forum: Food & Drink

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#1 Mon 19 Dec 11 4:53am

ladyhawk727

Member
Member since Sun 18 Dec 11

stodgy pudding

This a longshot but when i was a little girl in England !(1967) my grandmother used to make a stodgy pudding it had lots of fruit and it looked like a cake it was dark in color and was cooked in a cake tin, when i left for Australia i never had it again and i have asked my mother but she does not recall i know it is asking alot but can anyone help me help

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#2 Mon 19 Dec 11 11:34am

Kye

Forum super champ
Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: stodgy pudding

This one must be very 'stodgy':
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/ … ick-103210

Otherwise have a look at this forum where 'stodgy' puddings are discussed:
http://forum.wordreference.com/showthre … p;langid=6

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#3 Mon 19 Dec 11 1:10pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: stodgy pudding

welome to the forum ladyhawk727

To me it sounds a bit ike a name the famiy have made up to discrribe what they were eating !

Could it be a 'boiled fruit cake' ?
My neighbour makes one of those.

I have a few old cook bookd that I can look for a recipe as you discribe , but doubt if I will get uch chance this week.
Any detail that you can remember abut the stodgy pudding would be appreiated as it would help me narrow down the search.

And do remind me to look as I am busy at the moment as my family will all be arriving soon so I might well forget !
roll

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#4 Mon 19 Dec 11 2:19pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: stodgy pudding

If it was steamed or boiled, was it maybe something like a clootie dumpling?

http://www.scottishrecipes.co.uk/clootiedumpling.htm (that's an example recipe, I've never tried it)

It's traditionally tied into a flour cloth and boiled, but it can be made in a pudding basin, or a watertight cake tin, I suppose. It turns out like a very dense fruit cake and can be eaten warm with custard - or fried with bacon for breakfast, but that's a Scottish peculiarity.

On the other hand, if it was baked in the oven, it's more likely a heavy fruit cake, maybe a boiled fruit cake as was suggested ("boiled" here refers to the method of combining some of the ingredients by cooking in a pan, not the cooking method of the whole cake, which is baked).

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#5 Mon 19 Dec 11 10:25pm

minerva

Forum champ
Occupation Walking the Old Ways
From Living in the Wild Woods
Member since Wed 16 Jan 08

Re: stodgy pudding

Boiled Fruit Cake is called this because ingredients are heated together in a pan on the hob, before being oven-baked.
I have a couple of old recipes if this is indeed what you are thinking of.

Your description of it being cooked in a "cake tin" threw me, Ladyhawke, because up to that point I had been thinking it might be a steamed pudding (ie Spotted Dick) or even a boiled suet pudding (ie Roly-poly)...........but they are cooked either in a covered basin or in a pudding cloth in a pan of simmering water.

It might help if you could tell me what part of the country your grandma was from as regional/local names vary.

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#6 Mon 19 Dec 11 10:34pm

falconcy

Forum champ
Occupation Project Manager
From Limassol, Cyprus
Member since Tue 19 Dec 06

Re: stodgy pudding

Yeah, if it's a traditional regional dish, I have a good book that covers most of the local recipes for each area.

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#7 Wed 21 Dec 11 9:46am

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: stodgy pudding

Yeah, the cake tin thing threw me as well. Although you could boil a pudding in a cake tin, provided it wasn't a loose-bottomed one.

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