Chestnut, rosemary & pancetta focaccia

Serves 8 as antipasto

  • 300 g Tipo 00 flour, plus extra

  • 100 g semolina flour

  • 100 g chestnut flour

  • 1/2 tsp sugar

  • 6 g fine sea salt

  • 2 x 7 g sachets of dried yeast

  • 325 ml tepid water

  • Olive oil

  • 125 g vacuum-packed chestnuts

  • A handful of small rosemary sprigs

  • 50 g thinly sliced pancetta, cut into 5cm lenghts

Recipe by Pete Begg



1. Pour the flours into a large bowl with the sugar, salt and yeast and mix well. Form a well in the centre and pour in the water, then mix the liquid around with your fingers, drawing flour in and gradually combining the ingredients to form a dough.



2. Transfer the dough to a floured surface; knead for 5 minutes, then put back in a clean bowl, cover with a warm, damp cloth and leave somewhere warmish to prove.



3. Preheat the oven to 200C/gas 6. Meanwhile, lightly oil a 20cm x 30cm baking tray. When the dough has doubled in size, which should take about 30 minutes, tip it back onto the floured work surface and knead again briefly, adding flour if it's a little too sticky.



4. Rub a rolling pin with flour and roll the dough to form a 30cm x 20cm rectangle. Using the rolling pin, lift the dough and unroll it over the tray, dropping it neatly into place. Leave to prove for another 30 minutes.



5. When the focaccia has risen again slightly, push the chestnuts and rosemary springs into the dough. Lay the pancetta on top, so it can crisp up in the oven. Sprinkle with a little salt and drizzle with olive oil. Bake for 15–20 minutes, then remove and place on a cooling rack. Drizzle the focaccia generously with olive oil, and sprinkle with a little more sea salt.

Nutritional Information

Chestnut, rosemary & pancetta focaccia

Crisp bread topped with herbs & Italian bacon

More Christmas recipes >
0 foodies cooked this
An incredible bread - aromatic with rosemary, salty thanks to pancetta, and earthy from the chestnuts
Serves 8 as antipasto
40m (plus 1 hour proofing time)
Not too tricky
Method

Recipe by Pete Begg

1. Pour the flours into a large bowl with the sugar, salt and yeast and mix well. Form a well in the centre and pour in the water, then mix the liquid around with your fingers, drawing flour in and gradually combining the ingredients to form a dough.

2. Transfer the dough to a floured surface; knead for 5 minutes, then put back in a clean bowl, cover with a warm, damp cloth and leave somewhere warmish to prove.

3. Preheat the oven to 200C/gas 6. Meanwhile, lightly oil a 20cm x 30cm baking tray. When the dough has doubled in size, which should take about 30 minutes, tip it back onto the floured work surface and knead again briefly, adding flour if it's a little too sticky.

4. Rub a rolling pin with flour and roll the dough to form a 30cm x 20cm rectangle. Using the rolling pin, lift the dough and unroll it over the tray, dropping it neatly into place. Leave to prove for another 30 minutes.

5. When the focaccia has risen again slightly, push the chestnuts and rosemary springs into the dough. Lay the pancetta on top, so it can crisp up in the oven. Sprinkle with a little salt and drizzle with olive oil. Bake for 15–20 minutes, then remove and place on a cooling rack. Drizzle the focaccia generously with olive oil, and sprinkle with a little more sea salt.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 291 15%
  • Carbs 49.7g 19%
  • Sugar 4.5g 5%
  • Fat 5.9g 8%
  • Saturates 1.2g 6%
  • Protein 8.6g 19%
Of an adult's reference intake

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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