Deep-pan pizza

Serves 10-12

  • For the dough:

  • 650 ml lukewarm water

  • 1 x 7 g sachet of dried yeast

  • 1 tablespoon golden caster sugar

  • 1 level tablespoon fine sea salt

  • 1 kg strong white bread flour, plus extra for dusting

  • For the tomato sauce:

  • a swig of white wine vinegar

  • 1 clove of garlic, peeled

  • a handful of fresh basil leaves

  • 1 x 400 g tin of chopped tomatoes

  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

  • For the toppings:

  • olive oil

  • 3 red onions, peeled and finely sliced

  • a few sprigs of fresh thyme, leaves picked

  • 4 higher-welfare pork sausages, the best quality you can afford

  • 1 dried red chilli

  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds

  • a good pinch of dried oregano

  • 100 g fresh buffalo mozzarella

  • a handful of fresh basil leaves

  • 2 fresh red chillies, finely sliced

  • 2 large handfuls of freshly grated Parmesan cheese

  • 12 slices of higher-welfare pancetta

Until recently, I'd always seen this type of pizza as a slightly greedy way of bulking out crusts and toppings. I hadn't realized Italian immigrants had cleverly adapted their old-world recipes to suit new-world coalfired ovens. Making pizzas in tins to protect the base from the soot of the oven makes perfect sense to me now, and I can honestly say that when it's cooked and seasoned with proper love and care, I'm more than happy with this representative of the pizza family.



To make your dough, pour your lukewarm water into a large bowl and use a fork to stir in the yeast, sugar and salt. Add your flour, bit by bit, until it comes together. You want smooth springy dough, so keep adding a bit more flour if necessary. Dust a clean surface with flour, then knead the dough with your hands. When you're happy with the consistency, pop it into a flour-dusted bowl, cover with a damp cloth and leave in a warm room until the dough has almost doubled in size.



Meanwhile, put a lug of olive oil into a large pan on a medium heat. Add your sliced onions and thyme leaves and cook for 15 minutes, or until softened and golden. Take the pan off the heat and put aside. Put all the tomato sauce ingredients into a food processor or liquidizer with a good pinch of salt and pepper and blitz to a purée. Have a taste and season carefully, adding a bit more salt and pepper if it needs it.



Slit the sausages open and squeeze the meat into a bowl. Bash up the dried chilli and fennel seeds in a pestle and mortar, add these to the meat with the dried oregano and mix well with a fork.



Preheat your oven to 200ºC/400ºF/gas 6. Divide the dough in half and oil 2 trays (about 25 x 35cm) with olive oil. Use a rolling pin or clean hands to flatten and stretch the dough out. Roll or push the dough around each tray and really push it into the corners so you get a chubby crust and a base about 1cm thick.



Divide your blitzed tomato sauce between the pizzas and spread around. Scatter over the caramelized onions and dot small pinches of the sausage mixture around the top of each pizza. Tear up the mozzarella and dot the pieces over the sausage, then sprinkle over the fresh basil leaves, sliced fresh chilli, a good pinch of salt and pepper and the grated Parmesan. Finally let your slices of pancetta sort of fall on to the pizzas so they curl and crisp up as they cook. Place in the bottom of the oven for about 20 minutes so the base gets nice and crispy while the top is cooking. Once your pizzas are beautifully cooked, serve right away with a fresh green lemony salad.

Nutritional Information

Deep-pan pizza

Topped with sausage, crispy pancetta and caramelized onions

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This classic American recipe with a killer crusty base and beautiful meaty toppings makes the perfect pizza.
Serves 10-12
1h 15m (including proving time)
Not too tricky
Print this recipe
Method

Until recently, I'd always seen this type of pizza as a slightly greedy way of bulking out crusts and toppings. I hadn't realized Italian immigrants had cleverly adapted their old-world recipes to suit new-world coalfired ovens. Making pizzas in tins to protect the base from the soot of the oven makes perfect sense to me now, and I can honestly say that when it's cooked and seasoned with proper love and care, I'm more than happy with this representative of the pizza family.

To make your dough, pour your lukewarm water into a large bowl and use a fork to stir in the yeast, sugar and salt. Add your flour, bit by bit, until it comes together. You want smooth springy dough, so keep adding a bit more flour if necessary. Dust a clean surface with flour, then knead the dough with your hands. When you're happy with the consistency, pop it into a flour-dusted bowl, cover with a damp cloth and leave in a warm room until the dough has almost doubled in size.

Meanwhile, put a lug of olive oil into a large pan on a medium heat. Add your sliced onions and thyme leaves and cook for 15 minutes, or until softened and golden. Take the pan off the heat and put aside. Put all the tomato sauce ingredients into a food processor or liquidizer with a good pinch of salt and pepper and blitz to a purée. Have a taste and season carefully, adding a bit more salt and pepper if it needs it.

Slit the sausages open and squeeze the meat into a bowl. Bash up the dried chilli and fennel seeds in a pestle and mortar, add these to the meat with the dried oregano and mix well with a fork.

Preheat your oven to 200ºC/400ºF/gas 6. Divide the dough in half and oil 2 trays (about 25 x 35cm) with olive oil. Use a rolling pin or clean hands to flatten and stretch the dough out. Roll or push the dough around each tray and really push it into the corners so you get a chubby crust and a base about 1cm thick.

Divide your blitzed tomato sauce between the pizzas and spread around. Scatter over the caramelized onions and dot small pinches of the sausage mixture around the top of each pizza. Tear up the mozzarella and dot the pieces over the sausage, then sprinkle over the fresh basil leaves, sliced fresh chilli, a good pinch of salt and pepper and the grated Parmesan. Finally let your slices of pancetta sort of fall on to the pizzas so they curl and crisp up as they cook. Place in the bottom of the oven for about 20 minutes so the base gets nice and crispy while the top is cooking. Once your pizzas are beautifully cooked, serve right away with a fresh green lemony salad.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:

Calories

Calories are just a unit of energy. If you eat more than you use you can gain weight, or lose it if you don't eat enough. How much you need depends on your weight, gender and how active you are, but it's around 2,000 a day.

Carbs

Carbs are a great source of energy and, excluding foods such as potatoes, are made from grains - like bread, pasta and cereal. We all need carbs, but try to make them all wholegrain by sticking to brown bread, rice and pasta - they are much more nutritious.

Sugar

We all deserve a treat sometimes, but try to limit your sugar intake. Most of your sugar should come from raw fruit and milk, because they give us lots of nutrients too. Always check food labels so you know how much sugar you're eating.

Fat

We all need to eat a small amount of fat because it protects our organs and helps us grow. But we need to be careful about how much fat we eat and what kinds of fat, because in higher levels it's associated with weight gain, diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

Saturates

Saturated or "bad fats" are in beef, pork, chicken skin, butter, cream and cheese. Too much can be bad for our heart and cholesterol levels, but unsaturated or "good fats" in fish, nuts, avocados and some oils can help keep our hearts healthy if eaten in moderation.

Protein

Protein helps our muscles to grow and repair, as well as providing you with essential amino acids. When it comes to protein, try to eat leaner sources such as chicken and fish or non-meat sources such as eggs, dairy, beans, nuts, seeds, tofu and pulses.
  • Calories 594
    30%
  • Carbs 78.5g
    30%
  • Sugar 8g 9%
  • Fat 18.8g 27%
  • Saturates 7.3g 37%
  • Protein 25.9g 58%
Of an adult's reference intake

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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  • For the dough:

  • 650 ml lukewarm water

  • 1 x 7 g sachet of dried yeast

  • 1 tablespoon golden caster sugar

  • 1 level tablespoon fine sea salt

  • 1 kg strong white bread flour, plus extra for dusting

  • For the tomato sauce:

  • a swig of white wine vinegar

  • 1 clove of garlic, peeled

  • a handful of fresh basil leaves

  • 1 x 400 g tin of chopped tomatoes

  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

  • For the toppings:

  • olive oil

  • 3 red onions, peeled and finely sliced

  • a few sprigs of fresh thyme, leaves picked

  • 4 higher-welfare pork sausages, the best quality you can afford

  • 1 dried red chilli

  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds

  • a good pinch of dried oregano

  • 100 g fresh buffalo mozzarella

  • a handful of fresh basil leaves

  • 2 fresh red chillies, finely sliced

  • 2 large handfuls of freshly grated Parmesan cheese

  • 12 slices of higher-welfare pancetta