Jamie Oliver

forum: Food & Drink

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#1 Fri 11 Jan 08 7:36am

Maree

Forum super champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Manicotti v Canneloni

Have noticed over the years that many North American recipes call what is descibed here as "canneloni", "manicotti".

Ate spinach and ricotta "manicotti" (as listed on the menu) recently. Couldn't tell the difference between it and spinach and ricotta "canneloni".

Is it a "regional" thing (like dialect) or *is* there a subtle difference that I am missing?

Just curious. Both are delicious, whatever called big_smile


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#2 Fri 11 Jan 08 10:05am

peekenjoo

Member
Member since Tue 25 Sep 07

Re: Manicotti v Canneloni

I know manicotti as a dessert, canneloni as a fresh pasta dish. Both look the same but the cannelonis are cooked, the manicotti are fried. But the idea is the same : a small pipe of dough filled with "good stuff".

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#3 Fri 11 Jan 08 11:07am

Maree

Forum super champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Manicotti v Canneloni

Hi, peekenjoo. Ashen (on the "what's for supper" thread said he was having spinach and ricotta manicotti) for dinner. I see (and taste) no difference from canneloni.

I am not confusing the yummy fried dessert of "cannoli" with the savoury manicotti/canneloni- I bake my canneloni using fresh lasagne sheets (rather than those dried "tubes" from the supermarket).

Thanks for responding, anyway smile


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#4 Fri 11 Jan 08 1:14pm

GeoffP

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Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Manicotti v Canneloni

Technically, cannelloni are fresh pasta or prepared lasagne sheets rolled into tubes - this is the original Italian way. Cannelloni can also be prepared using crespelle or crepes instead of pasta.

Manicotti are ready prepare pasta tubes (about 1" dia x 4" long), and are American rather than Italian in origin.

The Silver Spoon (cooking bible of all things Italian) details cannelloni, but doesn't mention manicotti.

I usually use fresh pasta or lasagne sheets, though I do also do an English equivalent (farmer's pancakes, fishermen's pancakes etc. etc.) using English pancakes.

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#5 Fri 11 Jan 08 2:17pm

Maree

Forum super champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Manicotti v Canneloni

Geoff, have the original Silver Spoon and its follow-up and was given the revised/updated Silver Spoon for Christmas.

So, using my usual method of fresh lasagne sheets rolled into "tubes" (have also used crepes rolled the same way) is OK ?

Have tried to use the supermarket "ready to go" tubes (same experience with "ready to go" (no "pre-cooking required") lasagne sheets, but have found that unless I douse the assembled dish with way too much sauce for our taste, they are still "chewy" on the edges.

So, manicotti and canneloni are (virtually) the same, it's a matter of semantics? Is that correct?

Thanks:)


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#6 Fri 11 Jan 08 2:33pm

Maree

Forum super champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Manicotti v Canneloni

Geoff (or someone else), how do you define "English pancakes"?

Are they "thicker" (like pasta dough) than crepes?


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#7 Fri 11 Jan 08 4:34pm

oanaH

Member
Occupation housewife
From Hungary
Member since Fri 19 Oct 07

Re: Manicotti v Canneloni

here is the scientific  smile explanation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manicotti

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#8 Fri 11 Jan 08 9:52pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Manicotti v Canneloni

English pancakes - or, as we would call them - pancakes are like crepes.

They can be sweet or savoury.

Here's the classic Shrove Tuesday recipe from Delia Smith

Ingredients
For the pancake mixture:
110g/4oz plain flour, sifted
pinch of salt
2 eggs
200ml/7fl oz milk mixed with 75ml/3fl oz water
50g/2oz butter
To serve:
caster sugar
lemon juice
lemon wedges

Method
Sift the flour and salt into a large mixing bowl with a sieve held high above the bowl so the flour gets a airing. Now make a well in the centre of the flour and break the eggs into it. Then begin whisking the eggs - any sort of whisk or even a fork will do - incorporating any bits of flour from around the edge of the bowl as you do so.

Next gradually add small quantities of the milk and water mixture, still whisking (don't worry about any lumps as they will eventually disappear as you whisk). When all the liquid has been added, use a rubber spatula to scrape any elusive bits of flour from around the edge into the centre, then whisk once more until the batter is smooth, with the consistency of thin cream. Now melt the 50g/2oz of butter in a pan. Spoon 2 tbsp of it into the batter and whisk it in, then pour the rest into a bowl anduse it to lubricate the pan, using a wodge of kitchen paper to smear it round before you make each pancake.

Now get the pan really hot, then turn the heat down to medium and, to start with, do a test pancake to see if you're using the correct amount of batter. I find 2 tbsp is about right for an 18cm/7in pan. It's also helpful if you spoon the batter into a ladle so it can be poured into the hot pan in one go. As soon as the batter hits the hot pan, tip it around from side to side to get the base evenly coated with batter. It should take only half a minute or so to cook; you can lift the edge with a palette knife to see if it's tinged gold as it should be. Flip the pancake over with a pan slice or palette knife - the other side will need a few seconds only - then simply slide it out of the pan onto a plate.
Stack the pancakes as you make them between sheets of greaseproof paper on a plate fitted over simmering water, to keep them warm while you make the rest.

To serve, spinkle each pancake with freshly squeezed lemon juice and caster sugar, fold in half, then in half again to form triangles, or else simply roll them up. Serve sprinkled with a little more sugar and lemon juice and extra sections of lemon.

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#9 Fri 11 Jan 08 11:35pm

Mr Grumpy

Forum champ
Occupation Sh*t Finder
From Coventry
Member since Sat 22 Dec 07

Re: Manicotti v Canneloni

That's about (rhymes with boat!) it for the batter recipe, Geoff, but I must rush to the defence of Canadians all over the world here and say that they HAVE TO be served with maple syrup!  OK, Aunt Jemima's if you still have a memory of a juvenile sweet tooth, but there's nothing like the real thing, eh?

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#10 Sat 12 Jan 08 2:59am

Maree

Forum super champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Manicotti v Canneloni

Thanks, people. Geoff, Delia's recipe is basically the same as the one I was brought up on. And *always* served with sugar and lemon juice.

Reminds me, Easter is early, this year- March. The hot cross buns and chocolate eggs were on the supermarket shelves on Boxing Day, here (sigh). Similar to the crass Christmas decorations going up in the shops in August. Anything to make money.

As for the maple syrup, I only buy Camp, a Canadian brand. If eating breakfast/brunch "out", I always ask for the maple syrup "on the side/ in a jug". I dont have a sweet tooth and find that a minute amount (1/2- 1 teaspoon) is more than enough for me. I also ask for no "whipped butter" (ewwww). Unless I do this, find the plate swimming in syrup.

Cannot "get" the idea of having pancakes (with syrup) served with bacon or Canadian ham. Prefer to keep the sweet stuff away from the savoury. Personal preference, thing.

Last edited by Maree-in-Sydney (Sat 12 Jan 08 3:18am)


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