forum: Gardening / Growing

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#51 Sun 08 Jan 12 1:43am

minerva

Forum champ
Occupation Walking the Old Ways
From Living in the Wild Woods
Member since Wed 16 Jan 08

Re: Food foraging around the UK

@nGoose1 wrote:

Try foraging Seaweed, check out my blog. I found a Native Oyster yesterday while doing so, it tasted exellent. As did the seaweed.

Just check that what you are foraging is legal..............!

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#52 Wed 11 Jan 12 11:05pm

@nGoose1

Forum champ
Occupation Shop worker/KP/ Commis chef
From UK/Germany
Member since Wed 28 Oct 09

Re: Food foraging around the UK

kye in france wrote:

@nGoose1 wrote:

The White Rabbit wrote:

An extension to my (much) earlier caution. Avoid old petrol station sites, they usually have contaminated the ground water and that moves very slowly so it will be there for a long long time and moving in the direction the ground water does.

Kye, I agree outside the fence is fair game. I asked a neighbour if I could take mulberries off the branches hanging over the fence on to the street. They cut down the tree. I'd even said if I'd not got a response I wouldn't do it....i even offered to share the jam. It was a famous person....one of the members of ACDC.

A whole lotta mullberries. Having a jam with someone from AC DC. Now that is cool.

(missed this) famous person or not, tell him to p*ss off.
noooo noooo noooo dont insult anyone from ACDC. Thats a bad move.  Problems with neighbours , so the guys had a tree growing on their lands, hanging over to another garden or path and refused to share. When neighbours trees pass the limit of garden fences...they become your very own property, branches with or without fruit ... you can cut them down or pick the fruits.

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#53 Thu 12 Jan 12 7:36pm

karenlesley

Member
Occupation Retired
From Blandford Forum, Dorset
Member since Sun 26 Sep 10

Re: Food foraging around the UK

If you live near Blandford there are walnut trees an The Milldown, but why do Rowans only seem to grow in graveyards - it seems almost sacriligeous to pick them for jelly. There are also apples on the bypass, and did you know you can make jam from the big fruits of Fuchsia?
Karen

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#54 Thu 12 Jan 12 7:56pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Food foraging around the UK

I have a theory about all those apple trees that grow along side the otorways and bypass roads. I think they are there because people chuck out their part eaten apples or apple cores out of the car window as they travel and every so often one germinates into an apple tree. I have noticed that there are all sorts of varietys of apples that grow .

I have to sya that I tried the fushia berries once and was unimpressed, fairly flavourless things !

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#55 Thu 19 Apr 12 12:24am

@nGoose1

Forum champ
Occupation Shop worker/KP/ Commis chef
From UK/Germany
Member since Wed 28 Oct 09

Re: Food foraging around the UK

Aleadras are not that nice, I tied them , I hear the roots are better. You cant just dig up plants, anywhere you go.So that might be some time in the future.

@nGoose1 wrote:

Hurahh, I now know what Alexandras are and there are lots of them. It has to be said though, they related to belladonna , thats a bit scary.
Anyone in the UK use colapsable pots or similar. I am thinking  for shrimp, shellfish, or prawn. That would be  without a boat.

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#56 Thu 19 Apr 12 8:43am

dhartley

Member
Occupation Office Wallah
From Yorkshire / E Sussex
Member since Thu 15 Mar 12

Re: Food foraging around the UK

When the conditions are right I forage winkles and mussels from the rockpools at eastbourne. been hunting for cockles but no success yet! All along the clifftops towards Birling Gap there are blackberry bushes, samphire, and even mature apple and pear trees; no doubt from discarded cores from a 1930s lunch! Ive known the entire stock of blackberries disappear in an afternoon, people filling bin sacks up. I only take what I need and leave plenty for others. theres also a massive bay tree on our street that everyone helps themselves to. Pick young hawthorn leaves for salads, they have a lovely nutty taste!

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