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#11 Mon 05 Nov 12 11:38am

Earthmum

Forum champ
Occupation HR / mum / jack of all trades
From England
Member since Mon 21 Sep 09

Re: making bread using a kenwood chef

Thanks ashen - tried it this weekend and it works really well, I also made some iced buns which I filled with jam ( I bought a syringe last week !!), they looked really good and I was going to take a photo, but the family got there first - lesson learnt...... double the recipe next time  roll

gem

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#12 Tue 27 Nov 12 3:30pm

lfr

Member
Member since Tue 27 Nov 12

Re: making bread using a kenwood chef

My Kenwood was bought in 1972 and still going strong - A701A,  I had to buy a new dough hook - the old one is lost in the depths of the shed!  So interested to read comments as to how long to use the hook etc - I found the instruction book with a pamphlet on bread making but it seemed very out of date.  I will try Earthmum's recipe - thank you.

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#13 Tue 27 Nov 12 3:53pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: making bread using a kenwood chef

What's the deal with autolysing? I've never heard the term.

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#14 Thu 29 Nov 12 9:40am

Ashen

Forum champ
Occupation Why is the Rum always gone???!
From out to lunch
Member since Sat 07 Jan 06

Re: making bread using a kenwood chef

It is a fancy term for what is actually a very simple process.    high ratio hydration.   meaning lots of water mixed with  flour .  A poolish    which is often used in bread making has a high hydration aspect that helps develop gluten but also the yeast added and extra time in a slow ferment is  for taste.

A straight up example of doing an autolyse would be to take a recipe and break out the water and an equal amount of the flour from it and mix and let them sit for about 30 to 45 mins before adding the rest of the flour and other ingredients.

so in the case of a simple pizza dough recipe that looks like this.


650grams water
1000 grams flour
a package of dry active yeast (approx 8 grams)
20 -25 grams sea salt
50-60 grams olive oil
pinch of ascorbic acid

  this is a 65 %hydration dough and fairly wet if you just mix it straight up. you can do that and knead for gluten production

To use an autolyse though
simply   break out 650grams of flour from the total 1000 grams .  Mix that in equal parts with the 650grams of water and then let it sit for about 40 mins.

The high water hydration swells the wheat cells in the flour and literally rips them apart creating a large amount of gluten without the need for kneading.

add the rest of the ingredients and mix together put in a warm place to rise

use enough bench flour to make it workable by hand and
you will have a very elastic dough that can be windowpaned.  Meaning that it can be pulled out so thin that you can see through it without it ripping.


There is a pretty solid process for no knead bread that is pretty popular right now that using this principle as the core of its technique. It mixes all the ingredients together a the beginning  and lets it rest for 18 hrs.   the hydration is still fairly high although not one to one so the autolyse process takes a bit longer for the glutens to form

http://www.foodnetwork.ca/recipes/recip … ishid=9530

Last edited by Ashen (Thu 29 Nov 12 9:41am)


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#15 Thu 29 Nov 12 9:48am

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: making bread using a kenwood chef

I see! I might try that.

I have recently started using more water when making bread, as I find a wetter dough at the kneading and rising stage lets more gluten come out and you get better-risen bread at the end, even if you don't knead for as long. I wonder if this is why. (I knead with the dough very sticky, then add more flour after rising and before shaping).

Also I'm planning to try ciabatta one day, as that fascinates me - it's like the extreme end of wet-dough breadmaking, with the dough being the consistency of pancake batter at the start. The video I saw, the person was using a stand mixer to knead it, and it was the most extraordinary thing - at the end it still looked like liquid, but was holding itself together with the gluten like some kind of alien blob. Me and my underused Kenwood Chef are definitely going to try it soon!

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