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#11 Thu 05 Aug 10 10:27pm

madamada

Forum super champ
Occupation living life
From Friuli northern Italy
Member since Mon 14 Jan 08

Re: Italian restaurant in London: very bad quality of food!

P.S.A carbonara sauce that isn't fresh seems normal but is a salmonela risk because of the eggs, I doubt any restaurant would be foolish enough to gamble with something like that.
I agree TSR smile

I interviewed my husband at supper and he told me his recipe

3 eggs for 2 people
parmigiano
parsley
salt and pepper

smoked pancetta lightly roasted but not burnt tossed on top of the cooked pasta mixed with the eggs mixture

he said to put the pan on the fire again would be killing his carbonara, it has to be watery then not eggs like frittata

that's why he takes his portion on his plate and I put the pan on the fire again

then you can go on discussing if guanciale is " the ingredient" for carbonara instead of pancetta

but this is another story



wink

Last edited by madamada (Thu 05 Aug 10 10:28pm)

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#12 Thu 05 Aug 10 11:19pm

DebDiMaggio

Forum champ
Occupation Newbie Mamma
From Italy-UK-Spain
Member since Mon 16 Jun 08

Re: Italian restaurant in London: very bad quality of food!

oh great lets have a carbonara thread  big_smile

what is the perfect carbonara big_smile ???


i agree with mada and msp

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#13 Fri 06 Aug 10 12:59am

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Italian restaurant in London: very bad quality of food!

Mmmm, classic carbonara and riffing on the original?  Yes!   big_smile

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#14 Fri 06 Aug 10 2:28pm

AliceTwain

Member
Member since Tue 11 May 10

Re: Italian restaurant in London: very bad quality of food!

sergio1972 wrote:

Carbonara sauce mainly consists of cream.

Sorrym but carbonara has no crea neither it has any sauce of any kind. Carbonara is just eggs and cheese beaten toghether and added to the pasta and tossed pancetta. So it can't be stale either, since carbonara sauce just dose not exist: pasta alla carbonara is born onlyt the very moment you add the eggs to the piping-hot pasta and pancetta and stir it around until it gets creamy.

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#15 Fri 06 Aug 10 2:43pm

SonomaEddie

Forum super champ
Occupation Chief cook and bottle washer
From Northern California
Member since Sat 10 Feb 07

Re: Italian restaurant in London: very bad quality of food!

That is the recipe I have always used too, Alice.  But a friend of mine in Sicily always uses cream in his.

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#16 Fri 06 Aug 10 3:48pm

AliceTwain

Member
Member since Tue 11 May 10

Re: Italian restaurant in London: very bad quality of food!

Many Italians do. The use of cream in several pasta recipes is a legacy of the late 1970's when it started being added to correct mistakes. Cream flattens out mistakes, smooths out the saltyness, hides away bad quality of the ingredients and burhes up stale stuff. In the 1970's a new dish appeared in many restaurants: pasta "dello chef", which was essentially all of yesterdays pasta sauce leftovers stirred toghether with a good measure of cream. Since then cream started to be added in about each and every pasta dish. Prosciutto and peas tagliatelle used to be just peas cooked in butter with added prosciutto dices, but this required a bit of accuracy to make the whole thing creamy: you had to drain your tagliatelle leaving a bit of water aside, toss the taglaitelle with the buttery mixture of prosciutto and peas, adding water to get enough starch to "stick" and make it all creamy enough. Adding cream solved the issue and made making this sauce easy, pity that it tasted of cream instead of peas and prosciutto! The same goes for mushroom or truffle pasta. The addiction of cream to carbonara is also supposed to help with creamyness: thoeretically, carbonara should be made only with the freshest, free-range, organic eggs, so that you minimize health risks with no need to cook the eggs. This is because carbonara required the egg to be essentially raw! Adding cream allows you to use cheaper, intensive-farmed eggs because you can now actually cook your eggs retaining the creamyness. Onm the other hand, these eggs taste much worse, and cream drains the egg taste so that you are not really tasting the egg, or so that any bad tastes get diluted and you notice them less. Essentually, adding cream is useful to restaurants who want to get rid of stale, cheap eggs.

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#17 Fri 06 Aug 10 4:02pm

nanstertoo

Forum champ
Occupation Retired nurse-midwife
From High Point, North Carolina
Member since Tue 17 Jun 08

Re: Italian restaurant in London: very bad quality of food!

Again, I will offer the thought that with all the thousands of people eating at Jamie's restaurant every week, we only occasionally hear of someone who is unhappy....

That being said, and I'm not sure how the business is set up, if Jamie is sole owner of each of those restaurants, he should be interested if food is being prepared improperly.  If they are "franchises" (do you have those there?), then the individual manager/owners are primarily responsible for the quality of the food.  That is why you will see a wide difference in the quality of food in some franchise chains, the man whose name is over the door has very little control of what's going on inside.  Jamie's empire has grown very quickly in the last few years, and it's only natural that he has to rely on others. 

I would love to be able to visit one of his restaurants.  I think he's a great guy and a wonderful chef, and if I had a bad meal, I would send it back to the kitchen, but not think that Jamie was personally responsible of one plate of bad pasta.

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#18 Mon 09 Aug 10 3:35pm

sergio1972

Forum champ
Occupation NLP Trainer and Coach
From Portugal
Member since Tue 09 Dec 08

Re: Italian restaurant in London: very bad quality of food!

Well I'd like to appologise to the original poster and also to thank you all for whats an amazing info to me. Carbonara was actually the first dish I was taught to cook. It was about 20 years ago. Obviously wasnt a chef who taught me and Ive always cooked it with cream (silly belief). Then a few years ago I read Jamie's recipe which also has cream and also lemon zest that really adds a great touch to it.

It goes to show that we are always learning... roll

Now this new info brings me to a question: do you use just egg yolks or both yolk and whites?

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#19 Mon 09 Aug 10 4:19pm

AliceTwain

Member
Member since Tue 11 May 10

Re: Italian restaurant in London: very bad quality of food!

Both, but it dipends on pasta amounts and eggs sizes. I f a whole egg seems too much, then I only use the yolk, so a carbonara for four may be made with 320 grams of pasta and three large eggs or three whole small eggs and one yolk.

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#20 Tue 25 Sep 12 9:32am

William12

Member
Member since Tue 25 Sep 12

Re: Italian restaurant in London: very bad quality of food!

I then take another look.Before going to any restaurant I have to find out information.You may also like
I use Restaau.co.uk -  intelligent search engine. With Restaau
•    You can filter search results easily by different aspects such as Cuisines, Distance, Price, Dinning Options, Good For, Star…
•    View details of a restaurant with telephone, location, photos, description and reviews from internet community about that restaurant.

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