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#21 Sun 22 Aug 10 4:24am

katywood

Member
Member since Sun 22 Aug 10

Re: Food Revolution in Australia

Hey Jamie,

My name is Katelyn Wood. I'm 13 years old (turning 14 this November) and you are my absolute favorite chef in the whole entire world. I love how you don't only cook amazing food, but you teach others and you use your skills to help people.

I think your idea of the food revolution is amazing and I watch your TV show about it every Friday night when it's aired on channel 10 in Sydney, Australia. I really hope that you can come to Australia as I know obesity is a growing problem here crossed . I think people will be willing to let you into their hearts and homes and will let you teach them the basics of healthy eating and how fun it is to cook.

After watching the first episode of your show I've been hassling my mum every night, asking her if I can cook dinner. I usually win her over tongue  .

I just want to thank you so much for opening my eyes to the world of cooking, I love it! I also want to thank you for aiming to make a difference in the world, trying to use your power to do good, and that's exactly what your doing.

Please come to Australia and educate us Aussies on how to lead a more healthy lifestyle.

Much Love,
Katy Wood
Sydney, Australia.

Last edited by katywood (Sun 22 Aug 10 4:39am)

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#22 Sun 22 Aug 10 6:15am

emmyhwats

Member
Member since Fri 20 Aug 10

Re: Food Revolution in Australia

Hey Jamie,
My son was recently in hospital and I was shocked to see the crap they dish up to sick people. It's inedible. How about teaching our hospital kitchens how to cook edible, cheap and healthy food for the sickest of the sick! No more processed, dry, foul food. Save our hospitals!!!

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#23 Mon 23 Aug 10 3:13am

lizzieo

Member
Member since Sat 21 Aug 10

Re: Food Revolution in Australia

It makes me very concerned that people think that because the government has endorsed the school canteen lunch menu with 'healthy option' and low fat that parents are being lulled into a false sense of security that the meals are healthy. In fact most of the kids go for the burgers and nuggets and cheesy melts on white bread and sugary drinks with not a vegetable in sight. Not to mention the lollies and chips which continue to be sold and the flavoured milks that are on the menu. These are processed foods full of artificial ingredients to give them a long shelf life. When processed foods are sold as heathy option, low fat or low GI it is a con. What it means is that the food has added salt and sugar and E numbers to give it any taste. Low fat yogurt actually has more sugar and calories than the normal stuff. For years margarine was sold as the healthy alternative to butter, now they have found out it is full of trans fats which are far more damaging than the saturated fats in butter.

It also scares me that over here parents are being conned into buying unhealthy food by advertising that claims that food is in fact ultra-healthy. For example a certain icecream manufacturer advertises their product as being healthy because it contributes to the daily calcium intake (see any resemblance to the flavoured milks).  Also those completely fake cheese stringers and cheese dips made by a certain manufacturer. They are pure plastic. A few years ago we had an ex-playschool presenter advertising cocoa pops as healthy because it contains calcium. Cocoa pops are 39% sugar and just contribute to kids becoming addicted to that high sugar taste which is what the food processing industry want. Another example is the Iron man cereal. It is full of sugar and no way would contribute to a healthy child but is advertised like that. Nuttella is actually sold as a low GI product perfect for kids' breakfast. If you look at the ingredients, Nuttella is actually over 50% sugar and 30% fat. I can go on and on with lists of foods that are sold as healthy that are pure junk, fruit straps, a lot of muesli bars etc etc. Don't believe the manufacturer's hype. They are marketing their product and will do anything to twist the facts and make their product look healthy to sell more and they are very good at it. Remember - cigarretes were once sold as being good for your health.

I found the book "In Defense of Foods" by Michael Pollan really helpful or if you want to go really technical Anti-Cancer - an new way of life by David Servan-Schreiber.

It is so sad our job as parents is made even harder by the false claims made by manufacturers but if we are aware that it is happening we can avoid falling into those traps.

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#24 Sun 12 Sep 10 6:59am

cengland

Forum champ
Occupation teacher
From Darwin, Australia
Member since Wed 08 Sep 10

Re: Food Revolution in Australia

Australia is a huge country.  Set it over Europe and it will cover from Portugal to Turkey.  Even within Australia, there is a tendency to focus just on the cities, and especially Melbourne, Canberra and Sydney in the South-East.  But there are other cities and towns stretched far and wide, and a great deal of country in between.  The population is diverse, so is the climate, and so is people's access to foodstuffs, goods and services.

I grew up in in NSW in the South-East, but I currently live in Darwin (with a partner in the Air Force, on posting here).  Darwin is the capital city of the Northern Territory, in the Australian tropics, so hot all year round with a wet season and a dry season.  The permanent population is about 125,000 I think, which can double in the dry season with tourism.  So it's not a huge city, but it's not at all small. 

In the year and a bit that we've been in Darwin, we've found one real fresh produce store in the city.  One.  Otherwise there are some street markets held weekly during the dry season that have a bit of fruit and veg, but much more fast food and craft.  The fresh produce shop is about the size of a large living room, and it's about 20km from where we live.  But we go there, because we have a problem with the supermarket duopoly in Australia (Coles and Woolworths).  There also seems to be only one delicatessen of sorts.  You can get seafood, although weirdly, most of it seems to be imported and frozen.  Butchers and meat shops are more prevalent.

It's hard to find out, but it seems most of the fruit and veg is trucked up from down south, over 3000km away.  That takes days, so the produce is not at its best and doesn't keep at all well when it arrives.  As happens everywhere, the supermarkets don't seem to understand how to deal with produce at all, buying for look and size and storage, rather than for nutrients and flavour.  So much produce now comes wrapped in plastic.  But you find greens have been wrapped up all wet, so the spinach or lettuce is rotted inside the packet. 

In the supermarkets, it's not uncommon to see the shopping trolleys full of white bread and junk food.  A trolley with a slab of beer and two loaves of white bread is still something my partner and I comment on.  About half the milk section in my local supermarket is taken up with sweet, flavoured milks.

I think if I’d grown up in Darwin, I wouldn’t know about or like fruit and veg, and good food generally, nearly as much as I do.

The 'garden' to our house is mostly concrete, but we have plans to turn a couple of small beds currently populated by dwarf palms into a small vegie patch (although we're concerned about managing the rainfall in the wet season).

We very much support the ideals and goals of the Ministry of Food and related Jamie Oliver campaigns.  Having just finished a graduate teaching degree, I am passionate about the issue for children and schools.  The more people in Australia who can be educated to an understanding of nutrition, good food and healthy habits, the better.  Thanks.

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#25 Sun 12 Sep 10 7:22am

JoyYamDaisy

Forum super champ
From Melbourne Australia
Member since Sun 12 Apr 09

Re: Food Revolution in Australia

Hi Cengland,

When I lived in Darwin Rapid Creek was my regular and I am glad to see it is still going strong! It does go the whole year around! It was the best place to get fruit and veg.

Sad to hear that things haven't changed re the supermarkets. It was like that 20 years ago ~ the produce trucked down to Adelaide to be processed and then back to Darwin to be sold.

Good luck with the garden! Do you watch the Darwin segments on Gardening Australia? O the yummy things you will be able to grow!

Cheers

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#26 Mon 13 Sep 10 2:31am

cengland

Forum champ
Occupation teacher
From Darwin, Australia
Member since Wed 08 Sep 10

Re: Food Revolution in Australia

Thanks JoyYamDaisy.  We'll have to try Rapid Creek.  We'd heard that Parap was supposed to be the best, but were pretty disappointed there.

We do watch Gardening Australia sometimes.  Those segments are what made me think we could do it up here.   smile   I'm so glad they added them to the show. 

Cheers.

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#27 Mon 13 Sep 10 4:17am

JoyYamDaisy

Forum super champ
From Melbourne Australia
Member since Sun 12 Apr 09

Re: Food Revolution in Australia

Cheers.
My daughter used to beg me to let us move from Melbourne to Darwin so that she could have a mango tree! lol
I bet you will be eating your own produce before you know it! Do keep us informed on it all! smile

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#28 Mon 13 Sep 10 4:26am

cengland

Forum champ
Occupation teacher
From Darwin, Australia
Member since Wed 08 Sep 10

Re: Food Revolution in Australia

Mmmm, mangoes ... yummy  I wouldn't exactly move up here for'em, but  yummy

Righto.   smile

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#29 Thu 16 Sep 10 3:37am

molnar

Member
Member since Thu 16 Sep 10

Re: Food Revolution in Australia

Hi Jamie,

I am a project worker for the Ardoch Youth Foundation in Melbourne - a Not-for-profit organisation that support schools in disadvantaged areas.  I work in an area where many face economic and social difficulties about an hour from the city centre of Melbourne.  Our foundation has been partnered with the local Good Guys (they are champions!!) who supports both of us. Their generosity has been wonderful in support of  governement schools in the area by setting up gardens, breakfast clubs, excursions, and even members of the local Good Guys volunteering their time to support a local primary school as mentors. 

Despite the transcience and lack of knowledge in healthy eatiing habits characterized in the area, there is a distinct community feeling of good people who want the best for their families and children.  While some struggle, or do not have cars, or jobs at times, we all do our best to get along.  The fact that there is NO accessable fresh food grocer or butcher within the area (yet a McDonalds, KFC, and several other fast food chains) highlights the lack of options for families.  Lack of knowledge or understanding about food and gardening means no fresh vegies and fruit.   While the Good Guys, Ardoch Foundation and local government have helped support many projects (the building of school gardens and providing movable cooking trolleys for classrooms to use) - more needs to be done.  We would love to touch not just the children, but the entire community at large.   

I put the challenge to you - can you inspire the change for health, well being, respect for ourselves, knowledge of food and cooking, and love of community and sharing back into an area that is often avoided and overlooked? 

cheers,
Heather

Last edited by molnar (Thu 16 Sep 10 3:40am)

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#30 Thu 16 Sep 10 6:08am

AlineRR

Member
Member since Thu 16 Sep 10

Re: Food Revolution in Australia

Hi Jamie and members,
I just wanted to say that i found this forum really fantastic. The stories and opinions here are inspiring!
I am brazilian and currently live in Tasmania, and since I moved here I was shocked by the 'food culture' I found.
I lived in Brazil until my twenties and have always eaten fresh home made food, fruit straight from the trees, salad as part of every meal. Food was for good taste, never for the eye. In my family, lunch time was always a time to seat at the table and share the food with the rest of the family. After that I moved to England where I found food was a disaster, specially after I joined the hospitality industry. Then I moved to Italy were again I found the food celebration I always enjoyed, and I started to learn a lot about it.
And then I moved to Australia... As I knew about the natural beauties and wonders of this land I never thought the food would be so poor. It makes me sad to see such a great country wasted in processed food and artificial flavourings, fat and sugary diet.
I live in Launceston which is not a big city (100.000 mark people i guess) and it is really depressing that if you wanna find good food here you have to pay a lot of money for it in restaurants cause there is not many alternatives. Also, people don't seem to be bothered with the amount of chemicals and preservatives they eat.
My daughter is only 23 months old and in day care she gets given sugary afternoon tea almost every day.
Parents don't seem to even give their children pure water to drink, they rather give cordials instead.
At the supermarket all I see in people's trolleys is chips, frozen chips, flavoured milk, white bread, packed meals, and chocolate. I can not remember ever seeing someone reading labels of stuff they were buying.
Many of the food you find also comes from china, and I ask myself why??
People consider Domino's good 'italian' pizza and McDonalds a good restaurant.
Most veggies and fruits come from the main land and get sprayed before entering the island, as if there were not enough pesticides on it already.
I could probably write here hundreds of reasons why i feel terrified with the food.
But worse than that, I wonder what's gonna happen with my little girl, growing up in between all this... Even though I cook fresh balanced food every day, pack her lunch box full of fruits and healthy meals, read labels of everything I buy, check for the amount of sugar, salt, fat, preservatives, etc.
I feel exhausted every time I have to go to the supermarket cause is like I have to fight not to be tricked. Also, to discuss food with people I know here is hard work, as good quality food for them means 'gourmet meals' and is the same as 'expensive and hard'.
Of course there are a few local markets, with a bit of fresh produce, but is difficult access for most of the population.
My opinion is people lack information and education about what they are eating and feeding their children with. And for me as a foreigner is a big deal and I also found really difficult to have access to information on preservatives, additives, pesticides and all that crap I have to deal with everyday.
So maybe making things a bit more obvious for people, and showing them that food  doesn't have to be so complex could make a bit of difference.
I personally can't wait to see the Food Revolution come to Australia, and see all this brilliant people start to enjoy all the good stuff they are so lucky to be able to get from their own soil!
Brig it on!




big_smile  big_smile

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