Jamie Oliver

forum: Food & Drink

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#1 Wed 30 Jan 13 11:21am

Jamies-Ministry

Member
Occupation Freelance photographer
From Bushey
Member since Thu 09 Apr 09

Victoria sponge

smile
Hello
can anyone post for me the recipe for a basic Victoria sponge
as i have decided it`s about time i got into the kitchen much more
& i though i would start off with something simple then move up when i`m confident.
Thanks all

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#2 Wed 30 Jan 13 1:40pm

Earthmum

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Occupation HR / mum / jack of all trades
From England
Member since Mon 21 Sep 09

Re: Victoria sponge

4 eggs
8oz caster sugar, plus a little extra for dusting the finished cake
8oz self-raising flour
2 tsp baking powder
8oz butter
Jam

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/Gas 4.
Grease and line 2 x 20cm/8in sandwich tins.

Beat Butter and sugar until fluffy, beat in eggs a little at a time ( add a spoon of flour to stop curdling ), fold in flour.

Pour into tins and bake for about 20 mins.

Sandwich together with jam and top with a sprinkle of caster sugar.

Gem 
big_smile

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#3 Wed 30 Jan 13 2:01pm

Thistledo

Member
Occupation Retired something or other
From English immigrant in S. Wales
Member since Fri 07 Dec 12

Re: Victoria sponge

Jamie, no opening the oven door during baking to take piccies.  I know you happy-snappy chaps!

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#4 Wed 30 Jan 13 3:27pm

Jamies-Ministry

Member
Occupation Freelance photographer
From Bushey
Member since Thu 09 Apr 09

Re: Victoria sponge

Thistledo wrote:

Jamie, no opening the oven door during baking to take piccies.  I know you happy-snappy chaps!

i shall take a piccie through the oven door (Glass door) wink
& thank you for your reply

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#5 Thu 31 Jan 13 9:18pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Victoria sponge

To make that recipe easier to remember, weigh the eggs first and use their weight in butter, sugar and flour. It's similar to pound cake - four ingredients, same weight of each.

I just use self-raising flour and don't add extra raising agent - must try Earthmum's recipe and compare.

Last edited by hippytea (Thu 31 Jan 13 9:18pm)

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#6 Thu 31 Jan 13 9:19pm

wine~o

Forum champ
Occupation Handyman
From Dorset u.k
Member since Tue 21 Oct 08

Re: Victoria sponge

hippytea wrote:

To make that recipe easier to remember, weigh the eggs first and use their weight in butter, sugar and flour.

I just use self-raising flour and don't add extra raising agent - must try Earthmum's recipe and compare.

Do you weigh your eggs shell on or off???

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#7 Thu 31 Jan 13 10:29pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Victoria sponge

wine-o you weigh the eggs in their shells

Victoria sandwich ..

ingredients..
*eggs
*caster sugar
*butter ( dont be tempted to use margarine , olive spread or spreadable butter , use the block butter )
*self raising flour (or plain flour with a raising agent added.) Sieve the flour in readiness for it being used.this does 2 things it removes and lumps in the flour ad it adds air into the flour


method

prepare  your 'sandwich tins' ( cake tins with low sides ) do this by greasing the sides of the tin with a little butter then shaking a bit of flour around the edges and base of the tin , yu can alsoput a circle of baking parchment on the base of the tins as well but if you are using greaseproof paper you need to greese it with a little butter


*you need to cream together the butter and the sugar till they are really very very pale and fluffy

*beat the eggs  in a seperate bowl tand add a little egg at a  time carefuly mixing it in as you dont want to knock out the air that you have put into the butter and sugar mix.
tip.. if you add a small spoonfull of flour with the egg it helps prevent the mixture curdling.

*using a large metal spoon , add about 1/3 of te flour and carefully start to fold this in , do the same with the rest of the flour.
you need to be gentle when you do this as you dont want to knock out the air you have put into the mix .
(Do NOT be tempted to fold in the flour with a wooden spoon as it will knck out the air frm the cake batter,always use a matal spoon when floding flour into cakes ).
* divide the mixture between your 2 sadwich tins and lightly spread it out evenly.
I sometimes put a little dip into the center of each cake so that they come ut of the oven looking flatter'

bake in the middle shelf of the oven for around 20 minutes. at around 180 degrees centigrade
do Not open the oven door .

you can tell when the cake is  cooked by several things...
1. the smell of the baking cake changes a bit and becomes more dominant ( as I am useless at time keeping I always notice this !!)
2. if you check the cake in the oven you will notice that it has shrunk away from the sides of the tin just a little
3 if you lightly press in the center of the cake , the cooked cake will spring back into the original shape, if it does not spring back then it is not ready to come out of the oven.

turn the cooked cake onto a wire cooking rack and once cooled sandwich the 2 cakes together with a generous layer of good quality jam , is usuall to use strawberry of raspberry jam for this .

you can use this cake mix for making little fairy cakes or as a base for other cakes.
Its a good recipe t teach children as they remember it and like weighing things out so its easy of its the same amount.

whilst Jam is a traditional filling for a Victoria sadwich , some people vary the filling and topping by using butter crean or fresh cream .
one of my daughters favorite cakes is to have fresh whipped sligtly sweetened cream and fresh raspberries in the middle of the cake rather than jam

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#8 Sat 02 Feb 13 5:02pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Victoria sponge

mummza wrote:

*butter ( dont be tempted to use margarine , olive spread or spreadable butter , use the block butter )

I am much less fussy than this, I usually use spreadable butter and have been known to use margarine with acceptable results. It probably depends how high your standards are for flavour, but it was fine from my point of view - it was cake, and it was tasty. I find pure butter is harder to cream into the sugar.

The only real disappointments I've had are with margarine spefically marketed as low-fat, e.g. Flora Light. They didn't give good results - I'm now trying to remember exactly what went wrong. I think the cake was heavy.

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#9 Sat 02 Feb 13 5:17pm

Thistledo

Member
Occupation Retired something or other
From English immigrant in S. Wales
Member since Fri 07 Dec 12

Re: Victoria sponge

Margarine is, frankly, plastic!  Haven't had it in the house for years.  Only block butter for me.  It's easy to soften, if necessary.

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#10 Sun 03 Feb 13 12:30am

@nGoose1

Forum champ
Occupation Shop worker/KP/ Commis chef
From UK/Germany
Member since Wed 28 Oct 09

Re: Victoria sponge

The main issue with margarine is the taste; unsalted butter is the only way. Michele Roux's words not mine, he is of course right.
I am still learning to make cakes. Creaming butter and sugar makes for a lighter cake. All ingredients need to be room temperature.
I think the others know more about this than myself.

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