Jamie Oliver

forum: Everything else

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#11 Fri 30 Nov 12 7:14pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Quick Question

Tallulah , there is no reason why more bacteria would for in the fridge as long as your fridge  is at the correct temperature.

I would have  thought that there is more of a chance of contaminating the fish if it is hot water and also it would probably wash away a cirtain amount of the flavour as the fish you would be trying to thaw would have been gutted or portioed out.

I am not disputing that putting fish i water is not a quicker way to thaw fish , but to me its not the safest method.

I live in a cooler climate and I would thaw the fish n the fridge.

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#12 Sat 01 Dec 12 12:58am

Ashen

Forum champ
Occupation Why is the Rum always gone???!
From out to lunch
Member since Sat 07 Jan 06

Re: Quick Question

Safety is all about time in the danger zone 4C and 60C (40F - 140F).   Large pieces of meat or protein can take a very long time to defrost even when in water. More than 4 hrs(total) in the danger zone is recommended against.  Remember that all time since the animal was killed until it was frozen that it spends in the danger zone is added into that 4 hrs. Generally Frozen fish is something you have to worry about the least as most ships process and freeze at sea as the ships are fishing.  Most fish you buy frozen spends little time in the danger zone from catch to being frozen. 

A small piece of fish will thaw very quickly under running water , and as pakman said you can keep it in a plastic bag while doing this.


Unless you are talking about a very large whole fish, 2 or 3 kilo salmon for instance , defrosting under cold running water won't cause any problems with a few caveats.

The kitchen sink is one of the most dirty places in the home, lots of nasty bacteria near the drain . I will make sure to do a thorough cleaning of the sink before defrosting this way. I use this method for frozen shrimp all the time btw. I just set them in a colander in the sink and use the sprayer setting on the facet and run cold water over them until they are thawed.


Only a fool argues with a skunk, a mule or a cook.  { cowboy saying}
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#13 Sat 15 Dec 12 6:59pm

SeptimusFry

Member
Member since Sat 15 Dec 12

Re: Quick Question

Newbie here...

According to the gurus, the best and safest way to defrost is in a bowl or bucket of ice water. Clearly, if the food is in a sealed bag, there is no problem with this method, but we find that fish, for example, unbagged need to be gently squeezed before cooking as they take up a lot of superficial water. We defrosted a duck overnight yesterday, but I used a freezer bag and sealed it before dunking.

The theory is that no part of the food will get above around zero. Yet the thermal conductivity of the cold water is so much higher than air (the ambience of a simple fridge defrosting) so the process is that much  quicker. Leaving outside the fridge in kitchen air is asking for bacterial trouble.

Our Microwave has a Chaos-Defrost setting, but we have hardly ever used it as we don't really trust or understand it !

Much love from France.

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#14 Sat 15 Dec 12 11:17pm

Ashen

Forum champ
Occupation Why is the Rum always gone???!
From out to lunch
Member since Sat 07 Jan 06

Re: Quick Question

I usually end up finishing defrosting turkeys that way  when I brine them.. The brine is in a large container with ice   and the whole works is put in a cool place or alternately if you have the space in a fridge.  We have a drinks fridge in our lower level kitchen(part of an in-law suite) which I strip down the shelves and place the pail into.

Last edited by Ashen (Sat 15 Dec 12 11:18pm)


Only a fool argues with a skunk, a mule or a cook.  { cowboy saying}
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