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#1 Wed 28 Mar 07 1:54pm

Maree

Forum champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Euro measurements

Am a bit rusty with my Euro measurements.
One recipe calls for "3Dl".
From memory/guessing, a decilitre is 10ml (2 teasoons).
So does my guess that 3dl equals 30 ml (2 Euro/US tabs) provide correct?
Thanks!
Maree


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
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#2 Wed 28 Mar 07 3:59pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Re: Euro measurements

Your memory has failed you, I'm afraid

1 litre = 10 decilitres          (1 l = 10 dl)
1 decilitre = 10 centilitres   (1 dl = 10 cl)
1 centilitre = 10 milliltres    (1 cl = 10 ml)

1 teaspoon = 5 millilitres
1 dessertspoon = 10 millilitres
1 tablespoon = 15 millilitres

3 dl = 300ml (just over 1/2 Imperial pint)

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#3 Wed 28 Mar 07 4:21pm

Maree

Forum champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Re: Euro measurements

Glad I checked, Geoff. Thanks for the heads up.

Why in the world do we have metric,imperical and deci-measurements (for want of a better term?".

No doubt, I'd have worked it out from the results but thanks for saving me the time and hassle.

Maree.


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
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#4 Thu 29 Mar 07 8:42am

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Re: Euro measurements

Hiya again.

Ah - measurement - so impotant, but so confusing!

We have two basic systems of measurement - fractionation and decimalization.

The traditional systems are fractional, the modern system is decimal.

The two remaining fractional systems in general use are the Imperial and tye American system. The only decimal system is the Metric system.

The Imperial and the American systems both use the same names  for weights and volumes, but these refer to different absolute weights and volumes. The Metric system is entirely self consistent

In cooking, the The Imperial system generally uses weight for dry measures, and volume for liquid measures, while tge American system uses volume for both. The Metric system uses weight for dry and volume for liquid measures.

(As an aside, my speculation is that Americans use volume for all culinary measures because, during the Ametican expansion westwards, which co-incided with the period during which recipe formats were being standardized, it was easier to measure by volume [everybody had cups and spoons], than by weight, which depended on having weighing scales and sets of calibrated weights).

All systems are internally consistent, but for any recipe, you need to stick to a single system throughout. This is why recipes are sometimes printed with three equivalent sets of measurements.

Confusing? - Yes! - but each to their own.

And then, of ciurse, there are the two (three) different systems for measuring temperature. Fahrenheit, Celcius (and Kelvin).

Fahrenheit is generally used by those who use fractional systems, Celsius (and Kelvin) is/are used by those who use the decimal system.

All systems are based on the difference between the freezing point andboilong pount of water. Thus in fahrenheit there are 180 degrees between thefreezing point (32 degrees F), and the boiling point (212 degrees F), while in Centigrade there are 100 degrees between the freezing point (0 degrees C) and tye boiling point (100 degrees C). Kelvin isn't generaly used in cooking - it has the same divisions as Centigrade, but starts at the equivalent of  -273.15 degrees C, which is absolute zero, the lowest possible  tenperature.

Aaaargh - this sounds as if it is getting too complicated!

But fortunately, cooking isn't an exact science, so absolute accuracy isn't called for. A digital weghing scale, calibrated in both Imperial and metric, and a measuring jug, calibratd in both units, is all you need.

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#5 Thu 29 Mar 07 9:42am

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Re: Euro measurements

beautiful geoff, most people stop at -273C for absolute zero; i'm impressed

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#6 Thu 29 Mar 07 10:32am

Maree

Forum champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Re: Euro measurements

Geoff we (in Oz) mainly use metric- older and imported books may use imperical (or both)

Were you aware that an Australian tablespoon contains 20ml (not the Euro/American 15ml)?


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
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#7 Thu 29 Mar 07 11:05am

Maree

Forum champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Re: Euro measurements

PS. I agree that cooking, generally is not an exacting science/art. Baking, however, is less forgiving than most foods.


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
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#8 Thu 29 Mar 07 11:12am

Sereh

Member
Occupation mothering my toddler
From The Netherlands
Member since Thu 20 Jan 05

Re: Re: Euro measurements

Hi GeoffP, thanks for that interesting article! It looks like you wrote it from the top of your head: very impressive!

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