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#1 Fri 29 Mar 13 8:48pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Home made frozen yoghurt!

I've been on a yoghurt mission recently, churning the stuff out by the bucketful. I literally made 12 pints this week. That's a bit excessive, I admit, but I just keep finding more things you can do with it! And it's just so satisfying when you take it out and see that perfect, smooth surface with just the slightest cheeky wobble. It's like alchemy or a miracle, milk into yoghurt...

Anyway, I suddenly thought, "can you make frozen yoghurt at home?". And apparently, yes, you can, and it's much easier than ice cream. In fact, it's significantly easier than remembering my own name first thing in the morning. And it is delicious. If you've never had frozen yoghurt, it's like a cross between ice cream and sorbet - creamy but light.

Here's how:

500ml Greek yoghurt or 1 litre regular plain yoghurt
1 jar jam of your choice
lemon juice and sugar - optional

If using regular yoghurt, put a clean tea towel in a seive over a bowl, pour the yoghurt in and strain in the fridge for about 2 hours - it should lose about half its volume and get nice and thick. Greek yoghurt can be used as-is.

Put jam in a bowl and stir vigorously to break the set. Whizz with a hand blender if you don't want chunks. Mix the jam with the yoghurt and taste it. Add sugar if needed - it needs to taste a bit "too sweet", as freezing will make it less so. If you want to liven it up, add a bit of lemon juice too.

And that's it. Freeze as for ice cream. I have a machine, so I don't have experience making ice cream without it, but there are loads of instructions out there for doing it without - you put it in a shallow dish and take it out of the freezer every so often to stir it up, I'm not sure how often.

Seriously, you should try this. I'm not saying it's better than ice cream, but it hits a different spot. Really refreshing. In Summer I'll try it with fresh fruit instead of jam, but there's none worth having just now.

Last edited by hippytea (Fri 29 Mar 13 8:53pm)

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#2 Fri 29 Mar 13 10:50pm

Maree

Forum super champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Home made frozen yoghurt!

I do the same with 500ml of Greek yogurt, 500g of frozen berries, a small amount of castor sugar (to taste), lemon juice optional. Churn or whizz up. Just remember that freezing causes the product to taste less sweet than pre-freezing.


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
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#3 Fri 29 Mar 13 11:17pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Home made frozen yoghurt!

And the process reduces the health benefits of the yogurt as those cultures normally don't survive the extreme temps.

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#4 Sat 30 Mar 13 9:58am

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Home made frozen yoghurt!

Actually yoghurt cultures are fine with freezing - a lot of people freeze yoghurt to use as a starter for future batches. (It works better than keeping it in the fridge, as the culture stays active in the fridge, eats up all its food, makes its environment increasingly acidic, and the different strains compete and get out of balance, so over time a refrigerated culture gets weak - whereas in the freezer it goes dormant).

Granted the quick defrosting when you eat it may shock the culture a little, so it's possibly a little less effectively probiotic than chilled yoghurt, but it's not dead. It's as alive and ready to go as the salmonella in your frozen chicken portions...!

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#5 Sat 30 Mar 13 1:55pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Home made frozen yoghurt!

The reason I mentioned it is that I had looked online for information about this in the past, curious to know if freezing yogurt reduces the good bacteria.  According to most of the information I find online, it kills almost all of the good bacteria.  I am not sure if this is reliable information, but I think it sounds pretty reasonable.
http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/20 … .Gb.r.html

Last edited by MsPablo (Sat 30 Mar 13 1:55pm)

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#6 Sat 30 Mar 13 2:48pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Home made frozen yoghurt!

I'm not sure that is reliable information, I'm afraid. Commercial yoghurt starters are usually freeze-dried and often stored in the freezer - if that killed a significant amount of the bacteria then it would make the starter weak and ineffective.

Check out this yoghurt recipe:

http://cheeseforum.org/articles/wiki-yo … ng-recipe/

This is a pretty serious site for all kinds of cheese and dairy products, aimed at both hobby makers and small-scale commercial. I've gone through a lot of the material on here, in the wiki and forums, and there are some very knowledgeable people on there. The recipe I've linked to mentions both freeze-dried commercial starters and the practice of freezing yoghurt in ice-cube trays to use for starting. Yoghurt bacteria are pretty robust.

Similarly, all the food safety info I've ever read emphasises that freezing has no impact on bacteria and that you should assume there is as much bacteria in it after freezing as there was before. They are much more affected by high temperatures.

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#7 Sat 30 Mar 13 3:22pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Home made frozen yoghurt!

Here is information from a qualified person.  It is apparently less destructive to use quick freezing methods, but the longer process of a home freezer will destroy some bacteria.  If you start with more bacteria, it'll have more after freezing, so in making your own frozen yogurt, you can choose something that has more from the start.
http://tuftsjournal.tufts.edu/2008/06/professor/01/

The issue with bacteria that is not killed by freezing for the home cook is that it doesn't take much and it begins to grow as soon as the food reaches a certain temperature.  It's not that some bacteria is not killed by freezing, it is, but not enough for the food to be considered free of bacteria.  Remember too that every single ingredient that goes in to a dish will have some bacteria on it and also it's flying around in the air, on surfaces of utensils, hands, etc.  It's all about the numbers.

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#8 Tue 02 Apr 13 8:05pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Home made frozen yoghurt!

Thanks for the info.

I shall hereby insert a disclaimer: this recipe is not intended to be a probiotic health food. It is a tasty pudding. Eat at your own risk of not-specifically-health-promoting joy.

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