Jamie Oliver

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#1 Thu 18 Dec 08 1:01pm

john_lee

Member
Occupation Teacher and Writer
From Wales and Italy
Member since Mon 10 Oct 05

Christmas Goose - Five Spice or No Spice

Hello all,

I have come over all Dickensian this year, and have ordered a 12 pound goose for the Christmas feast. I plan to roast it with two stuffings: a potato and apple, and a forcemeat. I have also made some spiced pickled pears as an accompaniment (this is all taken from St. Delia's Christmas book, if anyone is interested).

My question is thus: I have seen both Jamie and Gordon extolling the use of Chinese Five Spice powder on the skin of duck and goose (J. used it in the At Home Christmas Special), but as much as I like Cantonese-style roast duck, I'm not sure that it's what I want for Christmas dinner. However, Five Spice does seem to contain some very Christmassy spices, such as cloves and cinnamon.

If I go down the spice road, would it conflice with the aforementioned stuffings, etc.?

I am confused. Please help!

PS. Having only ever cooked turkey for Crimbo, would 'pigs in blankets' go as well with goose, or should I not bother... I don't want to over-egg the pudding!

Last edited by john_lee (Thu 18 Dec 08 1:04pm)

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#2 Thu 18 Dec 08 2:20pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Christmas Goose - Five Spice or No Spice

5-spice blend is very Christmassy if you don't add other typical Chinese flavors and would go very well with your apples, pears etc as well. If you like Christmassy spices it is a good way to go.

The typical German thing to add to a goose is a sprig of mugwood though I have never cooked goose and have no idea what the mugwood tastes like. I suppose the theory is that it is good for a stomach filled with lots of fat food.... Typical German sides are red cabbage (with apples), potatoes or potato dumplings, baked apples. If the goose is stuffed then often with apples and onions (very good! - especially if cloves, possibly cinnamon or bay leaves are used. My ex-aunt used to make a wonderful goose.

I couldn't picture pigs in blankets to either turkey or goose really. Keep in mind that goose is fattier and more flavorful than turkey and so you may not want to add many fatty sides, but rather get a collection of interesting flavors. I think your fruity sides are really good, just as well something pickled. The acidity gives a lovely counter point. If you can get a scrumptious vegetable side or an interesting salad that would be good too. Or really do the baked apples. With custard they are a nice dessert, but I was served baked apple halves as a side to goose and it was fantastic.
Personally I would serve the potatoes as a side and not the stuffing, and rather add onions to the stuffing, but that is just me. Unfortunately the aunt is now my EX-aunt and I no longer have access to the recipe, or I would have been happy to get it for you.

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#3 Thu 18 Dec 08 2:56pm

john_lee

Member
Occupation Teacher and Writer
From Wales and Italy
Member since Mon 10 Oct 05

Re: Christmas Goose - Five Spice or No Spice

Hi Suzanna,

Thanks very much for your tips - the German ideas are very interesting, and the more I learn about a German Christmas, the more I realise that our British Christmas food is very close to our Dutch and German cousins.

After reading your post, I think I will try dusting the goose with five spice powder, and I will leave the pigs in blankets for this year as the goose will be fatty enough

I think my main course will be as follows:

Five spice roasted goose with two stuffings (forcemeat, and apple and potato)
Goose fat roasted potatoes and parsnips
Braised red cabbage with apples
Sprouts with pancetta and chestnuts
Bashed swede and carrots
Home-made spiced pickled pears

Has anyone got any advice. Do you think that menu will balance well? I'd love to hear suggestions.

Thanks,

John

Last edited by john_lee (Thu 18 Dec 08 3:03pm)

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#4 Thu 18 Dec 08 2:56pm

GeoffP

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Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Christmas Goose - Five Spice or No Spice

I'd go with the five-spice rub - I did last year and it was simply delicious.

Stuff the neck end of the goose with the forcemeat stuffing, but only put a little stuffing in the breast cavity - you need the air to circulate.

I did Jamie's recipe last Christmas while in France, but this year I'm thinking about doing Hugh Fearnley Whittingstalls Turkey three ways:-

http://www.rivercottage.net/SeasonalRec … Goose.aspx

Last edited by GeoffP (Thu 18 Dec 08 3:08pm)

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#5 Thu 18 Dec 08 3:00pm

john_lee

Member
Occupation Teacher and Writer
From Wales and Italy
Member since Mon 10 Oct 05

Re: Christmas Goose - Five Spice or No Spice

Thanks Geoff, if it's good enough for you then it's good enough for me. Do you think my above mentioned menu sounds OK? I am still tweaking and open to suggestions. I am going to Google H.F.W.'s turkey now - did you see River Cottage Christmas last night? It was good. On 4OD now.

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#6 Thu 18 Dec 08 3:22pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Christmas Goose - Five Spice or No Spice

Your menu sounds fine very like what I'll be serving - I assume real gravy from the roasting pan?

Haven't got round to watching HFW's River Cottage Christmas, but I have it recorded, and will watch tonight.

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#7 Thu 18 Dec 08 3:24pm

john_lee

Member
Occupation Teacher and Writer
From Wales and Italy
Member since Mon 10 Oct 05

Re: Christmas Goose - Five Spice or No Spice

Absolutely, Geoff, I always use the Jamie veg and herb trivet now, and it's transformed my gravy into a thing of beauty! Would you use red wine or white in a goose gravy, or even cider?

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#8 Thu 18 Dec 08 3:59pm

hugchoco

Member
Member since Wed 22 Oct 08

Re: Christmas Goose - Five Spice or No Spice

Hi John, your menu is making me hungry. they seem compatible with each other.   yummy

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#9 Thu 18 Dec 08 6:00pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Christmas Goose - Five Spice or No Spice

The wine in the roasting pan isn't too important, but I would always add a very good slug of Port when making the gravy.

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#10 Thu 18 Dec 08 9:31pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Christmas Goose - Five Spice or No Spice

Geoff, if I didn't know better I'd say you must be related with my gran and me: always a nice slug of something in anything yummy
(Personally think that a little alcohol "breaks" the flavors, especially fat and sugar nicely. Plus a good wine, port,..... always adds a richness and flavor you would not get otherwise.)

John, British and German cooking have a lot in common and yet can be very distinct. They are both very hearty northern cusines with lots of potatoes, dairy, smoked, cured and pickled things,...
Yet, they are both regional and "grown". British food uses a lot of fish, where German cuisine has lots of sea fish in the north, sweetwater fish in most of the country, but hardly any fish at all in some of the more mountainous (riverless) parts. We are not so fond of pies as you (I personally am, but whistle ), and you can tell we had not colonies worth speaking of (very late and very few that is), to give us cheaper access to spices. Curry - a British staple nowadays - is an obscure meal here. We are much more influenced by our direct neighbors: Austria in the south (great desserts), France to the west (most highbrow cuisine), Polish to the east (hearty workman's food), just to name a few. History brought Soviet (at that time) cuisine to eastern Germany, and Italian, Turkish, Yugoslavian, Greek..... to western Germany (through the guest workers).
Dutch and German food is similar near the border, and Sabs and I have often noticed Rhineland German and Flemish are very similar too. They probably have more in common than the Rhinelander and a Bavarian. Dutch cuisine and British cuisine share the colonial history  of course.

wink

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