Blackened barbecued pork fillets

bbq pork fillet

Serves 8

  • For the marinade

  • ½ teaspoon cumin seeds

  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds

  • 2 cloves

  • 1 heaped tablespoon sweet smoked paprika

  • zest and juice of 1 orange

  • 1 small bunch of fresh thyme, leaves picked and very finely chopped

  • 4 cloves of garlic, peeled and very finely chopped

  • 150 ml Heinz organic tomato ketchup

  • 6 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

  • For the pork

  • 4 x 400 g higher-welfare pork fillets

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 handful of fresh coriander, leaves picked and chopped, optional

  • juice of optional 1 lemon

To make your marinade, crush up the cumin, fennel seeds and cloves in a pestle and mortar and mix with the paprika, orange zest and juice, thyme, garlic, ketchup and balsamic vinegar. Season the pork fillets with salt and pepper, then toss them in most of the marinade until completely coated. Feel free to marinate for half a day, but at least an hour. If you have metal or wooden skewers, lay the fillets side by side and skewer them together about 2.5cm apart.



When you're ready to cook, simply put the meat on to a barbecue or under a hot grill for 15 to 20 minutes or until nicely charred. Every time you turn the meat, brush it generously with the leftover marinade so you build up a sticky, blackened glaze. When they're done, put the fillets on a big platter and allow to rest for 5 minutes. Slice the meat between the skewers, or just slice each fillet in half, and sprinkle over some chopped coriander or squeeze over some lemon juice if you fancy.

Nutritional Information

Blackened barbecued pork fillets

With a Texan-style marinade

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0 foodies cooked this
A real taste of the South, these properly juicy BBQ pork fillet skewers are smoking hot
Serves 8
30m (plus marinating and resting time)
Super easy
Method

Although it's hard to define what "proper" American cooking is, I've been inspired by the food from the Deep South, where there is an incredible amount of smoking, salting, barbecuing and spit-roasting going on - really intelligent cooking. This is a recipe inspired by the kinds of flavours I tasted when I was in Texas. Skewers are useful for this recipe. They hold the four fillets together, making it easier to turn over when on the barbecue or under the grill. It also makes serving slightly easier because when you come to slice the fillets up, you can do it between the skewers, giving you pork "lollipops" of blackened meat, which is quite fun. But if you don't have them, you can just use your tongs. When you've made this once, I guarantee you'll make it at least once a year as it's so damn good. Great with salad, spiced beans, corn on the cob or rice.

To make your marinade, crush up the cumin, fennel seeds and cloves in a pestle and mortar and mix with the paprika, orange zest and juice, thyme, garlic, ketchup and balsamic vinegar. Season the pork fillets with salt and pepper, then toss them in most of the marinade until completely coated. Feel free to marinate for half a day, but at least an hour. If you have metal or wooden skewers, lay the fillets side by side and skewer them together about 2.5cm apart.

When you're ready to cook, simply put the meat on to a barbecue or under a hot grill for 15 to 20 minutes or until nicely charred. Every time you turn the meat, brush it generously with the leftover marinade so you build up a sticky, blackened glaze. When they're done, put the fillets on a big platter and allow to rest for 5 minutes. Slice the meat between the skewers, or just slice each fillet in half, and sprinkle over some chopped coriander or squeeze over some lemon juice if you fancy.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 335 17%
  • Carbs 8.7g 3%
  • Sugar 7.8g 9%
  • Fat 13.2g 19%
  • Saturates 4.6g 23%
  • Protein 44.7g 99%
Of an adult's reference intake

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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