forum: Food & Drink

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#1 Fri 02 Nov 07 5:38am

Carcuss

Member
Occupation student of life
From Gold Coast Queensland, Oz
Member since Thu 07 Jun 07

Terrines.

G'day folks.  Am having a family do at Christmas time and wanted to make a terrine.  Trouble is I've never made one before.  My old Dad can't eat chicken livers and other offal.  Does anyone have any recipes they could share?  I googled and found a few recipes but most had chicken livers in the recipe.  Can anyone help me please?
Cheers,
Carcuss. big_smile

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#2 Fri 02 Nov 07 6:24am

VENUS

Forum champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Terrines.

Halibut and Salmon Fish Terrine   

  Ingredients :

2 lb Halibut fillets, skinned and boned
1 lb Salmon fillets, skinned and boned
3 tbl Vegetable oil,
4 med Spanish onions, peeled and diced
4 lrg Eggs
6 tbl Matzoh meal
1 tbl Salt, or to taste
2 tsp Ground white pepper
2 tbl Sugar
1 tbl Lemon juice
2 tbl Snipped dill, plus more for garnish
2 lrg Carrots, peeled
    Parsley for garnish

Method :
Preheat the oven to 325F. Cut the fish into big chunks and pulse in processor about 20 times: do not puree, but grind fine. Place in the bowl of an electric mixer.
Heat oil in a large frying pan, and wilt onions. Let cool.
To the fish mixture, add the onions, eggs, 2 c of cold water, matzoh meal, salt, white pepper, sugar, and lemon juice. Beat in an electric mixer on med for about 10 min. Add the dill, and grate in the carrots; mix well, using a paddle attachment.
Pour the mixture into a greased 12-c bundt pan. Smooth the top with a spatula, and cover with foil. Place in a larger pan filled with water that is almost boiling.
Bake in the oven for 1 hr, or until the center is solid. Cool for 5 min, or until mold is cool to the touch. Run a knife around the edges. Place a flat serving plate on top, then flip over, inverting onto the plate. If the mold doesn't come out easily, give the plate a shake. You should feel or hear it give.
Refrigerate for several hr or overnight. Slice as you would a torte, and serve as an appetizer. Garnish with the parsley and remaining dill, and serve with red horseradish.

Asparagus and Bacon Terrine   

Ingredients :

3 bn asparagus, trimmed
5 x eggs
1 pch cayenne and nutmeg
    salt and pepper
3 tbl grated parmesan
2 tbl cream
5 x rashers thinly sliced bacon, trimmed

Method :
1. Pre-heat oven to 180deg.C. Generously butter a terrine dish or line with Glad Bake.
2. Place asparagus in microwave-proof dish and cook on HIGH for 2 minutes - thick asparagus may take longer. Remove and cool under running water. Drain and place in a tea towel to dry.
3. Break eggs into a small bowl and add the seasoning, cheese and cream and beat until combined. Line the prepared terrine with the bacon rashers. Pour 2 tablespoons of egg mixture into the base of the dish. Top with a layer of asparagus and continue layering until all ingredients are used, finishing with the egg mixture. Cover with bacon strips, trimming any excess.
4. Bake in oven for about 25 minutes, or until the egg has set and the terrine is light golden on top. Remove from oven and allow the temperature to reduce to warm before unmoulding.

Aubergine, Pepper and Goat Cheese Terrine   

Ingredients :

2 lrg Aubergine stems removed
    Olive oil
    Salt to taste
    Freshly-ground black pepper to taste
2/3 cup Pitted olives
2 tbl Drained, rinsed capers
1 tbl Chopped parsley
1 tbl Chopped chives
1 tbl Chopped basil
3 lrg Red or yellow bell peppers
8 oz Fresh goat cheese beaten with
2 tbl Buttermilk
1/2 cup Toasted pine nuts coarsely chopped
    Basil Oil
GARNISH
    Fresh herb salad
    Reduced balsamic vinegar

Method :
Slice aubergine lengthwise into 1/2-inch slices and brush generously with olive oil. Season with salt and pepper and arrange in one layer on baking sheets and broil in batches about 4 inches from heat until aubergine is golden and tender. Transfer with a spatula to paper towels and allow to drain.
Combine the olives, capers and herbs in a bowl and set aside. Char the peppers and remove the charred skin with the point of a knife. Discard the stems and seeds and cut peppers lengthwise into wide strips.
Line a small 4-cup loaf pan or terrine with plastic wrap, leaving a 3 to 4-inch overhang. Arrange the aubergine, olive mixture, peppers, goat cheese and pine nuts in several layers, beginning and ending with the aubergine. Cover the aubergine with the plastic overhang and weight the terrine with a 4- to 5-pound weight, such as another loaf pan filled with canned goods, and chill in the refrigerator for 12 to 24 hours.
To unmold, remove the weights and invert the terrine onto a cutting board. Remove the pan and the plastic wrap and carefully cut slices with a serrated or electric knife. Place slices on chilled plates, and garnish with a small fresh herb salad, drizzles of Basil Oil and reduced balsamic vinegar.

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#3 Fri 02 Nov 07 7:51am

Carcuss

Member
Occupation student of life
From Gold Coast Queensland, Oz
Member since Thu 07 Jun 07

Re: Terrines.

Thanks for the recipes.  Was hoping for something a bit meatier.  I thought i'd do a terrine as a second meat dish for Christmas.  Will definitely try the Aubergine, Pepper and Goat Cheese one though.  If anybody has any more meaty recipes, I would be greatly chuffed.
Cheers,
Carcuss  thumbsup

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#4 Fri 16 Nov 07 4:24pm

Jamie

Chef
From Fifteen Restaurant, London
Member since Wed 24 Mar 04

Re: Terrines.

First of all chicken livers are the most incredible things, they are silky soft and they have wonderful flavour and they can also help to carry other flavours as well. Yes you can make Terrine pretty much out of any form of protein really because basically whether you are pureeing meat up or just cutting it up so it is course and chunky or using offal or meat, the whole process of slowly cooking a terrine in a tray of water (the French call it a Bain Marie),  so that it is quite a gentle cook, essentially you are cooking the protein. To be honest Terrine’s a not really my thing… I will try and dig out a decent recipe for you though (or the Forum users can add to this as well with their suggestions). But the big key is complimentary flavours, do you use lovely fried off shallots, do you ad anything like Pistachios or Truffles or Chestnuts and sometimes they add vege and bits and pieces like that. You can also wrap the mould in bacon so that you have that smokey flavour or Proscuitto, but for me the biggest thing is allot of protein when you cook it just goes dry, so actually that is why using things like Chicken Livers is brilliant because they are soft and creamy and a pleasure to eat. So whatever you do you are going to have to use some form of fatty cut of meat to make it soft and delicious. I tell you what I really like, it’s slightly going off the topic of Terrine but you might be able to make it in a Terrine mould and set it, is some form of Rillette, like a slow roasted shoulder of pork or whole slow roasted duck and basically you just scramble up all the meat with 2 forks to whatever texture you want, and then you add some chopped herbs, season it with some lemon juice or vinegar and then you add some of the fat that it has cooked in back and then you put it into a mould, put it in the fridge and then you have got essentially a version of Pate. I know that it sets pretty firm in a bowl, if you are obsessed about getting a Terrine shape then put it into a Terrine mould and it will also set to something half respectable.

Good on you Venus as well with your recommendation as well....

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#5 Fri 16 Nov 07 5:21pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Terrines.

A bit of history might help to understand the differences and similarities between terrines, rillettes and pâtés (all French)

A terrine is a glazed earthenware dish with the width and depth the same, and the length approx twice the width. It usually comes with a lid. The name terrine comes from terra cotta.

Terrine dishes are used for both rillettes and pâtés, and, by extension, also give their name to any variant of either prepared in one.

Generally, a terrine has distinct layers of meat, vegetables or fish, wheras a rillette or a pâté is homogenous.

Rillettes are prepared from meat gently cooked in fat and then shredded with enough of the fat to form a soft paste - the name rillette literally means "plank", and may have been derived from the way it is served, sliced and spread on toast. Rillettes are packed into the terrine dish cold, and covered with a layer of fat.

Pâtés - literally "pastes" are prepared from meat (often liver) and fat, which can be coarsely or finely ground. They differ from rillettes by being cooked in the oven in the terrine, which is usually set in a baine marie (mary's bath!) filled with water to make the cooking process more gentle. Pâtés can also be cooked in a pastry case, much the same shape as a terrine (Pâté en croute).

There are many variations on terrines, rillettes and pâtés, but they all follow these same general forms, even when prepared from fish or vegetables.

Last edited by GeoffP (Fri 16 Nov 07 5:25pm)

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#6 Sat 17 Nov 07 4:39am

mitmondol

Member
Member since Sun 08 Jul 07

Re: Terrines.

I make a very fancy looking pate with 2kinds of fish and scallops (have to dig out the recipe.)
But what I really like to do is the deboned whole bird stuffed with a meat farce and you can slice it beautifuly!
It is great to look at and even better to eat!
Yay, jamie comes to the forums!
Good for you deary! big_smile

Last edited by mitmondol (Sat 17 Nov 07 8:14am)

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#7 Sat 17 Nov 07 10:42am

Danny

Jamie Oliver Food Foundation
From Jamie's Office
Member since Tue 06 Jul 04

Re: Terrines.

Hi Geoff

Thanks for clarifying that it is spelt as Rillette

Cheers

Danny

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