Jamie Oliver

forum: Everything else

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#21 Tue 21 Feb 12 6:50pm

Kye

Forum super champ
Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: British<->American

mummza wrote:

no Kye french toast is like eggy bread !
French toast..
http://www.google.co.uk/search?tbm=isch … l487l8l8l0

Bread pudding ..
http://www.essentially-england.com/bread-pudding.html

and ..
Bread and butter pudding
http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/bread … ddin_85936

Stein, Gertrude (1874–1946)        
“What is the answer?” No answer came. She laughed and said, “In that case what is the question?”


And who was the Lady that snuggled a French baguette out of French Land through Eurotunnel Customs... wink hidden under her travelling cloak and which looked suspectingly rifle shaped wink ... thats a good question hmm  tongue

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#22 Tue 21 Feb 12 7:48pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: British<->American

no ....I did not take the bagettes out under my coat , I brazenly carried then peeping out of my bag , several of them !

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#23 Tue 21 Feb 12 9:47pm

Bellstafflove

Member
Occupation Coordinator
From Iowa
Member since Mon 13 Feb 12

Re: British<->American

Mangetout = Snow Pea

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#24 Tue 21 Feb 12 11:23pm

Kye

Forum super champ
Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: British<->American

Mange-tout = The outside and inside of vegetable (pod and seed) are eaten.

Mange-tout = eat all.

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#25 Tue 21 Feb 12 11:48pm

mincepie

Forum champ
From uk
Member since Tue 07 Oct 08

Re: British<->American

Heavy cream = double cream
eggy bread=french toast=pain perdu
all purpose flour=plain flour
shortening=pastry fat
and I think half and half=single cream
and I think baking soda =baking powder not bicarb.

If the last 2 are wrong please correct me.

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#26 Wed 22 Feb 12 4:53am

Kaitlyn

Member
Occupation Stuff and nonsense!
From California
Member since Mon 07 Sep 09

Re: British<->American

Kiwi Kris wrote:

Whoops! Sorry there, Kaitlyn...after reading both Joy's & Mummza's comments - I've just clicked that you meant other food terms not just eggplant!!

Are pancakes called flapjacks (or are they the same?) over in the U.S.?

American hotdogs are a bun + sausage + fav sauce/pickles etc...in N.Z. a hotdog is a battered sausage on-a-stick (much like your corn dogs!)!  Hmm! I'm racking my brain now  hmm  !! wink

No worries, Kris! 

I've heard 'joint' (for large cut of meat w/bone)--I have the Cats soundtrack (Mungojerrie and Rumpleteaser).

"Chips' (for French fries) and 'crisps' (for potato chips) are familiar, too. 

Pancakes?  I think pancakes and flapjacks might be used interchangably. 

The one translation that doesn't make sense: Graham crackers, aka 'digestive biscuits'.  Makes it sound like something one would take for indigestion.   hmm

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#27 Wed 22 Feb 12 9:43am

Ashen

Forum champ
Occupation Why is the Rum always gone???!
From out to lunch
Member since Sat 07 Jan 06

Re: British<->American

mincepie wrote:

Heavy cream = double cream
eggy bread=french toast=pain perdu
all purpose flour=plain flour
shortening=pastry fat
and I think half and half=single cream
and I think baking soda =baking powder not bicarb.

If the last 2 are wrong please correct me.

baking soda is bicarbonate of soda and is a base
baking powder is a mix  of base and acid . most are double acting meaning part of the mix has a reaction when water is added and another part doesn't react til water and a proper level of heat is  added. This means that it continues to blow up bubbles in the oven.


Only a fool argues with a skunk, a mule or a cook.  { cowboy saying}
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#28 Wed 22 Feb 12 9:47am

mincepie

Forum champ
From uk
Member since Tue 07 Oct 08

Re: British<->American

Yes Kaitlyn the original digestive was marketed as aid to digestion due to the amount of baking soda used in the recipe. the baking soda would decompose under heating thereby raising the biscuit and making it ineffectual as a digestive aid but thats marketing 200 plus years ago. No doubt the roughage content had an effect.

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#29 Wed 22 Feb 12 10:23pm

Birdymum

Forum champ
From Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Member since Thu 23 Oct 08

Re: British<->American

MsPablo wrote:

-Cornstarch doesn't equal cornflour.  Cornstarch is 100% pure corn starch, no wheat; from what I understand, British cornflour is a fine wheat, something like Wondra flour
'

Just to be confusing cornflour = cornstarch here and comes in both wheaten and pure corn varieties
rockmelon = cantaloupe

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#30 Wed 22 Feb 12 11:25pm

mincepie

Forum champ
From uk
Member since Tue 07 Oct 08

Re: British<->American

Cornflour here is milled maize/corn, wheat and gluten free.

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