Jamie Oliver

forum: Gardening / Growing

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#1 Mon 14 Nov 11 5:52pm

aaronjunited

Member
From N.Ireland, Belfast
Member since Tue 27 Jan 09

Thyme

You know the pots of herbs you buy in Tesco.

I bough the thyme the other day and put it on a saucer with a little water. It continues to look fine. Now i notice when i pour some water in up around the base of the pot, about a cm up, about an hour later its gone.

Any tips for growing thyme and how look after it?
Also how do you pick thyme for use when cooking?

Thanks
Aaron.

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#2 Mon 14 Nov 11 7:20pm

Kye

Forum super champ
Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: Thyme

Thyme doesn't need much attention, mine grows in a rock garden, in fact i don't look after it at all, i suppose that you could just touch the earth sometimes to see if it needs water...Just seperate/devide it when it gets too woody (less leaves)...with older plants at 3 or 4 yrs old.

Just cut off the branches when you need them for cooking.

It loves sun as its a Mediterranean plant.

Last edited by kye in france (Mon 14 Nov 11 7:25pm)

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#3 Mon 14 Nov 11 11:39pm

JoyYamDaisy

Forum super champ
From Melbourne Australia
Member since Sun 12 Apr 09

Re: Thyme

I agree, too much water won't suit it.
They may have it in a very spongy potting mix which can hold a lot of water.

I have mine in the garden, a big plant now. Cutting off the sprigs for cooking also help prune it.

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#4 Tue 15 Nov 11 12:19am

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Thyme

This may not be helpful, but I grew an heirloom French variety outdoors, started from seed.  It was suggested on the packet that I treat it as an 'annual' and I did.  I found in our climate, they go woody and don't produce as much after one season.  I started a new batch in winter and transferred them outside when it was time and they were quite nice.  They make a nice border to keep weeds down.

I have another variety growing inside in a pot right now and am hoping not to have to replace it.

(funny, each type will have a slightly different taste and aroma, so you may want to try a few to see what you like)  That French heirloom was delicious.

Last edited by MsPablo (Tue 15 Nov 11 12:22am)

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#5 Wed 29 Feb 12 9:46pm

christian_halfm

Member
Occupation Sometimes I would like to know myself (or like to change it).
From Germany
Member since Thu 17 Mar 11

Re: Thyme

The one I had inside did not survive - maybe not the right amount of water at the right time. However, in the garden the thyme went well without any special attention. I'm only not sure whether it survived the -15C this winter.

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#6 Wed 29 Feb 12 11:48pm

Kye

Forum super champ
Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: Thyme

The old thyme is still beautifully spreading even after the icy winter, its branches are starting to touch the soil again and this time i'll push them down to have new plants from the old.

Another that was planted last year gave very little and has almost disappeared.

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#7 Thu 01 Mar 12 9:56am

Ashen

Forum champ
Occupation Why is the Rum always gone???!
From out to lunch
Member since Sat 07 Jan 06

Re: Thyme

It really takes a lot to kill off thyme.. It is one of the few herbs that overwinters here just fine  almost every year.  -15C  even for weeks on end shouldn't  bother it whatsoever.


Only a fool argues with a skunk, a mule or a cook.  { cowboy saying}
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#8 Thu 01 Mar 12 10:23am

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Thyme

the pots that we get in supermarkets are not quite the same the thyme that is grown outside , its quite a spindly plant , with seedings that have been forced on to grow .
Unlike a nursery grown pot plant which has had a longer growing thyme  big_smile
The nursery grown plants are more likely to survive than the supermarket pots.

I think that the supermarket pots of growing thyme are not realy meant to survive long , they are  a poorer quality of plant from what I see of them. It of course might just be the variety of thye that is sown in these pots .

Unlike the woody type of thye that you get frm plant nurseries and garden centers , these supermarket pots have plants with long soft stems and they just do not last well.
I a only ever sucessful at transplanting then to the outside garden in the summer and even then the plants do not survive for many months.

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#9 Fri 16 Mar 12 12:08am

Kye

Forum super champ
Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: Thyme

The extended branch has now been pushed into the earth with a little root powder and black soil to help it. We are waiting for it to give us baby woodies before seperating next year.

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#10 Thu 22 Mar 12 11:39pm

JoyYamDaisy

Forum super champ
From Melbourne Australia
Member since Sun 12 Apr 09

Re: Thyme

My thyme has grown so big it is deadish in the middle. Would getting the outskirts of it under some soil to grow more roots, be the best thing to do? I fear cutting it back!

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