Mediterranean-style dab

Dab

Serves 2

  • 2 whole dab, from sustainable sources, ask your fishmonger, skin on and gutted

  • olive oil

  • 4 rashers higher-welfare smoked streaky bacon

  • 1 tablespoon pine nuts

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 small bunch fresh flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped

  • 1 lemon

  • 8 cherry tomatoes, on the vine, halved or quartered

  • 1 small handful black olives, stone in

  • 2 large handfuls salad leaves, such as rocket radicchio and chicory, washed and spun dry

  • balsamic vinegar

  • extra virgin olive oil

Use a small sharp knife to score the dab at 2cm intervals on both sides. Add a splash of olive oil to a large pan on a high heat. Add the bacon and pine nuts and cook for a couple of minutes, or until lightly golden.



Meanwhile, scatter a pinch of salt and pepper over the fish. Sprinkle over a little of the chopped parsley and finely grate over the zest of ½ a lemon. Rub that flavouring into the fish, making sure you get it into all the cuts. Repeat on the other side.



Tip the bacon and pine nuts onto a plate, add another splash of oil to the pan if you need to, followed by the dab, skin-side down. You may need to cook them in 2 batches or use 2 pans. After a couple of minutes, check to see if the fish are turning golden, and once they are, flip them over. Add the tomatoes to the pan with the olives and remaining parsley. Give the pan a good shake, then add the bacon and pine nuts.



Quickly dress your salad leaves with a lug of balsamic, the juice of ½ a lemon, a pinch of salt and pepper and a couple of lugs of extra virgin olive oil. Use your clean fingers to toss it all together.



Cook the fish for about 6 or 7 minutes in total. To tell if it's cooked, put your fork into the plumpest part of the flesh and if you can easily pull it away from the bone, it's ready. Squeeze over the juice from your remaining lemon half, give the pan one last quick shake then take off the heat and serve with the salad on the side. You could have it with new potatoes too, if you like.

Nutritional Information

Mediterranean-style dab

With bacon, olives, tomatoes and pine nuts

0 foodies cooked this
Dab fish is a little bit like lemon sole, and succulent and sweet when cooked on the bone like this
Serves 2
30m
Super easy
Method

Dab is from the beautiful flatfish family – it's flaky, sweet, juicy and delicious and is similar to lemon sole. Virtually all dab caught – around 96% – gets thrown back into the sea, dead. I think that's an unforgivable waste. If we could all start eating dab now and then, it would really help ease the pressure currently on the big five: cod, haddock, prawns, salmon and tuna. But unfortunately, it's not easy to get at the moment because it's all being thrown back, so we need to start asking for it. Let's create a demand and get it in the shops! Don't be nervous about cooking fish on the bone. It makes the flesh juicier and more succulent, and gives it another dimension of flavour you just can't get with fillets.

Use a small sharp knife to score the dab at 2cm intervals on both sides. Add a splash of olive oil to a large pan on a high heat. Add the bacon and pine nuts and cook for a couple of minutes, or until lightly golden.

Meanwhile, scatter a pinch of salt and pepper over the fish. Sprinkle over a little of the chopped parsley and finely grate over the zest of ½ a lemon. Rub that flavouring into the fish, making sure you get it into all the cuts. Repeat on the other side.

Tip the bacon and pine nuts onto a plate, add another splash of oil to the pan if you need to, followed by the dab, skin-side down. You may need to cook them in 2 batches or use 2 pans. After a couple of minutes, check to see if the fish are turning golden, and once they are, flip them over. Add the tomatoes to the pan with the olives and remaining parsley. Give the pan a good shake, then add the bacon and pine nuts.

Quickly dress your salad leaves with a lug of balsamic, the juice of ½ a lemon, a pinch of salt and pepper and a couple of lugs of extra virgin olive oil. Use your clean fingers to toss it all together.

Cook the fish for about 6 or 7 minutes in total. To tell if it's cooked, put your fork into the plumpest part of the flesh and if you can easily pull it away from the bone, it's ready. Squeeze over the juice from your remaining lemon half, give the pan one last quick shake then take off the heat and serve with the salad on the side. You could have it with new potatoes too, if you like.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:

Calories

Calories are just a unit of energy. If you eat more than you use you can gain weight, or lose it if you don't eat enough. How much you need depends on your weight, gender and how active you are, but it's around 2,000 a day.

Carbs

Carbs are a great source of energy and, excluding foods such as potatoes, are made from grains - like bread, pasta and cereal. We all need carbs, but try to make them all wholegrain by sticking to brown bread, rice and pasta - they are much more nutritious.

Sugar

We all deserve a treat sometimes, but try to limit your sugar intake. Most of your sugar should come from raw fruit and milk, because they give us lots of nutrients too. Always check food labels so you know how much sugar you're eating.

Fat

We all need to eat a small amount of fat because it protects our organs and helps us grow. But we need to be careful about how much fat we eat and what kinds of fat, because in higher levels it's associated with weight gain, diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

Saturates

Saturated or "bad fats" are in beef, pork, chicken skin, butter, cream and cheese. Too much can be bad for our heart and cholesterol levels, but unsaturated or "good fats" in fish, nuts, avocados and some oils can help keep our hearts healthy if eaten in moderation.

Protein

Protein helps our muscles to grow and repair, as well as providing you with essential amino acids. When it comes to protein, try to eat leaner sources such as chicken and fish or non-meat sources such as eggs, dairy, beans, nuts, seeds, tofu and pulses.
  • Calories 720
    36%
  • Carbs 2.5g
    1%
  • Sugar 2.4g 3%
  • Fat 39.6g 57%
  • Saturates 6.5g 33%
  • Protein 86.5g 192%
Of an adult's reference intake

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BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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