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#1 Wed 05 Dec 07 6:57pm

DawnDawn

Member
Member since Wed 05 Dec 07

Gluten wheat allergy christmas cookie humbug.....

I really wish I understood flavours. I, like many more of us coming out of the woodworks, have discovered that I have a wheat/gluten allergy. Absolutly no white flour!!! I have to use rice, potato, or corn flour.  sad Also being the strong Sagittarius that I am, hehe, am lost in the kitchen. Now I am struggling to know how to bake on a budget and not have it taste like cardboard.
Help!!!!  help

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#2 Wed 05 Dec 07 7:52pm

oliviascotland

Forum champ
From Scotland
Member since Wed 06 Apr 05

Re: Gluten wheat allergy christmas cookie humbug.....

Hi Dawn

My daughter and my husband are both coeliacs, so I know what you're going through!  You can use rice, buckwheat, soya, potato, corn, tapioca and gram flours - or a mixture of them.  You can also buy varying generic gluten-free flour mixes.  If you're based in the UK, I'd suggest Dove's Organic as a place to start.

If you're able to eat dairy, you'll find you get better results on the taste stakes - it seems to lessen the "cardboard" effect.  However, I've not had much luck with baking breads gluten-free  sad

Experimentation is the way to go - for example when I make shortbread, I use rice flour instead of plain flour, and add an extra ounce of butter to the mix - most people don't even realise that it's not "normal" shortbread  lol   This was just a recipe that I adapted - nothing special.

First off, you'll find that most gluten-free flours soak up a bit more liquid than regular flour.  Then you'll notice that you don't get that "stretch".  But you can get around it.

Rice flour is very good for things like biscuits and cookies, as it has a light, short texture, and is not powdery.

Buckwheat flour is a love it or loathe it flavour - I use it in American-style breakfast pancakes, regular pancakes and for crumbles (i.e. apple/rhubarb crumble).

Gram flour (from chickpeas), is very strong tasting, but goes well in things like savoury sauces and, of course, Indian cooking.

Tapioca flour is also quite strong in flavour, but seems to settle down a little with cooking, and is good as a base to add other flours to.

Potato flour is also fantastic for sauces and thickening, and doesn't have too much taste.

Soya flour is useful, cornflour you probably know all about, and a generic gluten-free flour mix is invaluable.

Here are a couple of my tried and tested recipes for you:

American Style Pancakes

4oz rice flour
2oz gluten-free flour
2oz buckwheat flour
1 tspn sugar
generous pinch salt
1 tbspn gluten-free baking powder
2 eggs
300ml milk
2 large eggs, lightly mixed
30g butter, melted

Put the flour in a large bowl, and add the rest of the dried ingredients.  Stir, and make a well in the centre.  Drop in the eggs, and slowly start to draw in the flour - slowly start adding the milk.  When all the milk is added, beat the mixture until smooth and bubbles burst on the surface.  Add the butter, and beat in.  Leave to stand for 20 mins (very important!!).

In a frying pan, heat a little butter or sunflower oil, then pour in enough pancake mix to form a pancake the size of a CD.  Cook until loads of little bubbles burst, then turn over and cook for about 30 secs.  Remove to a warm plate if desired.  Keep going until all the batter is used.  We like to serve these with maple syrup and bacon, or with lemon juice and sugar.   They're also good cold with a little butter and jam  yummy   Or as a base for scrambled eggs - the list goes on .....

Shortbread

6oz rice flour
2oz cornflour
4oz caster sugar
7oz soft, unsalted butter
few drops vanilla essence

Put all the ingredients in a food processor and blitz until a ball is formed.  Knead into a greased baking tray, and prick all over with a fork.  Bake for 30 mins at 160C or until golden brown.  Cut into fingers whilst still hot, but do not remove from tray until cold. Watch these disappear  yummy

Chickpea Cake

This sounds horrible, but is really good - rather like a madeira cake in texture.

410g can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
4 eggs
5 - 8oz caster sugar (depending on taste)
zest & juice of a lemon (or a small orange or 2 limes)
Honey to drizzle

Put the chickpeas in a food processor and blitz until smooth.  Add the eggs, sugar, zest and half the juice, then blitz until a smooth batter is formed.  Pour into a greased and lined 2lb loaf tin and bake in the oven at 150C for 30 - 45 mins until risen, firm to the touch and golden brown.  Remove from the oven, drizzle over some honey, then leave for 15 mins.  Then drizzle over the rest of the juice and leave until cold.  Carefully remove the cake from the tin and the lining paper.  This will keep in a tin for at least a week.

Hope these give you some idea of how to adapt recipes.  There are lots of people on the forum who have the same restrictions as you, and you should get loads of help.

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#3 Thu 06 Dec 07 12:08pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Gluten wheat allergy christmas cookie humbug.....

This is a recipe for Christmas cookies that have no flour in them. They are a traditional here and my Dad's all time favorite wink

Cinnamon Stars

3 egg whites
250 g confectioner's sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
400 g ground almonds (NOT the blanched kind)

confectioner's sugar for the work surface

method:
Beat egg whites until stiff. Add sifted sugar little by little.
Put 2 well heaped tablespoons full to the side for later.
Carefully mix the remaining meringue slowly with cinnamon and half of the almonds. Knead in as much of the remaining almonds as needed until dough almost stops to stick.
Dust work surface with confectioner's sugar and roll out the dough to about 1 cm thick. Cut stars and put on a baking sheet lined with non stick paper.
Glaze stars with the remaining meringue and bake at 140°C for 25 min. (They must still be soft on the bottom side.)

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#4 Fri 07 Dec 07 1:53am

Cindy

Forum champ
Occupation Registered Nurse
From Adelaide, OZ
Member since Tue 03 Aug 04

Re: Gluten wheat allergy christmas cookie humbug.....

Olivia, I was just reading this and thinking that you start a thread for people to submit glutin free/coeliac recipes.Similar to stefanies silk road and my salad thread.

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#5 Fri 07 Dec 07 8:16am

oliviascotland

Forum champ
From Scotland
Member since Wed 06 Apr 05

Re: Gluten wheat allergy christmas cookie humbug.....

That's a good idea, Cindy  thumbsup  - shall try that one today!

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#6 Fri 07 Dec 07 10:48am

Punga

Member
Occupation Student
From BC
Member since Thu 08 Jul 04

Re: Gluten wheat allergy christmas cookie humbug.....

Peanut butter cookies:

1 c natural peanut butter
1/2 c granulated sugar
1/4 c brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
1 egg

Mix, roll into balls, flatten with fork, bake at 350 F. That's all you need. By far my favourite recipe, if you love peanut butter as much as I do.

This is also very good. Surprisingly pretty lean, considering it's Paula!
Coconut MacaroonsRecipe courtesy Paula Deen
3 cups shredded coconut
1 teaspoon almond extract
1/8 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup sweetened condensed milk
2 egg whites, stiffly beaten
1 teaspoon cream of tarter

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Combine coconut, extract and salt.  Mix in condensed milk to form a thick paste.  Fold in egg whites with cream of tarter.  Drop teaspoonfuls onto greased cookie sheets, about 2 inches apart.  Bake for about 8 minutes or until edges are lightly browned.

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#7 Fri 07 Dec 07 9:59pm

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Gluten wheat allergy christmas cookie humbug.....

As Olivia said, there are a fair few people here with gluten issues (as I like to put it - i.e. not all of us have coeliac disease but still encounter major issues with gluten and wheat).

Using the search function (up the top of the page) you should be able to find many of the previous threads relating to gluten free cooking. http://www.jamieoliver.com/forum/search … 86&p=2

Very fortunately we have a mine of information in Olivia and Cindy especially, they both cook for people who can't have gluten.

There are a load of gluten free cook books coming on to the market. Darina Allen's one seems good as is Pamela Moriaty's Sharing Sweet secrets gluten and wheat free (it's mostly cakes and desserts). Tobie Puttock's Daily Italian has gluten free variations on most recipes. I find Sue Shepard's books to be boring and uninspiring. They mostly contain main recipes which didn't seem to need to be changed to be gluten free.

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#8 Sat 08 Dec 07 5:25pm

DawnDawn

Member
Member since Wed 05 Dec 07

Re: Gluten wheat allergy christmas cookie humbug.....

Wow thanks to you all! It has been a struggle to re program my brain when it comes to eating, and i certainly pay more attention in reading labels. Something we should all do anyway right! The recipies look so yummy and i can't wait to try a few this weekend!

Thanks for your support my friends! big_smile

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#9 Fri 17 Oct 08 12:21am

gluten free

Member
Member since Wed 08 Oct 08

Re: Gluten wheat allergy christmas cookie humbug.....

This is great, all these recipes sound wonderful.  I have had little experience so far (only diagnosed coeliac in June this year) BUT desperation for bread led me to start baking (I always baked cakes before but never bread).  The first few attempts were a disaster! puke  BUT I carried on and now bake decent loaves, my daughter steals slices sometimes!  Below:

Cheat, use a breadmaker, get a decent one if you can.

for a medium loaf  you need:

410g brown gluten free bread flour (I stress the bread flour as this has xanathan gum added and makes a good loaf)
14g milk
2 eggs
6 table spoons of oil (sunflower is best)
1 teaspoon cider vinegar
2 tablespoons of sugar
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons quick yeast

Add the milk, eggs and oil and vinegar to a bowel and beat, then pour into bread maker (which can be set on medium gluten free, takes about two hours in mine)

then add flour, sugar and salt and stir gently in the bread maker pan with a wooden spoon, lastly sprinkle on the yeast and close and press go.

You should hang around as when the loaf is ready it needs to be removed from the maching as otherwise the condensation makes the loaf sag.  Be sure to store the loaf in silver foil or air tight container, ANY air dries it out immediately. 

I really thought I would never get the hang of it, but love my bread now, and if I can do it, anyone can. thumbsup

Also quick nut cake

cream one egg, it's weight in margarine or butter and sugar, slowly add the weight of the egg in gluten free white flour, a teaspoon of baking powder (check it is the gluten free type) and a few drops of milk.  Crush some mixed nuts, hazel nuts are best, and add them plus some sultanas (about half a cup full) and some vanilla drops (about four to six).  Beat to add air then place in an 8inch greased baking tin and bake on gas mark 5 for 15 - 20 minutes.  Top with butter cream or leave as it is.  if you cannot tolerate nuts, try dried apricots chopped and lemon and orange zest instead. Cut into squares and stored in an airtight container this cake lasts me about a week having one piece a day with a cup of tea  yummy  yummy   

Main thing is have a go and don't be afraid to cheat (ie breadmaker) having coeliacs is bad enough without suddenly having to try and be Mrs. Beaton! lol  lol

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#10 Sun 01 Feb 09 8:21am

ljbritt50

Member
Occupation Gluten Free Cooking Coach and College Cooking Instructor
From Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Member since Sat 03 Jan 09

Re: Gluten wheat allergy christmas cookie humbug.....

oliviascotland wrote:

Hi Dawn

My daughter and my husband are both coeliacs, so I know what you're going through!  You can use rice, buckwheat, soya, potato, corn, tapioca and gram flours - or a mixture of them.  You can also buy varying generic gluten-free flour mixes.  If you're based in the UK, I'd suggest Dove's Organic as a place to start.

If you're able to eat dairy, you'll find you get better results on the taste stakes - it seems to lessen the "cardboard" effect.  However, I've not had much luck with baking breads gluten-free  sad

Experimentation is the way to go - for example when I make shortbread, I use rice flour instead of plain flour, and add an extra ounce of butter to the mix - most people don't even realise that it's not "normal" shortbread  lol   This was just a recipe that I adapted - nothing special.

First off, you'll find that most gluten-free flours soak up a bit more liquid than regular flour.  Then you'll notice that you don't get that "stretch".  But you can get around it.

Rice flour is very good for things like biscuits and cookies, as it has a light, short texture, and is not powdery.

Buckwheat flour is a love it or loathe it flavour - I use it in American-style breakfast pancakes, regular pancakes and for crumbles (i.e. apple/rhubarb crumble).

Gram flour (from chickpeas), is very strong tasting, but goes well in things like savoury sauces and, of course, Indian cooking.

Tapioca flour is also quite strong in flavour, but seems to settle down a little with cooking, and is good as a base to add other flours to.

Potato flour is also fantastic for sauces and thickening, and doesn't have too much taste.

Soya flour is useful, cornflour you probably know all about, and a generic gluten-free flour mix is invaluable.

Here are a couple of my tried and tested recipes for you:

American Style Pancakes

4oz rice flour
2oz gluten-free flour
2oz buckwheat flour
1 tspn sugar
generous pinch salt
1 tbspn gluten-free baking powder
2 eggs
300ml milk
2 large eggs, lightly mixed
30g butter, melted

Put the flour in a large bowl, and add the rest of the dried ingredients.  Stir, and make a well in the centre.  Drop in the eggs, and slowly start to draw in the flour - slowly start adding the milk.  When all the milk is added, beat the mixture until smooth and bubbles burst on the surface.  Add the butter, and beat in.  Leave to stand for 20 mins (very important!!).

In a frying pan, heat a little butter or sunflower oil, then pour in enough pancake mix to form a pancake the size of a CD.  Cook until loads of little bubbles burst, then turn over and cook for about 30 secs.  Remove to a warm plate if desired.  Keep going until all the batter is used.  We like to serve these with maple syrup and bacon, or with lemon juice and sugar.   They're also good cold with a little butter and jam  yummy   Or as a base for scrambled eggs - the list goes on .....

Shortbread

6oz rice flour
2oz cornflour
4oz caster sugar
7oz soft, unsalted butter
few drops vanilla essence

Put all the ingredients in a food processor and blitz until a ball is formed.  Knead into a greased baking tray, and prick all over with a fork.  Bake for 30 mins at 160C or until golden brown.  Cut into fingers whilst still hot, but do not remove from tray until cold. Watch these disappear  yummy

Chickpea Cake

This sounds horrible, but is really good - rather like a madeira cake in texture.

410g can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
4 eggs
5 - 8oz caster sugar (depending on taste)
zest & juice of a lemon (or a small orange or 2 limes)
Honey to drizzle

Put the chickpeas in a food processor and blitz until smooth.  Add the eggs, sugar, zest and half the juice, then blitz until a smooth batter is formed.  Pour into a greased and lined 2lb loaf tin and bake in the oven at 150C for 30 - 45 mins until risen, firm to the touch and golden brown.  Remove from the oven, drizzle over some honey, then leave for 15 mins.  Then drizzle over the rest of the juice and leave until cold.  Carefully remove the cake from the tin and the lining paper.  This will keep in a tin for at least a week.

Hope these give you some idea of how to adapt recipes.  There are lots of people on the forum who have the same restrictions as you, and you should get loads of help.

...in response to the stretch or elasticity of non gluten containing flours, there are combinations of the ancient grains that will produce the elasticity. I'm not sure which ones are creating the effect, but in both my unleavened flat bread recipe and ancient grains bread recipes there is elasticity in the dough. It may be the teff and sorghum combo, or perhaps something to do with the amaranth and quinoa. but I honestly don't know.

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