forum: Gardening / Growing

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#51 Tue 05 Aug 08 4:31pm

madamada

Forum super champ
Occupation living life
From Friuli northern Italy
Member since Mon 14 Jan 08

Re: Vegetables and fruits that we have forgotten about....

there is an herb which grows inthe fields which tastes of vinegar, and farmers ate it when they were faraway from home harvesting frumento or erba medica in summer, it was an antidoto to thirst, one other vinegar tasting herb grew in the holes of pebbles walls around my nonna's house. We ate that and after chewing we spit it it was our dissetante while playing  hide and seek, I still remember the taste. mmmmmmmmmm
Chewing gum wa made with grains of "frumento", we took the spighe, crushed them in the hand and then blew away the ****, the grains chewed after a while became our "gome merecane", we were very proud of our self-sufficiency big_smile

it's not medioevo but almost

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#52 Fri 08 Aug 08 4:54pm

marciacrg

Member
Occupation Jornalism
From Brasília - Brazil
Member since Wed 25 Jun 08

Re: Vegetables and fruits that we have forgotten about....

Oh dear Jamie...
Good rest..........I'll miss you but everyone needs take a break.
I doing gastronomia college.
It is so cool...........i am love about food. Tanks for you my great brother.

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#53 Sat 09 Aug 08 9:49pm

lemur

Member
Member since Sat 09 Aug 08

Re: Vegetables and fruits that we have forgotten about....

I've only had cardoons once, and they were delicious!  Not sure how they'll take to CO (just bought land there and will be starting a small farm and huge garden) but I'm hoping they'll grow there. 

My grandma came over from Poland after WW2 and she was big on teaching me to gather and use wild herbs.  One of my favorites is Lamb's Quarters, which (steamed) tastes like spinach only more iron-intense. 

We also ate a huge amount of sorrel, both sheep sorrel (which is spear shaped) and the regular clover-like variety.  Fresh, it's wonderfully lemony in flavor.  I recently bought a bottle of pureed sorrel at an ethnic deli and was quite disappointed that it didn't taste anything like the fresh.

Our house was also landscaped with numerous hosta plants, which most folks think are just decorative, but they have a delicious almost nut-like or toasted flavor as greens in salad. 

To the person who inquired about purslane, I've only used it raw in salads.  Very yummy.  I understand it can also be steamed like spinach or used to thicken soups and stews. 

As for berries - oh please yes!  Give me gooseberries and currants.  They were so delicious that me and my brother and sister would usually eat them off the vine (often before they were even ripe) before they could make it to the kitchen.  Gooseberry preserves are devastating paired with chicken or other fowl.  Unripe they have an amazing tart lemony flavor.  Fully ripened they're sweet and delicate with just a hint of tart.

Crabapples too - again, these generally never got to the table, though they make wonderful preserves.  Usually we'd sit in the tree and eat them half-ripe, and the birds would get the rest.

Nobody's mentioned Seckel pears yet.  Unripe they're very bitter (we ate them that way anyway) but they ripen to amazing sweetness.

LOL does it sound like we roamed around eating pretty much every plant that we could get our hands on?  That would be absolutely correct.  I even remember eating forsythia flowers (which I've read are poisonous - but I'm not dead yet).  I was lucky to be raised on a piece of land that had been sculpted as a kitchen garden about 200 years ago, thought it got somewhat out of hand over the years.  Fortunately I had kid-instincts and "knew" what was edible and what wasn't.

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#54 Sun 10 Aug 08 3:57pm

minerva

Forum champ
Occupation Walking the Old Ways
From Living in the Wild Woods
Member since Wed 16 Jan 08

Re: Vegetables and fruits that we have forgotten about....

Sorry MsP only just found your enquiry as to the winter-hardiness of Cardoons.

I was always told to cover the crowns with bracken or straw as a mulch to get them through the worst of the winter, but haven't done so for years. I always collect seed, so if disaster came to town I can always start again. Here in the East Midlands, we are a fairly temperate folk, though with prolonged wet & some fairly fierce wind-chill it can get rather cold. Mostly though the younger the crown, the more resiliant it seems to be, & lower minus figures don't seem to make much difference.

Hope that helps some. Just have a go, its not the end of the world if you have to grow them every year. They make plenty of seed.


Note: reading through some of the posts, I realise how far younger "sophisticated" people have moved away from how I was taught to (still do) cook. Crabapples, Hawthorn leaves & berries (not just Monogyna, but also Laevigata!), Sweet Chestnut, Birch Sap, Sloes/Damsons/Plums/Gages, a whole host of wild herbs & "greens", Medlars, Quinces, Hops....................& masses more are "ordinary" fare to me! They are used as they come into season & the year is often judged by the quality of their harvest. It saddens me that so much food is "bought" & so much is wasted because it is "easy come, easy go". Until people see native foods as important as imported ones, they are missing so much of their history & culture as well as the pleasure of eating. I know I'm an old whisht, but its just my few penn'orth.  smile

Last edited by minerva (Sun 10 Aug 08 4:21pm)

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#55 Wed 13 Aug 08 3:03am

auzzi_teen_cook

Member
Occupation Music player, Wedding video guy and takeaway pasta guy
From Valley - Gold Coast Australia
Member since Sun 10 Aug 08

Re: Vegetables and fruits that we have forgotten about....

What about Tamerillo's 
they are an extremely tasty fruit and i just love the taste of them here is australia

I hardly ever seen people use them or even grow or SELL them.

LOTS of people don't even know what they are.

THE SPELL CHECK doesn't even recognize it as a word.

either that or i carn't spell it.

TEEN COOK FROM AUSTRALIA  big_smile

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#56 Sat 16 Aug 08 1:14am

Tooheavynow

Member

Re: Vegetables and fruits that we have forgotten about....

Just revamping our veggie beds like Jamie's. Any tips on how to get tons of top soil without importing more weeds?
help

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#57 Sat 16 Aug 08 10:35am

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Vegetables and fruits that we have forgotten about....

auzzi_teen_cook you probably mean Tomatillo

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomatillo

Available widely in the UK in supermarkets, where we knw it as Physalis

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#58 Sat 16 Aug 08 4:03pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Vegetables and fruits that we have forgotten about....

So, you don't use the term 'tomatillo' in the UK?  I found this interesting that it is a Physalis and what I think of as Physalis is a small orange fruit from the Solanaceae family.  Just goes to show how misleading common names can be.

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#59 Sat 16 Aug 08 5:39pm

zozinutza

Member
Occupation medical practitioner
From Brisbane, Australia
Member since Sat 16 Aug 08

Re: Vegetables and fruits that we have forgotten about....

Hi to all!
I am brand new here and I live now in Australia but my home country is Romania.
My grandma used a lot of less known plants and vegies in her dishes.
I still miss here in Australia the taste of the parsley root in a chicken soup together with carrots, parsnip, celeriac, home made thin noodles and fresh chopped parsley on top. Yummmmmmmmm!!!!\
What about a nettle sour soup with sharp (sour) dock??? And if you add some lovage to any sour soup it gives it a heavenly taste.
But the dish I long for is my grandma's pie with notch (pig's weed) and a romanian sort of salted cheese made by farmers and dill. My mum still has notch in her garden and still makes this delicious pie.
Someone ever tasted wild strawberries??? Their aroma is so strong and even the taste is different than normal strawberries. About 20 years ago we went on a hill next to a wood and we picked a bunch of wild strawberry plants with roots and planted them in our garden. They spread like a weed, we have to work every year to keep them in their place but useless to say they are my boy's favourite fruits. He just runs in the garden and eats them on the spot.
The thing that upsets me most here, in Australia, is that I can't find to buy at the markets the good old horseradish roots. I know, I can find all kind of jars filled with creams of horseradish but their strong taste is gone. I like the raw horseradish: just peel it (be sure you wear a mask when you do this), grate it, add 1 teaspoon of sugar and white vinegar. The taste is so strong that tears come out of your eyes and you feel your palate is going to explode. Perfect cure for blocked nose or sinusitis.
And a tip: try a jam made of green walnuts or green tomatoes....I have no words to describe them.
That's it for now.
Hope to hear more interesting things from you all! yummy

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#60 Sat 16 Aug 08 5:48pm

zozinutza

Member
Occupation medical practitioner
From Brisbane, Australia
Member since Sat 16 Aug 08

Re: Vegetables and fruits that we have forgotten about....

Ohhhhh! I forgot our apricot jam with halves of the fruits inside and apricot kernels inside (they taste very much like almonds). Exquisit!!!! kiss

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