Ultimate gingerbread

gingerbread

Serves Makes 8-10

  • 400 g shortbread

  • 170 g coarse demerara sugar

  • 3 level teaspoons ground ginger

  • 40 g mixed peel, chopped

  • 40 g crystallized ginger, chopped

  • 70 g plain flour

  • 1 pinch baking powder

  • 40 g golden syrup

  • 40 g treacle

  • 70 g unsalted butter

Preheat the oven to 170ºC/325ºF/gas 3 and find a baking tray about 20x35cm. Put the shortbread, sugar and 2 teaspoons of the ground ginger in a food processor and whiz until you have crumbs. Remove 100g of the mix and keep this to one side. Add the remaining teaspoon of ginger to the processor, along with the mixed peel, crystallized ginger, flour and baking powder, and pulse until well mixed.



Melt the syrup, treacle and butter together in a saucepan big enough to hold all the ingredients. When melted, add the mixture from the food processor and stir with a wooden spoon until everything is thoroughly mixed together. Tip into the baking tray and spread out evenly. Press the mixture down into the tray, using your fingers or something flat and clean like a potato masher or a spatula. When the mix is a flat, dense and even layer, pop the tray in the preheated oven for 10 minutes.



Take the tray out of the oven and sprinkle the hot gingerbread with the reserved crumbs, pressing them down really well with a potato masher or spatula. Carefully cut into good-sized pieces with a sharp knife, and leave to cool in the tray before eating.







Nutritional Information

Ultimate gingerbread

Gorgeous with ice cream and as a cheesecake base

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0 foodies cooked this
Inspired by a secret gingerbread recipe (they wouldn't share!), my version's up there with the best
Serves Makes 8-10
25m (plus cooling time)
Super easy
Method

The best gingerbread I've ever eaten in my life is from a shop in Grasmere, in the Lake District, that I visited some years ago. They use a secret recipe which is about 150 years old and, of course, they wouldn't let me in on it, so I decided to have a go at my own... and it's not half bad – in fact, this will be some of the best gingerbread you'll ever eat! So, here we go. Don't forget, you can eat this simply as a biscuit, but it also works well sprinkled over ice cream or dipped into warm compote and cream for afternoon tea. And it's especially nice when used as a cheesecake base.

Preheat the oven to 170ºC/325ºF/gas 3 and find a baking tray about 20x35cm. Put the shortbread, sugar and 2 teaspoons of the ground ginger in a food processor and whiz until you have crumbs. Remove 100g of the mix and keep this to one side. Add the remaining teaspoon of ginger to the processor, along with the mixed peel, crystallized ginger, flour and baking powder, and pulse until well mixed.

Melt the syrup, treacle and butter together in a saucepan big enough to hold all the ingredients. When melted, add the mixture from the food processor and stir with a wooden spoon until everything is thoroughly mixed together. Tip into the baking tray and spread out evenly. Press the mixture down into the tray, using your fingers or something flat and clean like a potato masher or a spatula. When the mix is a flat, dense and even layer, pop the tray in the preheated oven for 10 minutes.

Take the tray out of the oven and sprinkle the hot gingerbread with the reserved crumbs, pressing them down really well with a potato masher or spatula. Carefully cut into good-sized pieces with a sharp knife, and leave to cool in the tray before eating.



Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 399 20%
  • Carbs 57.1g 25%
  • Sugar 34.6g 38%
  • Fat 17.0g 24%
  • Saturates 11.0g 55%
  • Protein 3.6g 8%
Of an adult's reference intake

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When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
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