room temperature overnight.

Other possible substitutes isto mix plain full fatyoghurt with thick cream, and allow to culture somewhere warm overnight.

Finally, for a quick fix, mix 500ml thick cream with 2 tablespoons of lemon juice.

    Likes (0)

#3 Sat 03 Feb 07 2:41am

angelishere

Member
Member since Fri 02 Feb 07

Re: use of creme fraiche

Is heavy cream just normal thick cream? oops  smile

    Likes (0)

#4 Sat 03 Feb 07 3:03am

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: use of creme fraiche

Yes - heavy cream is what we, in England, would call *double cream*.

The thicker the better smile

    Likes (0)

#5 Sat 03 Feb 07 4:56am

angelishere

Member
Member since Fri 02 Feb 07

Re: use of creme fraiche

Hi Geoffp, oh ok, im in Oz so i havent heard of double cream tongue so i reckon it must just be the normal thick cream we whip up to have with strawberries

    Likes (0)

#6 Sat 03 Feb 07 9:13pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: use of creme fraiche

Whipping cream is actually thinner than double cream. here is a comparative chart of fat content


                                    US fat           England fat 

Clotted Cream             --                  55%
Double Cream              --                 48%
Heavy Cream               36%             --           
Whipping Cream          30%             35%
Whipped Cream           --                  35%
Single Cream /             18%             18%
Light Cream
Half Cream /                12%              12%
Half and Half

    Likes (0)

#7 Sun 04 Feb 07 9:53am

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: use of creme fraiche

Creme fraiche is a sour creme product.
It's similar to a thick/rich sour creme (although probably a bit creamier.) In Germany the best replacement is "schmand" (my German-Dutch dictionary doesn't have that, sorry) as our sour cream (saure Sahne/Sauerrahm) is thinner than eg. in America. Mixing sour cream and cream - even heavy cream - seemed to get more watery in hot dishes though probably would be alright in a cold salad dressing.
You can get Creme fraiche in any German supermarket (it came out about 20 years ago) though, so that I'ld be really surprised if you didn't have it in the Netherlands.

    Likes (0)

#8 Sun 04 Feb 07 5:32pm

Anna

Forum champ
From Switzerland
Member since Fri 15 Apr 05

Re: use of creme fraiche

In Switzerland you can buy it everywhere, too.  It's just called Frischkäse.  You can often buy it flavoured with fruit or herbs, but the plain kind is sold in every supermarket.

    Likes (0)

Powered by PunBB.