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#1 Wed 31 Oct 12 3:10pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Lamb foreshanks and neck of mutton - suggestions please!

Hello all,

A recent road trip has led to a freezer full of bony animal pieces. This isn't too unusual - any trip down the M6 is not complete without stopping in at Tebay Services and the farm shop.

So I have mutton neck chops and a couple of foreshanks of lamb, all from Herdwick sheep, which makes me happy. I love this kind of gnarly bony awkward meat - (especially mutton, which I can't buy here despite being surrounded by sheep!) so I don't want to waste it on something uninspired.

Does anyone have any good recipes that would suit this? I own a slow cooker so feel free to suggest slow cooker recipes, but I'm interested in oven/hob dishes too, or anything really.

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#2 Wed 31 Oct 12 3:35pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Lamb foreshanks and neck of mutton - suggestions please!

For both of the mutton neck chops and a couple of foreshanks of lamb I would slow cook them , not at the same time !
Do you have a slow cooker ?

I cooked lamb shanks only last week and this is what I did...
I browned off some chopped onions in a fry pan and put them into the slow cooker , browned of the lamb shanks and added them also , I deglazed the pan with some red wine and added this and around 1/3 bottle of the red wine to the slow cooker.
I also added a couple of bay leaves , a few mixed herbs ,around half a bottle or so of passata and around 6 or 7 cloves of garlic that I had roughly chopped .
Thats it ... lid on and slow cooked for around 6 hours
(but less time would be fine that was just a convinient time on the day ).
If you dont have a slow cooker then it would be fine cooked in a lidded casserole dish in the oven. Just cook at a highish temperature for the first hour then turn down low .

Neck of lamb... much the same . long slow cook is best.

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#3 Mon 12 Nov 12 5:18pm

JOFoodTube

Member
Member since Mon 12 Nov 12

Re: Lamb foreshanks and neck of mutton - suggestions please!

Hi Hippytea!

Good question on the mutton neck and Foreshanks of lamb here! I am currently working on Jamie's brand new YouTube Channel which is launching in January 2013. Could you send me a email via this forum so I can get in touch with you directly regarding how we might be able to use some of your great questions on the channel?

Cheers

Charles.

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#4 Tue 13 Nov 12 11:29am

TomThurston

Member
Member since Mon 15 Oct 12

Re: Lamb foreshanks and neck of mutton - suggestions please!

for the perfect tasting meat dont bother with getting it from the supermarkets make sure you get it from staight from the producer as it will be 100% fresh. if you are unsure how to get hold of these kind of people then go to foodbritain and they act as a kind of communicator for you so you can get hold of the freshest produce around!

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#5 Tue 13 Nov 12 10:05pm

cannyfradock

Member
Occupation Builder (bricklayer/ stonemason)
From S.Wales.
Member since Sat 10 Oct 09

Re: Lamb foreshanks and neck of mutton - suggestions please!

Hello Hippytea.....lucky you!!!

Presuming your mutton neck chops are either scrag or neck chops and the foreshanks are "foreshanks".....and not shanks, I would avoid the 10hr slow roasting recipes with tons of red wine as preferred by TV chefs when cooking shank of lamb. I would go for a medditeranian style of lamb casserole. As your meat (and bone) will not be in a large lump. this is how I would attack the lamb......

Put a little OO in a frying pan and heat well. Hard fry the lamb and mutton (even if it means multiple batches...if you have a lot) until a good colour is achieved. Remove the lamb from the pan and place in a warming ceramic or cast iron casserole dish. POUR AWAY all the fat from the lamb and de-glaze with a cup of cider. Pour this on the lamb.

In a mortar and pestle put 1 level tsp of dried rosemary and 1 level tsp of dried oregano with a good pinch of course sea salt and grind lightly to slightly bruise the dry herbs.

In the de-glazed pan pour in a little more OO and add chopped onions, peppers and a pinch of chillie flakes. Fry on a fair heat for 4 or 5 minutes then add the bruised herbs and 2 cloves of finely chopped...or sliced garlic and fry for a further minute. Add this to the lamb....de-glaze this pan with a small glass of Marsala or port and add to the casserole.

Add a tin of quality.....or decent plum tomatoes to the pot (I find Napolina tomatoes really good) .....at least 10 grinds of black pepper. good pinch of sugar and salt if needed. Bring the pot to the boil then reduce to a simmer. Leave uncovered for the first hour to reduce the sauce, then cover and simmer for a further 40 minutes.

You can also add mushrooms or celery etc, but very often with a Medditeranian peasant dish less is often more.

After an hour of cooking scoop off any "froth" which comes to the top of the pot.

Eat with freshly baked bread.....torn apart, not cut.

This is just my take on your initial ingredients.......

Terry

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#6 Sun 18 Nov 12 8:54pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Lamb foreshanks and neck of mutton - suggestions please!

Thanks everyone for your responses! I didn't get these til now as I hadn't set up my notifications properly and didn't know anyone had responded.

In the end I just did a basic stew with a bit of rosemary and garlic. Next time I will trim excess fat first and cook with more liquid, and leave it overnight to let me skim the fat off, as it was mega mega greasy. Tasty as all getout, but the fat! My goodness. It was mainly coming from the neck chops. I also wish I had boned it before adding dumplings as the bones escaped and got all through it, especially those little intercostal discs. Hard on the teeth, those.

At least I have a notion how to treat neck chops now; a bit like oxtail, trim the fat, brown REALLY well. I'd bone before serving next time and probably contain the neck chops in a little colander or something during cooking to stop the little discs escaping. I've done that with oxtail before and it worked well. By comparison the shanks were a doddle, not much fat and the big bones were easy to remove.

Thanks for all the suggestions, everyone!


Edit to add, I did it in the slow cooker overnight. Definitely the right choice, the meat was melting and super tasty.

Last edited by hippytea (Sun 18 Nov 12 8:55pm)

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#7 Sun 18 Nov 12 9:37pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Lamb foreshanks and neck of mutton - suggestions please!

hippytea if you bone it you dont get the same flavour , like wise if you remove all the fat. I thiink its best to let things cool a bit then fish out the bones you can find and skim off the excess fat as it will rise to the surface.

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#8 Mon 19 Nov 12 12:51pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Lamb foreshanks and neck of mutton - suggestions please!

Hi mummza - I meant I would bone it after cooking and before serving, rather than just dumping it on the plate caveman-style. As for the fat, I know a bit of fat helps the flavour, but you didn't see the sheer amount of fat that came out of this. Oceans and seas of grease! As much grease as gravy, I reckon. Far too much to skim, as it was all over the meat and veg as well as floating on the gravy. A bit of trimming would do no harm at all in this case!

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