forum: Gardening / Growing

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#1 Sat 19 Sep 09 10:51pm

shokkyy

Member
Member since Sat 15 Nov 08

Drying bay leaves?

Is it best to dry them in an airing cupboard or air dry them, or doesn't it matter?

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#2 Sat 19 Sep 09 11:29pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Drying bay leaves?

I am not sure that I would put them in an airing cupboard,I know that when I was a child , we used to just hang a bunch of Bay leaves up in a cool dry room and leave them to dry.

I have not dried bayleaves since then as I just still use them all be it a bit sparingly , from the plant during the winter. I have never had a problem.

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#3 Sun 20 Sep 09 12:08am

shokkyy

Member
Member since Sat 15 Nov 08

Re: Drying bay leaves?

I did read somewhere that if you use fresh bay leaves they're not as potent as dried. Is that not true?

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#4 Sun 20 Sep 09 12:48am

Kye

Forum super champ
Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: Drying bay leaves?

Tied upside down, outside when dry, or in the kithen, they will last for week's, and have a look at what they say on @:

Bay Leaf
(Laurus nobilis) The dried aromatic leaf of the laurel or bay tree, used as a seasoning in cooking. The laurel or bay tree dates back to Greek mythology where the beautiful Daphne is turned into a bay tree to spare her from continually being pursued by Apollo. Greeks and Romans were rewarded for athletic feats and battles with a crown of bay leaves, a symbol that is still recognized today. Although the berries of the bay tree are poisonous and clearly not used for cooking, the bay leaf is used in cooking, but only in its dried form - the fresh leaf has a very bitter taste. Bay leaves are primarily used in slow-cooking recipes, particularly for soups and stews, casseroles, terrines (dish cooked in an earthenware container), pates, and roasts. Bay leaves should be used sparingly, as the leaves are quite potent. Dried bay leaves are found in stores around the world and are mainly produced in Turkey in several grades. Low grades come in bales and come with extraneous matter, and are not advisable. Higher grade bay leaf is cleaner and more uniform in size and color. Fresh bay leaves are dark green and shiny on the top, and when they are dried they turn to a lighter green and have a matt finish on both sides. Do not purchase yellow leaves, as these have been exposed to excess light and have lost potency. When properly stored, bay leaves should last for up to three years. Powdered bay leaves should only be purchased in small quantities, because, while convenient, they lose flavor within a year of grinding, even when properly stored.
Tastes good in: Bouquet Garni, soups, meat and poultry dishes
Try: throwing a bayleaf in the water when cooking potatoes for mashed potatoes. yummy

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#5 Sun 20 Sep 09 1:17am

JoyYamDaisy

Forum super champ
From Melbourne Australia
Member since Sun 12 Apr 09

Re: Drying bay leaves?

Some people say Bay is one herb where the dried is best, but I (with my wonderful palate  wink ) can't tell the difference. You can consider freezing the fresh leaves.
I don't see anything wrong with using the airing cupboard, just don't keep them there too long.
I just let mine dry in a basket in the kitchen smile

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#6 Mon 21 Sep 09 1:37pm

leeza09

Member
Member since Thu 10 Sep 09

Re: Drying bay leaves?

dry the leaves separately on a drying deck i mean there should be an airflow between each leaf. In areas of high humidity, it will work better than air drying whole stems. Remove the best leaves from the stems. Lay the leaves on a paper towel, without allowing leaves to touch. Cover with another towel and layer of leaves. Five layers may be dried at one time using this method. Dry in a very cool oven. The oven light of an electric range or the pilot light of a gas range furnishes enough heat for overnight drying. Leaves dry flat and retain a good color.

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#7 Mon 21 Sep 09 6:10pm

mr spice

Forum champ
Occupation Working dad...
From Germany
Member since Sat 05 Sep 09

Re: Drying bay leaves?

We cut stems and keep them in a cotton bag hanging in the kitchen. This is just to keep dust off them. Dried, they do seem slightly more potent, but I've frequently used them straight off the tree also...

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#8 Mon 21 Sep 09 6:15pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Drying bay leaves?

Joy , the only reason that I would not use an airing cupboard is that I feel that the leaves would dry too quickly.

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#9 Mon 21 Sep 09 9:33pm

Johanna_t

Member
From the city on three borders
Member since Wed 26 Aug 09

Re: Drying bay leaves?

true mummza, it's available for all kind of leaves you want to dry. as slowest as possible.

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#10 Mon 21 Sep 09 10:30pm

ACDC

Forum champ
Occupation Bewitched, bothered and bewildered Mother
From Ireland
Member since Tue 19 Aug 08

Re: Drying bay leaves?

I sometimes hang a bunch of tied leaves in the kitchen to dry, but I also use the leaves fresh from the tree. Both taste good.

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