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#1 Fri 13 Mar 09 2:56pm

Silvertree6

Member
Member since Fri 13 Mar 09

Roasting 2 small joints instead of 1 large Joint

I have bought 2 joints of ribeye to roast, one weights 1.1kilo and the other 1.3kilo this was because i could not get a large joint.Do i cook the meat as if it was one joint weighing 2.4kg ? I was going to cook it as in the ministry of food whack it in a preheated HOT oven then turn heat down to gas mark 6 and cook for 20mins per 500g?? any thoughts would be much appreciated

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#2 Fri 13 Mar 09 3:03pm

MsPablo

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Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Roasting 2 small joints instead of 1 large Joint

You would leave some space around them in the roasting tray if at all possible so the heat circulates evenly and they brown.  Calculate cooking time according to the weight of one, not both.  Rotating them once or twice during the process may help if they're close together so all sides get equal heat.  A meat thermoter is a good idea.

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#3 Fri 13 Mar 09 3:22pm

Silvertree6

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Member since Fri 13 Mar 09

Re: Roasting 2 small joints instead of 1 large Joint

Thanks Mspablo, I very nearly eanded up with cremated beef there!! Thank you

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#4 Fri 13 Mar 09 4:36pm

TheBeast2

Forum champ
Member since Fri 31 Aug 07

Re: Roasting 2 small joints instead of 1 large Joint

Silvertree6 wrote:

I have bought 2 joints of ribeye to roast, one weights 1.1kilo and the other 1.3kilo this was because i could not get a large joint.Do i cook the meat as if it was one joint weighing 2.4kg ? I was going to cook it as in the ministry of food whack it in a preheated HOT oven then turn heat down to gas mark 6 and cook for 20mins per 500g?? any thoughts would be much appreciated

You want to cook according to the size of the meat, not the weight.

Think about it. If each piece weighs 2kg, and you tape them both together, then you will have a piece of meat that is double the thickness of each individual piece. The weight, however, will still be the same. It will, regardless, take longer for the taped pieces to cook through to the centre, since there'll be more solid matter for the heat to have to penetrate through.

Also consider, that a similar result would occur if you sliced each piece into fine strips and cooked them in a wide roasting tray.

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#5 Fri 13 Mar 09 4:47pm

MsPablo

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Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Roasting 2 small joints instead of 1 large Joint

That's accurate Beast2, but how does the home cook guage the cooking time for a fairly big roast?  I thought it was usually 'type of roast' and weight, that kind of suggests the shape or how big around it is, no?  I suggested the weight of one because they aren't linking the two together with string.

Last edited by MsPablo (Fri 13 Mar 09 4:49pm)

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#6 Fri 13 Mar 09 7:08pm

Silvertree6

Member
Member since Fri 13 Mar 09

Re: Roasting 2 small joints instead of 1 large Joint

Thank you both for your advice! i think I got a beeter understanding of the thought behind it now! I'll be putting it into practice tomorrow!

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#7 Fri 13 Mar 09 7:45pm

TheBeast2

Forum champ
Member since Fri 31 Aug 07

Re: Roasting 2 small joints instead of 1 large Joint

MsPablo wrote:

That's accurate Beast2, but how does the home cook guage the cooking time for a fairly big roast?  I thought it was usually 'type of roast' and weight, that kind of suggests the shape or how big around it is, no?  I suggested the weight of one because they aren't linking the two together with string.

Well, the thing is, cooking time can never be accurately gauged, since factors ranging from actual oven temperature to heat of the kitchen to time meat is left out of the fridge to where in the oven the meat is to the type of vessel it is cooked in to how many times the oven is opened (and how long for) all affect cooking time.

It is just something that must be chalked up to experience.

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#8 Fri 13 Mar 09 8:35pm

amiel

Member
From the woods
Member since Mon 22 Nov 04

Re: Roasting 2 small joints instead of 1 large Joint

Definitely, if your oven has enough power you should estimate the time as for a single one (one of your small pieces). Just leave some space between them, so that each of them can be cooked as if it were alone in the oven.
Cheers,
amiel crossed

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#9 Fri 13 Mar 09 8:45pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Roasting 2 small joints instead of 1 large Joint

TheBeast2 wrote:

MsPablo wrote:

That's accurate Beast2, but how does the home cook guage the cooking time for a fairly big roast?  I thought it was usually 'type of roast' and weight, that kind of suggests the shape or how big around it is, no?  I suggested the weight of one because they aren't linking the two together with string.

Well, the thing is, cooking time can never be accurately gauged, since factors ranging from actual oven temperature to heat of the kitchen to time meat is left out of the fridge to where in the oven the meat is to the type of vessel it is cooked in to how many times the oven is opened (and how long for) all affect cooking time.

It is just something that must be chalked up to experience.

I agree, found using a thermometer is helpful and to be familiar with your oven.  My oven has many challenging problems, so I've avoiding cooking expensive roasts, but once in a while I put a bird in there.

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#10 Tue 17 Mar 09 4:29pm

Silvertree6

Member
Member since Fri 13 Mar 09

Re: Roasting 2 small joints instead of 1 large Joint

Bought a Meet Thermometer! lucky I did coz it took almost double the time i anticipated! Must not have a very hot oven! using the thermometer meat come out perfect though so good result!!! thanks for all the advise

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