forum: Food & Drink

Subscribe to forums RSS

#1 Thu 16 Dec 10 5:33pm

skinnerbox

Member
Member since Thu 16 Dec 10

Double cream or whipping cream?

Hi everyone!

I am new to these forums and was wondering if anyone could help me with a question I have.
I want to make a white and milk chocolate torte and the recipe asks for double cream to be used in the cake filling. I'm based in Canada and its very difficult to get double cream here. Will it make a huge difference in the way the torte turns out if I substitute the double cream with whipping cream (35%)? Or should it be something heavier?

Thanks in advance!
F.A

    Likes (0)

#2 Thu 16 Dec 10 7:40pm

luckiest1

Member
Member since Fri 19 Jun 09

Re: Double cream or whipping cream?

I was under the impression that double cream and whipping cream were the same thing?  But I could be wrong.  I am also in Canada and that is what I use when it calls for double cream.

    Likes (0)

#3 Thu 16 Dec 10 8:00pm

karenlesley

Member
Occupation Retired
From Blandford Forum, Dorset
Member since Sun 26 Sep 10

Re: Double cream or whipping cream?

Hi Skinnerbox,
big_smile Double cream is thicker than whipping cream, I'm pretty sure it's called heavy cream in America. If you have a cream maker I think the ratio is 1/2 cup of full cream milk to 1 cup of unsalted butter, melt together gently and beat like mad, but don't go too far or you will end up with butter and milk.
Karen

    Likes (0)

#4 Thu 16 Dec 10 9:39pm

Anna

Forum champ
From Switzerland
Member since Fri 15 Apr 05

Re: Double cream or whipping cream?

I think you'd be fine using the 35% stuff.  The type of cream we usually get in Switzerland is only 30% and I use it when recipes call for double cream.  Never really had a problem!

Last edited by Anna (Thu 16 Dec 10 9:41pm)

    Likes (0)

#5 Thu 16 Dec 10 10:20pm

skinnerbox

Member
Member since Thu 16 Dec 10

Re: Double cream or whipping cream?

@luckiest1
I thought so too until I began googling the different types of creams but most supermarkets here use double cream and whipping cream interchangeably. Anyway, I'll try out the whipping cream smile.

@Karen
Thanks for your feedback. I actually don't have a cream maker but I'll definitely keep
your tip in mind though.

@Anna
Thanks! Going to try it out and see how it goes from there.

    Likes (0)

#6 Thu 16 Dec 10 10:33pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Double cream or whipping cream?

This looks quite an interesting site....this is what they said about the definitions of cream in the UK ...I have copied it over as I know some people have trouble in acessing some sites.

http://www.notdelia.co.uk/confused-about-cream/

Confused about cream?

With all the various types of cream on the market and in recipes, it’s easy to lose sight of what they’re all for…

Can you substitute whipping cream for single cream? Or the other way round? Can you use half the amount of double cream if you don’t happen to have single? What about crème fraîche – isn’t that’s just French for ‘fresh cream’? And what about UHT cream, cream substitutes and all of those things?

I’ve had a dig around to find out exactly what’s what.

Basically, cream is the part of the milk that contains more dairy fat than the rest – the layer that rises to the top in the traditional milk bottle. The cream can be used for different purposes depending on how much fat it contains, and to make things easier for consumers, different names are given to creams to show their fat content.

The confusion comes in when you’re living in one country but using a book intended for another – for instance, if you’re living in the UK but using an Australian book, you might find yourself desperately trying to whip single cream and wondering why you’re not getting anywhere! ‘Single cream’ in the UK contains about half the fat that Australian ‘pure cream’ does and won’t whip no matter how long you spend trying.
United Kingdom

The terms defined by British law are:
Single cream

This is unsterilised cream containing a minimum of 18% fat. It’s a general-purpose cooking cream and is also suitable for pouring over desserts and using in coffee.
Sterilised cream

Must contain a minimum of 23% fat. Use as for single cream.
Double cream

This cream can be either sterilised or fresh, but must contain at least 48% fat. It whips easily, and the thickness means it can be piped.
Whipping cream/Whipped cream

Again, it can be either fresh or sterilised, but must contain a minimum of 35% fat – the only difference between the two is that whipping cream is ready for whipping, whipped cream has already been whipped. It doesn’t whip up as thickly as double cream, so you may have trouble piping it.
Clotted cream

Clotted cream is clotted by slow heat treatment – causing it to partially evaporate and thus become thicker. It’s even thicker than double cream – it has to contain at least a whopping 55% of milk fat, nearly as much as some home-made butters. (Commercially produced butter typically contains over 80%.) Very much a specialist cream, for use with traditional recipes like scones and stargazy pie.
Half cream/Sterilised half cream

Has to contain no less than 12% dairy fat.
Other creams, dairy or otherwise
UHT cream

UHT can stand for ‘ultra-high temperature’ or ‘ultra-heat treatment’. Either way, it involves raising cream way above the usual temperature for sterilisation, but for a much shorter period of time – so the change in taste and colour is much smaller than is involved with sterilised cream. It’s a good standby if you can’t get fresh.
Sour or soured cream

This is cream with a similar fat content to single cream, which has been soured and thickened by the controlled action of lactic acid bacteria.
Crème fraîche

Not, as you might think, fresh cream at all! It’s another sour cream, but with a higher fat content – typically more like 28-30%.
Artifical or imitation cream

This is a substitute for cream, made using non-dairy fat or oil. Some of it, like Elmlea, can be quite good, with a similar taste and mouth-feel to cream. It also lasts a lot longer than fresh dairy cream, so – like UHT cream – it can be worth keeping a tub or two to hand just in case you’re stuck for the real thing.

The synthetic whipped ‘cream’ used in some cheap commercially produced cakes, on the other hand, is disgusting. You can generally tell it by the colour; whereas real whipped cream generally has a yellowish tinge to it, the synthetic stuff is usually brilliant white, almost bluish tinged by comparison.

    Likes (0)

#7 Thu 16 Dec 10 10:34pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Double cream or whipping cream?

Cream in the US...
From this site...
http://www.notdelia.co.uk/confused-about-us-cream/

Confused about US cream?

It’s easy enough to get confused about cream if you’re in the UK and using a British cook book. If you then start using a US cook book, or have to deal with American ingredients, the confusion’s that much greater!

So let’s have a look at cream and the different varieties available in the US market.
United States

It gets worse! The situation’s more complex in the US than it is in the UK because not only do you have Federal legislation from the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) – the States have a say, too, so potentially you’ve got 51 different sets of definitions to deal with! However, here’s a rough guide.
Light cream (or coffee cream/table cream)

Light cream ranges from 18% to 30% milkfat content, so it equates roughly to the UK definition of single cream.
Whipping cream (or light whipping cream)

This contains not less than 30% milkfat but less than 36%, so it’s a bit thinner than UK whipping cream (and closer to the type of whipping cream that’s available in continental Europe).
Heavy cream (or heavy whipping cream)

This has to contain not less than 36% milkfat – so it’s at least as thick as UK whipping cream, but may be considerably less thick than double cream.
Extra-heavy cream (or double cream/manufacturer’s cream)

Not generally available to the retail market except through some warehouse and specialist traders, this is generally about 38-40% fat content cream, so still a bit less thick than UK double cream.
Half-and-half

This is a rough equivalent to mixing equal volumes of light cream and milk. It must contain between 10.5% and 18% fat, so it equates to UK half cream (although it may be a little thinner).

Any of the above may also contain stabilisers and/or emulsifiers. They must be pasteurised or ultra-pasteurised (UHT, in other words), and may be homogenised.
Other creams, dairy or otherwise
Sour cream (or cultured sour cream)

Much the same as the UK definition; cream with at least 18% fat content that’s been soured by lactic acid producing bacteria.
Acidified sour cream

This is cream that’s been soured by the addition of acidifiers which may or may not include the natural souring bacteria.
Cool Whip

This isn’t cream at all – it’s a non-dairy substitute, made essentially of water, corn syrup and flavourings. Be warned.

Oh yes, and US cream may contain sweeteners or flavourings (natural or artificial) too. Something to be aware of if you’re planning to cook with the cream you’re considering buying.

    Likes (0)

#8 Thu 16 Dec 10 10:34pm

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Double cream or whipping cream?

Mummza, i've started a thread over in faqs on this topic, would you mind reposting this lovely info there?

    Likes (0)

#9 Thu 16 Dec 10 10:36pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Double cream or whipping cream?

Cream in Australia and New Zealand..
From this site...
http://www.notdelia.co.uk/confused-about-ausnz-cream/

Confused about Aus/NZ cream?

It’s easy enough to get confused about cream if you’re in the UK and using a British cook book. If you then start using a Australian cook book, or have to deal with New Zealand ingredients, the confusion’s that much greater!

So let’s have a look at cream and the different varieties available in the Australian and New Zealand markets.
Australia and New Zealand

One bit of (comparative) good news is that food standards in Australia and New Zealand are dealt with by a single bi-national government agency, Food Standards Australia New Zealand. So you don’t have the same problems that you do, say, in multiple jurisdictions like the US and the EU.

Not only that, but there are fewer definitions to wrestle with, too. The very basic standard for cream is that it must contain no less than 350g of milk fat per kilogram; and that the final composition of cream obtained by separation from milk may be adjusted by adding milk or milk-derived products. So it seems that when you buy Aussie or Kiwi cream, you’re actually getting something which isn’t chock full of additives, which is good. (As long as it’s not thickened cream – see below!)
Pure cream

This is the basic standard for cream in Aus and NZ. It contains 35% fat, so it’s quite heavy – it equates roughly to the UK definition of whipping cream.
Light cream

This contains 18% fat and therefore equates pretty much directly to UK single cream.
Other creams, dairy or otherwise
Sour cream

Much the same as the UK definition of crème fraîche, but a little heavier; pure cream that’s been soured by lactic acid producing bacteria. The fat content percentage is generally in the high 30s (38% or so).
Light sour cream

This is more like UK sour or soured cream – 18% fat cream soured by lactic acid producing bacteria.
Canned cream (reduced-fat)

This must contain at least 25% fat, so it’s rather thicker than UK single cream. Don’t be misled by the ‘(reduced-fat)’ in the name!
Commercial whipped aerosol cream

This comes in at about 28% milk fat, though it’s not reduced-fat as such – it’s produced by mixing cream with a propellant (usually nitrous oxide) and adding stabilisers, emulsifiers and sugar.
Thickened cream

This refers to a process – it’s possible to get thickened cream at either 35% or 18% fat. The thickening is done by separating the milk into a highly concentrated milk fat stream (cream) and a non-milk fat stream (skimmed milk) and adding gelatine and/or vegetable gum to increase the viscosity.
UHT thickened cream

Aus/NZ ultra high temperature thickened cream is pure cream that’s had vegetable gum added and then been heated to 133°C-140°C for at least one second before packaging to give it longer shelf life and higher viscosity. Comes in at 35% fat.
Bookmark and Share

    Likes (0)

#10 Thu 16 Dec 10 10:37pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Double cream or whipping cream?

skinnerbox , welcome to the forum, I hope that the above will help you.

    Likes (0)

Powered by PunBB.