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#1 Wed 18 Jun 08 4:56am

Asahi

Member
Occupation Aquaculture
From Australia
Member since Sat 10 Jul 04

Shrimp paste

Hi all,

I just bought some shrimp paste to make laksa and green curry pastes from.  This is the first time I have bought it.  I was wondering what else the shrimp paste can be used for, as I won't use it all.  I have searched the net and can't find too many alternate uses.  Any ideas??

Cheers

Asahi

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#2 Wed 18 Jun 08 8:03pm

Despina33

Forum champ
Occupation Housewife, Mom
From Montreal, Canada
Member since Sun 23 Mar 08

Re: Shrimp paste

you can always spread it omn some bread and make a sandwich.

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#3 Thu 19 Jun 08 2:45am

Asahi

Member
Occupation Aquaculture
From Australia
Member since Sat 10 Jul 04

Re: Shrimp paste

Cheers for the response, Despina.

However, I am not sure we are talking about the same shrimp paste.  The shrimp paste I am refering to is also called 'Belacan' (amongst a few other names), and is very punget.  It is used in asian cooking to add flavour to curry pastes.  On a sandwich I would think it would taste horrid - please correct me if I am mistaken though.

I have heard fish sauce may be a suitable substitute when it is unavailable.  But I am unsure, as I have not used it yet.

Asahi

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#4 Thu 19 Jun 08 3:04am

minerva

Forum champ
Occupation Walking the Old Ways
From Living in the Wild Woods
Member since Wed 16 Jan 08

Re: Shrimp paste

I use it in fish pie (ie potato topped, fish in sauce), chowders, fish stocks & indeed anything "meaty" that needs a salty tang & has a "gravy". The flavour isn't fishy, just meaty if you are fairly sparing with it & use it as you would any other seasoning.

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#5 Thu 19 Jun 08 3:12am

Asahi

Member
Occupation Aquaculture
From Australia
Member since Sat 10 Jul 04

Re: Shrimp paste

minerva - thanks!  That's the kind of things I thought it'd be ok to use the shrimp paste for.  I am making a laksa and green curry paste tomorrow, and then i'll try some (sparingly  wink ) in a stirfry..

thanks again

Asahi

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#6 Thu 19 Jun 08 7:27am

VENUS

Forum champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Shrimp paste

Nahm Prik Bplah Too

Ingredients
3 small mackerel, approximately 1 1/2 lb. total
1/4 to 1/2 tsp. fine sea salt
2 to 3 Tbs. dried shrimp
3 Tbs. good-quality shrimp paste (gkabpi)
Small piece of banana leaf or aluminum foil
10 cloves chopped garlic (about 2 generous Tbs.)
12-15 Thai chillies (prik kee noo), cut into thin rounds
Juice of 2 limes (about 4 to 5 Tbs.), to taste
3 1/2 to 4 tsp. granulated or palm sugar, to taste
Assorted vegetables
10 green or long beans
4 to 6 cups morning glory
1 medium-size bitter melon
4 to 5 round Thai eggplants
1 to 2 long Asian eggplant
12 small okra
2 tsp. sea salt
1 beaten egg with a pinch of salt added
1/4 to 1/2 cup oil, for pan-frying
1 to 2 Tbs. tapioca starch
Clean mackerel, rinse well, and drain. Rub evenly with a little salt, and let sit at least twenty minutes at room temperature before frying.

In a small, dry pan, roast dried shrimp over medium heat for several minutes, stirring frequently, until they have browned and become brittle and very fragrant. Cool a few minutes, then pound into a coarse powder with a mortar and wooden pestle. Transfer to a small sauce dish.

Wrap shrimp paste in a piece of banana leaf or aluminum foil and roast over the flames of a gas burner, holding the packet with a pair of tongs (or place directly on the heated coil of an electric burner). Turn frequently until leaf is charred and the aroma of shrimp paste is pronounced (5 or more minutes).

Cool a few minutes, then peel back charred leaf or foil.

Pound garlic and half the chillies in the mortar until pasty. Add roasted shrimp paste and powdered roasted dried shrimp and pound together to blend. Add lime juice, sugar, and remaining chillies, stir well, and adjust flavors to make a sauce that is intensely hot, salty, and sour, with a slight sweetness. (If it is not salty enough, add a little fish sauce; since most shrimp pastes are already highly salted, it usually is not necessary.) Set aside for the flavors to mingle and marry.

Prepare vegetables. Trim and cut long or green beans into 2-inch segments. Snap morning glory into shorter stem-with-leaf segments. Cut bitter melon in half lengthwise, scoop out the seeds, and slice crosswise into 1/4-inch pieces. Score round Thai eggplants deeply into quarters without cutting through. Slice the long eggplant at a sharp angle into 1/4-inch ovals. Leave okra whole.

Bring 1 1/2 quarts water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add 2 teaspoons sea salt. One vegetable at a time, blanch green or long beans, morning glory, bitter melon, and okra until they are vibrant green and lightly cooked. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain. Leave Thai eggplants raw. Dip oval eggplant pieces in beaten egg one piece at a time, and pan-fry in a small amount of oil in a flat skillet until browned on both sides and softened. Arrange vegetables in separate piles on a serving platter.

Heat oil in a wok or skillet over high heat until it begins to smoke. Swirl to coat wok surface. Pat mackerel dry all over, including the body cavity, and dust lightly with tapioca starch. Fry in the hot oil for 3 to 5 minutes on each side (depending on size of fish), or until they are browned and cooked through. Transfer to a serving plate.

Serve the lightly cooked and raw vegetables and pan-fried fish with the fermented shrimp dipping sauce and plenty of plain, steamed rice.

Stir-fried Yam Leaf (Sweet Potato Leaf) with Belacan (Shrimp Paste)

Ingredients:

1 box of yam leaf (approximately 0.8 lb)
1 tablespoon of belacan/shrimp paste
2 red bird's eye chilies or 1 regular red chili (remove seeds and thinly cut)
3 tablespoons cooking oil
3 cloves garlic (finely chopped)
1 tablespoon roasted chili paste
1 tablespoon dried shrimp
A few dashes fish sauce

Roasted Chili Paste

A handful of dried chilies
2 tablespoon of cooking oil
Water

Method:

Grind the dried chilies and cooking oil in a blender. Add a little water while blending. Heat the wok, pour some cooking oil and stir-fry the chili paste for about 3 minutes. Set aside. Soak the dried shrimp in warm water for 10 minutes, then coarsely pound them using mortar and pestle. Set aside.

Cut the stems of the yam leaf. Keep only the tender part of the stems. Rinse with cold water and then set aside. Fire up the wok to HIGH heat and add the cooking oil. Wait till smoke comes out from the wok then add in the chopped garlic. Do a quick stir, add in the belacan, dried shrimp, and roasted chili paste and continue stirring. As soon as you smell the pungent aroma of belacan, toss in the yam leaf. Stir continuously until the leaves started to wilt. Add in a few dashes of fish sauce, continue stirring (make sure the color of the vegetable remains green). Dish up and serve hot

Shrimp Paste Rice

2 1/2 cups cooked jasmine rice
1 teaspoon shrimp paste
1/2 tablespoon fish sauce
some vegetable oil
1/4 cup dried shrimp
1 egg
1/3 cup shredded green mango
1 cup pork, shoulder cut w/fat
2 teaspoons fish sauce
1 teaspoon sweet soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon white pepper powder
1 tablespoon palm sugar
1 teaspoon sliced small thai chilies
1 tablespoon sliced shallots
1/4 - 1/2 lime
1 teaspoon coriander

Directions
The first step is to make the sweet pork. Slice the pork thin (1 1/2″ x 1″ x 1/3″) (4cm x 2.5cm x 1cm). Fry it in about 1 teaspoon of oil on high heat. Add the fish sauce, soy sauce, pepper, and palm sugar. Cook until itís no longer raw. Lower the heat to medium low. Keep adding a little water every now and then to keep it from getting to dry and burning. Cook for about 10 minutes until shiny and sticky. Set aside.
The next step is to make the egg strips. Crack one egg in a bowl and whisk until mixed. Wet a tissue with oil and wipe the inside of the pan. You donít want a lot of oil for this one. A non-stick pan comes in handy for this kind of thing. Pour the egg in and tilt the pan so the egg evenly coats the bottom of the pan, about 1/8″ (.25cm) deep. Fry on medium heat until set and golden (not brown). Flip once. Take off heat and allow to cool. Roll the egg and slice thin to create strips. Set aside.
Fry the shrimp in oil until crispy, about 30 seconds on medium-high. Strain and set aside.
Slice your chilies & shallots thin. Peel the mangoís skin and chop with a knife to make thin strips (or use a cheese grater).
Add a little oil (about a teaspoon) into your pan and turn the heat up to medium-high. When the pan is hot, add the rice, shrimp paste and fish sauce. Stir well to mix. Cook until the rice is warmed up and mixed well.
This dish is usually served by packing the rice into a bowl, and using it as a mold. Turn it upside-down onto a plate and remove. Then add all the other things around the rice on the plate, with the egg on top of the rice. Garnish with cilantro.
When you eat it, mix it all together and squeeze the fresh lime juice on top.

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#7 Fri 20 Jun 08 12:41am

Asahi

Member
Occupation Aquaculture
From Australia
Member since Sat 10 Jul 04

Re: Shrimp paste

Cheers Venus.  You've given me a few more ideas to play around with.

I'm using the belacan today - I'm keen to try the sweet potato leaf and belacan recipe you gave - sounds interesting - my neighbour gorws sweet potato so I'll have to get a few leaves off her..

Thanks again

Asahi

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#8 Fri 20 Jun 08 8:37am

VENUS

Forum champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Shrimp paste

Not a problem smile

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#9 Mon 14 Jun 10 6:12pm

Ade100

Member
Occupation IT Management
From French Riviera
Member since Mon 14 Jun 10

Re: Shrimp paste

Belachan is at the heart of Malay and Nonja cooking. Check out the millions of Sambal recipes, Lontong, Mee Rebus, Nasi Lemak, etc. (I am probably not allowed to paste links here but you can google these things)

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