Jamie Oliver

forum: Food & Drink

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#131 Fri 07 May 10 9:42pm

foodieinUSA

Member
From Rolling hills of Ohio, USA
Member since Tue 23 Mar 10

Re: Medieval cooking

Jamie, I am so happy to have discovered your website!
I was fascinated by the "Medieval Foods", happy to have discovered this blog.

Loverlygrub the story of your 14th century home was amazing!
Some day I would love to see it.  What has happened to your tithe barn home?  Thank you for sharing your story.

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#132 Fri 07 May 10 10:49pm

frizz1974

Forum super champ
Occupation Mother of 2 working more than full time
From Wallerawang, Oz
Member since Wed 29 Jun 05

Re: Medieval cooking

Hi Foodie - nice to see this old thread again...

Welcome to the forums...

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#133 Fri 07 May 10 10:52pm

foodieinUSA

Member
From Rolling hills of Ohio, USA
Member since Tue 23 Mar 10

Re: Medieval cooking

Thank you frizz, I'm lovin it!

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#134 Fri 07 May 10 11:31pm

frizz1974

Forum super champ
Occupation Mother of 2 working more than full time
From Wallerawang, Oz
Member since Wed 29 Jun 05

Re: Medieval cooking

I was sooo addicted to these forums when I first joined... logged in several times a day to chat & see the responses to comment but now I can go whole days without logging ..  lol  lol  lol

Doesnt happen often though  wink

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#135 Fri 07 May 10 11:55pm

foodieinUSA

Member
From Rolling hills of Ohio, USA
Member since Tue 23 Mar 10

Re: Medieval cooking

I can see how someone could get addicted to these forums.

I am learning some good things here. 
Enjoying the different cultures.

Your son is sooooooooooo cute frizz!

Last edited by foodieinUSA (Fri 07 May 10 11:55pm)

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#136 Fri 07 May 10 11:59pm

Ashen

Forum champ
Occupation Why is the Rum always gone???!
From out to lunch
Member since Sat 07 Jan 06

Re: Medieval cooking

frizz1974 wrote:

I was sooo addicted to these forums when I first joined... logged in several times a day to chat & see the responses to comment but now I can go whole days without logging ..  lol  lol  lol

Doesnt happen often though  wink

I noticed you didn't specify whether it was whole days without logging in or logging out.  tongue  whistle


Only a fool argues with a skunk, a mule or a cook.  { cowboy saying}
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#137 Sat 08 May 10 12:06am

foodieinUSA

Member
From Rolling hills of Ohio, USA
Member since Tue 23 Mar 10

Re: Medieval cooking

Ashen, what in the devil do you mean wink

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#138 Sat 08 May 10 6:59am

TerryKay

Forum champ
Occupation Beer Reviewer, Freelance Writer and Pole Dancer at Peppermint Hippo.
From London
Member since Sun 06 Dec 09

Re: Medieval cooking

clap

Jamie wrote:

Hi guys,

I am getting right into Medieval cooking at the moment and by this I mean cooking with logs, charcoal, cauldrons, smoking, slow cooking, and cooking desserts in tins with hot ash over the top so that it cooks like an oven. I would love to hear from you if you have experience of this or of you have any views on Medieval cooking. Do you use any of these cooking techniques at home?

Love Jamie O xxx

Hi guy, wink

Here's a very very old cookbook.
Called 'The Forme of Cury'
Dated 1390

It's fascinating.
This website has many ancient cookbooks. All public domain I believe.
Hope this helps.
Love Terry Kay xxx
big_smile

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/8102

Last edited by TerryKay (Sat 08 May 10 7:04am)


Brews views, beer reviews, and booze news. Choose YouTube's Beer Goggles Reviews
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#139 Sat 08 May 10 1:51pm

Anna

Forum champ
From Switzerland
Member since Fri 15 Apr 05

Re: Medieval cooking

If it's still available on iPlayer, Clarissa Dixon-Wright did a one-off show cooking from the Forme of Cury a few months ago.

PS:  The revival of this thread has reminded me I promised to do a proper post on medieval food - I will get round to it eventually.   oops

Last edited by Anna (Sat 08 May 10 1:52pm)

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#140 Sat 08 May 10 2:33pm

TSR

Member
From Serbia
Member since Sun 04 Apr 10

Re: Medieval cooking

Here's an old one:

KAVURMA
Brought to the Balkans by the conquering Ottomans, Kavurma is essentially a sort of stew made of various bits offal. It's a very old dish, but still made today in rural areas and even though it sounds a bit gross it's a gourmet's dream!   If you are grossed out, don't be - at this point these ingredients are as fresh as can be and the aromas are quite mild. Today, the dish is made after young animals (pigs & lamb) are slaughtered for tomorrow's roast, so the offal is quite delicate. When an animal is butchered, various bits such as the heart, tongue, stomach, small intestine, lungs, kidneys, liver, sweetbreads etc. are put aside and lard is rendered in a cauldron over an open fire (even today). Some of the bits such as the tripe and intestines are washed, boiled once, the water thrown out and washed again, but the others are sliced into bite-sized chunks. Onions, garlic and various herbs (remember, back then few could afford even pepper, but herbs are weeds and grow everywhere) are stewed along with the offal, slowly with frequent stirring. Paprika is a must today, but didn't exist back then. After hours the stew would be served with bread. The rest of it would be placed in an earthenware dish(es) and covered with a layer of molten fat. This forms a wax-like seal, and the cold kavurma can actually last a while in the cellar and eaten cold. If you are lucky enough to get your hands on 100% fresh and young offal, kavurma served with rye bread is brilliant!  dribble

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