Jamie Oliver

forum: Food & Drink

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#11 Sun 02 Nov 08 9:10pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: self-raising flour

I find that if I have a seperate raising agent / baking powder then the instructions are on the side of the pot as for the amount to add to plain flour for each type of recipe.. e.g. sponge cakes , scones , biscuits .
Its a rough guide but it generally works ok.

Ashen , why do you add salt ?
I never add salt , 1/2 a teaspoon salt to a cup of flour seems a lot to me.

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#12 Sun 02 Nov 08 9:16pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: self-raising flour

Hadn't noticed that. 1/2 tsp definitely sounds like too much....

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#13 Sun 02 Nov 08 10:58pm

ush

Member
From A place very unlike home
Member since Wed 15 Oct 08

Re: self-raising flour

I was trying to find out how much baking soda to add to plain flour and I kept finding American sites with stupid US measurements - cups of this and cups of that etc. Eventually I found a site which used more sensible units. Ok so for anyone who doesn't know.

To make self-raising flour:

500g plain flour + 2 1/2 tsp. baking powder + a pinch of salt

Now maybe most of you know what 'cup' means but seriously, it is a stupid unit. I came across a recipe which said to use half a cup of butter. What the hell does that mean!

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#14 Sun 02 Nov 08 11:27pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: self-raising flour

not at all ush , its realy a very simple measurement. You can buy standard cup measures in most uk supermarkets very cheaply .
Cup measurements make weighing out ingredients for a cake quick and simple.

Butter is often refered to in American recipes as ...1 stick of butter. hmm  I seem to remember from a trip to the States  that a stick of butter is around 2oz , but I might be wrong there.

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#15 Sun 02 Nov 08 11:43pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: self-raising flour

ush, excuse me for posting cup measurments, it's what I am in the habit of using and I will try to convert my recipes to weight measures if they are not already.  I must buy kitchen scales and will ask advice on the forum for which ones to choose.  I've made mistakes in converting a few times and I have noticed minerva in particular will post both measures for me, what a doll she is to do that, thanks Minerva!  I should offer the same courtesy to all of you, sorry if I haven't, it's just habit.  I'm old. whistle

1 stick of butter in the U.S. is 4 ounces.

I would like to add that many things don't work the same way or are done differently depending on what part of the world you live in, learning about those differences gives you a window into some other corner of the globe, that's putting a nice shine to it, so there!

Last edited by MsPablo (Sun 02 Nov 08 11:48pm)

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#16 Mon 03 Nov 08 12:10am

Luvmegrub

Forum champ
Occupation Cleaner at The Salmon Arms
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Fri 22 Aug 08

Re: self-raising flour

MsPablo wrote:

I would like to add that many things don't work the same way or are done differently depending on what part of the world you live in, learning about those differences gives you a window into some other corner of the globe, that's putting a nice shine to it, so there!

clap
I love baking using a cup measure (in Australia 250ml is standard) - great for somebody like me, always trying to find the quickest way to do anything!

I can also use metric and imperial measurements but then I have to open the cupboard and take out my scales lol

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#17 Mon 03 Nov 08 12:36am

jdl

Member
From Melbourne, Australia
Member since Tue 12 Sep 06

Re: self-raising flour

Thank you MsPablo for the conversion of 1 stick of butter.
I have tried to use American cooking books before but have had difficulty finding the correct conversion for this.

Alot of my recipes are measured by cups and some even use a dessert spoon measurement which is not an offical measurement.  It all just keeps you thinking as you prepare your food.

Knowing the origin of a recipe is always helpful as cup sizes and spoon sizes do vary between countries.

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#18 Mon 03 Nov 08 2:16am

Ashen

Forum champ
Occupation Why is the Rum always gone???!
From out to lunch
Member since Sat 07 Jan 06

Re: self-raising flour

I actually just grap a heavy  pinch of salt to a cup myself  , and you add salt because most recipes that call for self rising don't add salt because it is already in the flour.   the salt doesn't do anything for the rising though so can be easily omitted if you wish.


Only a fool argues with a skunk, a mule or a cook.  { cowboy saying}
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#19 Mon 03 Nov 08 8:20am

madamada

Forum super champ
Occupation living life
From Friuli northern Italy
Member since Mon 14 Jan 08

Re: self-raising flour

for cup I mean a cappuccino cup MsP, with "once" I'm already lost, I think it's important to keep the balance between butter and flour and egg when you use them but I'm hopeless with dosis, my accuracy is the main topic of conversation at table, they never cease trying to get me to improove .......... the same attitude of teachers with students, my husband is a teacher and I'm a too old student to do any better than confusione wink

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#20 Mon 03 Nov 08 11:37am

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: self-raising flour

Are tablespoons universal?  Forgive my ignorance.  I would almost rather mail all of you some cup measures! lol

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