forum: Food & Drink

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#1 Wed 17 Sep 08 5:22am

bmsma

Member
Occupation Mum of 2 little angels
From New Zealand
Member since Sat 13 Sep 08

Squash vs pumpkin

Hi everyone, this might be a silly question but what's the difference between squash and pumpkin???? I'm in New Zealand and never see squash in supermarkets, only pumpkin. I've seen heaps of recipes using squash, is pumpkin fine to use? Does it cook differently or taste different?

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#2 Wed 17 Sep 08 7:18am

shammrok

Forum super champ
Occupation Growing things
From Up the garden path...Tasmania
Member since Thu 02 Sep 04

Re: Squash vs pumpkin

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#3 Wed 17 Sep 08 7:48am

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Squash vs pumpkin

In German we have only one word for both.
Basically squash is smaller than pumpkin though there are lots of different varieties of both. I often use squash in recipes calling for pumpkin, because we are a small household.
Supermarkets here usually sell pumpkin around halloween (one of those imported holidays...) and the rest of the time only hokkaido squash. They cater to the masses. You could go and look for other sources for squash.
The Asian grocer here also has butternut almost year round and sometimes those green ones with orange flesh. A good source for different varieties of pumpkin (or squash) are markets, farmers markets, and in part green grocers.

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#4 Wed 17 Sep 08 9:18am

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Squash vs pumpkin

Pumpkins, and all other similar vegetables (like butternut squah/pumpkin), are called pumpkins in australia. Squash we usually reserve for the small flattish patty pan vegetable that is like a deformed yellow zucchini.

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#5 Wed 17 Sep 08 9:22am

shammrok

Forum super champ
Occupation Growing things
From Up the garden path...Tasmania
Member since Thu 02 Sep 04

Re: Squash vs pumpkin

The White Rabbit wrote:

Pumpkins, and all other similar vegetables (like butternut squah/pumpkin), are called pumpkins in australia. Squash we usually reserve for the small flattish patty pan vegetable that is like a deformed yellow zucchini.

The little flattish ones, Jamie calls patty pans, which is what we call patty cake holders.

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#6 Wed 17 Sep 08 10:27am

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Squash vs pumpkin

bmsma, Americans use the term squash for the whole family - for the hard winter varieites and the soft summer varieties.  We use pumpkin for the big orange hard winter squash that is used for jack-o-lanterns and pumpkin pie.  When talking about other varieties, we refer to them specifically - acorn squash, zucchini, patty pan, Kuri, butternut, etc.  Also, generally the bright orange jack-o-lantern pumpkins are watery and the flesh is not very dense, so most people would use a  similar varieity that is smaller, sweeter, denser, with a darker, slightly orange color, same shape, for pumpkin pies or for American recipes calling for pumpkin.  Since the canned version of this type of pumpkin is excellent, it's often used rather than starting with the fresh pumpkin for baking.

Clear as a fish in muddy water? big_smile

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#7 Thu 18 Sep 08 12:17am

bmsma

Member
Occupation Mum of 2 little angels
From New Zealand
Member since Sat 13 Sep 08

Re: Squash vs pumpkin

Thanks everyone for your responses, sorry for sounding like a dumbass!

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#8 Fri 19 Sep 08 12:29pm

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Squash vs pumpkin

That's ok, sometimes you just don't hear the foreign terms for foods.

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#9 Fri 19 Sep 08 12:45pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Squash vs pumpkin

Gee, really, I've had to ask so many questions on this forum about terms or ingredients we don't normally use in the U.S.  I tend to write as an American so I don't further confuse, if I say cilantro, you know it means the leaves of the corriander, etc.  If I start using The Queen's English, it might confuse people, they would think I meant American biscuits rather than cookies if not in the right context.  Am I making sense?  I hope!

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#10 Fri 19 Sep 08 4:57pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Squash vs pumpkin

Being neither American nor British nor native to any other variety of English I mix - and so do many others. It can get really confusing. So just ask any time you are uncertain!!!!! wink

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