Jamie Oliver

forum: Food & Drink

Subscribe to forums RSS

#11 Wed 09 Jan 13 4:37pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: soggy/crumbly flapjacks...

Wiki says that the term flapjack dates to the 17th C. when it referred to a flat tart or pan-cake.  They claim the term wasn't used to describe a food containing oats until 1935.

    Likes (0)

#12 Thu 10 Jan 13 7:51pm

xanderlee

Member
Member since Fri 11 Jun 10

Re: soggy/crumbly flapjacks...

No, we used to have pink custard too lol.  A treat was brown custard which I guess was supposed to be chocolate but never tasted of chocolate.   puke

    Likes (0)

#13 Fri 11 Jan 13 8:35am

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: soggy/crumbly flapjacks...

MsPablo wrote:

Wiki says that the term flapjack dates to the 17th C. when it referred to a flat tart or pan-cake.

Well, the oaty ones are flat, I suppose. But not really a tart and definitely not a pancake. A tray-bake, I suppose. Like a richer version of a granola bar, but thinner and cut in squares rather than bars.

Food etymology is intriguing. It's like English muffins and American muffins, or how "biscuit" came to mean a soft sort of quick-bread in America when everywhere else in the world it means something crunchy (it means "twice cooked").

As for the crunchy kind, "biscuit" comes from the French and "cookie" comes from the Dutch, so the use of the different words tells you about the dominance of different cultures at different times. Just to add to the confusion, "cookie" in Scotland traditionally means a glazed cream bun. These days we also get chewy American-style biscuits, which are usually huge here, and sold in paper bags like doughnuts, and called cookies. And biscuits with chocolate chips in them are generally called cookies, but any other kind is called a biscuit. Confusing.

Interesting stuff, though. Pardon the ramble. Normal service will now resume.

Last edited by hippytea (Fri 11 Jan 13 8:42am)

    Likes (0)

#14 Fri 11 Jan 13 1:59pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: soggy/crumbly flapjacks...

I am familiar with the term flap jacks being applied to oat bars in Britain because I had them as a child.  Some of us have only one or two generations that were mostly born here in the U.S., so there is quite a varied experience of different cultures . . . but I think most of us realize that biscuits are cookies.  Cookies in America are also crisp and crunchy.  Chewy cookies are a newish thing here.  When I was a child, we thought soft cookies were a kind of new, odd thing, but maybe someone else had a different experience.  We always had crispy cookies  and they are still popular today.  I'm not a fan of the soft cookie because to me, they came about when companies starting using poor quality fats instead of butter in cookies.  In our family, we thought they were awful.

Last edited by MsPablo (Fri 11 Jan 13 2:04pm)

    Likes (0)

#15 Fri 11 Jan 13 2:19pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: soggy/crumbly flapjacks...

I am now confused.  I always thought the soft cookies came from America.

So the question is, where did they come from?

A conspiracy theory could be woven round this without too much effort.

    Likes (0)

#16 Fri 11 Jan 13 2:55pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: soggy/crumbly flapjacks...

Cookies have been very popular here since the early colonial days.  Both soft and crisp cookies have been made here for that long, but a 'soft' cookie would be a particular recipe, this soft texture wasn't applied to many crisp cookie recipes until fairly recently.

It is almost always a mistake to define what is 'American' by the giant commercial companies that bring you only a tiny bit of what we have available to us and most of those things don't represent American traditions very well if at all.

Last edited by MsPablo (Fri 11 Jan 13 2:56pm)

    Likes (0)

Powered by PunBB.